Why is a bridge so much more expensive than an AP or router

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

I can find a Super-G AP/router for about $50, but a G bridge is still
$100-150.
I can almost get a pair of WDS-capable AP/routers instead of extending an
existing router with a bridge.

yuki
4 answers Last reply
More about bridge expensive router
  1. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    On Sun, 27 Jun 2004 20:33:51 -0700, "yuki" <notread_news@comcast.net>
    wrote:

    >I can find a Super-G AP/router for about $50, but a G bridge is still
    >$100-150.

    because a bridge has two lots of radio kit in it ?

    Phil
    --
    spamcop.net address commissioned 18/06/04
    Come on down !
  2. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Not necessarily. The Buffalo 802.11b AP/bridges are both AP
    and bridge (and could do both simultaneously unlike Linksys
    and some others, I understand), and so AP and bridge cost
    the same because they are the same unit.

    I believe---correct me if wrong---that the new
    Buffalo 802.11b/g boxes which use I think the Broadcom chip
    are also still combined AP/bridge, and can bridge not only to
    other Buffalo 802.11b/g AP/bridges
    but also to the older Buffalo 802.11b AP/bridges, or so I
    was told.

    Can bridging work between different manufacturers?
    What are the possible values of X and Y where
    manufacturer X's bridge can bridge with manufacturer Y's bridges?
  3. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    c hore <carhore@yahoo.com> wrote:

    > Can bridging work between different manufacturers?

    Sometimes. Buffalo's equipment can bridge to the Apple AirPort Extreme
    Base Station. (AFAIK, both use Broadcom.)


    > What are the possible values of X and Y where manufacturer X's bridge can
    > bridge with manufacturer Y's bridges?

    I didn't know there would be math on this exam.
  4. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    "c hore" <carhore@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:ca167c61.0406290920.4a35f839@posting.google.com...
    > Not necessarily. The Buffalo 802.11b AP/bridges are both AP
    > and bridge (and could do both simultaneously unlike Linksys
    > and some others, I understand), and so AP and bridge cost
    > the same because they are the same unit.
    >
    > I believe---correct me if wrong---that the new
    > Buffalo 802.11b/g boxes which use I think the Broadcom chip
    > are also still combined AP/bridge, and can bridge not only to
    > other Buffalo 802.11b/g AP/bridges
    > but also to the older Buffalo 802.11b AP/bridges, or so I
    > was told.
    >

    I actually bought one of these Buffalo 802.11b AP/router a while ago.
    I flashed the firmware, set it up as an AP, worked fine.
    Then I tried to enable WDS to bridge to my main NetGear FWAG114 AP/router,
    but I could not make it work.

    > Can bridging work between different manufacturers?

    I am not even sure if I can get those cheaper NetGear AP/router that are
    capable of WDS to bridge to my FWAG114.

    I may be able to use one of those game adapter instead of a full bridge, but
    I don't know if I can put a hub/switch to run multiple devices.

    yuki
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