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Command line "ZIP" archiver?

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Anonymous
August 21, 2005 6:34:57 PM

Archived from groups: aus.computers,alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

G'day mates,

Any recommendations for a current generation command line
"ZIP" archiver to run under Windows ME/XP please?

It would need to be compatible with old PKZIP archives and able to
handle ZIP format WinZIP files in/out.

I want something that can be run from a batch file as well as directly
from the command line, and "knows" about modern Windows file naming
conventions and directory structures (and hard disk formats and sizes,
if relevant in this context).

It would need to handle the usual options relating to "updating",
"extracting", storing path names or not, etc. etc.

Thanks for reading.

Cheers, Phred.

--
ppnerkDELETE@THISyahoo.com.INVALID
Anonymous
August 21, 2005 6:34:58 PM

Archived from groups: aus.computers,alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

>modern Windows file naming
>conventions and directory structures (and hard disk formats and sizes,
>if relevant in this context).

Where did you come from,a MSDN subscription advertisment
Only suggestion is 7-zip.org
Used to be command line once,has an interface now.
Anonymous
August 21, 2005 7:47:04 PM

Archived from groups: aus.computers,alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

7-zip still has command-line programs as part of the package... Ben Myers

On 21 Aug 2005 07:45:50 -0700, "Magic Mushroom Farmer" <jjbruce@gmail.com>
wrote:

>>modern Windows file naming
>>conventions and directory structures (and hard disk formats and sizes,
>>if relevant in this context).
>
>Where did you come from,a MSDN subscription advertisment
>Only suggestion is 7-zip.org
>Used to be command line once,has an interface now.
>
Related resources
Anonymous
August 21, 2005 9:34:51 PM

Archived from groups: aus.computers,alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

>And Microsoft Services for Unix (a free download)
Is there not a free zip program from M$ in the Free Visual C toolkit
for XP aswell?
There was a free command line cd writer in this pack and heaps of other
stuff
Anonymous
August 22, 2005 1:51:16 AM

Archived from groups: aus.computers,alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Phred wrote:
> G'day mates,
>
> Any recommendations for a current generation command line
> "ZIP" archiver to run under Windows ME/XP please?
>
> It would need to be compatible with old PKZIP archives and able to
> handle ZIP format WinZIP files in/out.
>
> I want something that can be run from a batch file as well as directly
> from the command line, and "knows" about modern Windows file naming
> conventions and directory structures (and hard disk formats and sizes,
> if relevant in this context).
>
> It would need to handle the usual options relating to "updating",
> "extracting", storing path names or not, etc. etc.
>
> Thanks for reading.
>
> Cheers, Phred.
>
Cygwin offers free CLI zip, gzip and bzip compressors and decompressors.
It also has all the standard GNU utilities (like the Unix version of
find which can be used to unzip recursively, etc.). Naming is handled
appropriately, and batching is easy (may want to look to installing Cron).
Anonymous
August 22, 2005 3:19:03 AM

Archived from groups: aus.computers,alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

> Any recommendations for a current generation command line
> "ZIP" archiver to run under Windows ME/XP please?
> It would need to be compatible with old PKZIP archives and able to
> handle ZIP format WinZIP files in/out.

WinZip has an optional command-line interface component. It's a free
download:

http://www.winzip.com/downcl.htm

I've found WinZip handles 99% of the tasks I've thrown at it. It's as good
as anything else.

Cheers
Andrew
Anonymous
August 22, 2005 3:31:40 AM

Archived from groups: aus.computers,alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Nicholas Andrade <sdnick484@nospam.yahoo.com> wrote:

> Cygwin offers free CLI zip, gzip and bzip compressors and

Not to start a religious war, but ... why would anyone install Cygwin, just
to compress/uncompress some files?

WinZip is an extremely widespread compression utility, and a native Win32
application. It can unzip tar, .Z, .gz, .tgz, uuencoded and other common
Unix formats, as well as common PC formats like ZIP and CAB. (The only
thing it can't do is create new gzip archives).

Likewise, the Windows Task Scheduler will be sufficient for the vast
majority of users wanting to kick off batch proccesses at a certain time:
you'd have to dig deep into cron to start using features that aren't there
in Task Scheduler.

Cygwin can be a useful package in the Unix-interop scenario, but it sounds
way off-target and overkill for Phred, who is obviously working mainly in
the Windows environment. And Microsoft Services for Unix (a free download)
is faster than Cygwin (for big jobs, where it makes a difference).

Not meant as a flame ;-), just a "huh??" kinda comment ....

Andrew
Anonymous
August 22, 2005 4:04:04 AM

Archived from groups: aus.computers,alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

WinZip requires payment of a license fee, which may put off some people. CygWin
and the Linux compression utilities are free, but somewhat cumbersome. 7-Zip is
also free and open source... Ben Myers

On 21 Aug 2005 23:31:40 GMT, Andrew Mclaren <email@address.com> wrote:

>Nicholas Andrade <sdnick484@nospam.yahoo.com> wrote:
>
>> Cygwin offers free CLI zip, gzip and bzip compressors and
>
>Not to start a religious war, but ... why would anyone install Cygwin, just
>to compress/uncompress some files?
>
>WinZip is an extremely widespread compression utility, and a native Win32
>application. It can unzip tar, .Z, .gz, .tgz, uuencoded and other common
>Unix formats, as well as common PC formats like ZIP and CAB. (The only
>thing it can't do is create new gzip archives).
>
>Likewise, the Windows Task Scheduler will be sufficient for the vast
>majority of users wanting to kick off batch proccesses at a certain time:
>you'd have to dig deep into cron to start using features that aren't there
>in Task Scheduler.
>
>Cygwin can be a useful package in the Unix-interop scenario, but it sounds
>way off-target and overkill for Phred, who is obviously working mainly in
>the Windows environment. And Microsoft Services for Unix (a free download)
>is faster than Cygwin (for big jobs, where it makes a difference).
>
>Not meant as a flame ;-), just a "huh??" kinda comment ....
>
>Andrew
Anonymous
August 22, 2005 4:10:36 AM

Archived from groups: aus.computers,alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Andrew Mclaren wrote:
> Nicholas Andrade <sdnick484@nospam.yahoo.com> wrote:
>
>
>>Cygwin offers free CLI zip, gzip and bzip compressors and
>
>
> Not to start a religious war, but ... why would anyone install Cygwin, just
> to compress/uncompress some files?
>
I agree it's a bit overkill, but it gets the job done and (unlike
Winzip) it's free.
>
> WinZip is an extremely widespread compression utility, and a native Win32
> application. It can unzip tar, .Z, .gz, .tgz, uuencoded and other common
> Unix formats, as well as common PC formats like ZIP and CAB. (The only
> thing it can't do is create new gzip archives).
>
WinZip is a good program, but I don't see any reason to throw money away
when there are free, open alternatives. The original poster seems to
already have Winzip (implied by, "able to handle ZIP format WinZIP files
in/out") and it's not beyond reason that the person was looking for
other alternatives.

> Likewise, the Windows Task Scheduler will be sufficient for the vast
> majority of users wanting to kick off batch proccesses at a certain time:
> you'd have to dig deep into cron to start using features that aren't there
> in Task Scheduler.
>
True, task scheduler may work fineb
>
> Cygwin can be a useful package in the Unix-interop scenario, but it sounds
> way off-target and overkill for Phred, who is obviously working mainly in
> the Windows environment. And Microsoft Services for Unix (a free download)
> is faster than Cygwin (for big jobs, where it makes a difference).
>
I've actually had the opposite experience using SFU (I started using it
at 3.5 when it became free, so perhaps the older versions performed
better). I'd also wager that the original poster wouldn't be too
unconfortable with Cygwin or SFU considering the original request was
for a program that works with command line interfaces.

> Not meant as a flame ;-), just a "huh??" kinda comment ....
>
Fair enough, I must don't think installing Cygwin with just the
compression utilities would be a significant install.

> Andrew
Anonymous
August 22, 2005 8:50:40 AM

Archived from groups: aus.computers,alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

On 22/08/05 00:34, Phred uttered the following...

>G'day mates,
>
>Any recommendations for a current generation command line
>"ZIP" archiver to run under Windows ME/XP please?
>
>It would need to be compatible with old PKZIP archives and able to
>handle ZIP format WinZIP files in/out.
>
>I want something that can be run from a batch file as well as directly
>from the command line, and "knows" about modern Windows file naming
>conventions and directory structures (and hard disk formats and sizes,
>if relevant in this context).
>
>It would need to handle the usual options relating to "updating",
>"extracting", storing path names or not, etc. etc.
>
>Thanks for reading.
>
>Cheers, Phred.
>
>
>
WinZip Command Line Support Add-On

http://www.winzip.com/prodpagecl.htm

--
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Anonymous
August 22, 2005 9:10:05 AM

Archived from groups: aus.computers,alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Phred <ppnerkDELETETHIS@yahoo.com> wrote

> Any recommendations for a current generation command
> line "ZIP" archiver to run under Windows ME/XP please?

Some of the common archivers have command line capability.

Cant remember off the top of my head just
which ones, but there is more than one.

> It would need to be compatible with old PKZIP archives
> and able to handle ZIP format WinZIP files in/out.

> I want something that can be run from a batch file as well
> as directly from the command line, and "knows" about modern
> Windows file naming conventions and directory structures
> (and hard disk formats and sizes, if relevant in this context).

> It would need to handle the usual options relating to "updating",
> "extracting", storing path names or not, etc. etc.
Anonymous
August 22, 2005 3:19:32 PM

Archived from groups: aus.computers,alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

> I've actually had the opposite experience using SFU (I started using
> it at 3.5 when it became free, so perhaps the older versions performed
> better). I'd also wager that the original poster wouldn't be too

Fair comments :-) Overall I've had good experiences with SFU, and ended up
ditching Cygwin. But Cygwin did have 2 advantages:
- it had its own X server; and
- runing in the Win32 subsystem, it was a bit more "seemless" than SFU
which is off in its own POSIX subsystem.

SFU also hard-codes permissions for the "Administrator" user; and I always
rename my Administrator account to something else, so I got some weird
errors there (was f^#*ing hard to find the cause :-).

But multithreaded performance of server apps is much better on SFU. Cygwin
seems to have some kind of mutex deep in its runtime (that big Cygwin.dll)
that serialises threads. May or may not be an issue, depending on your
application.

Anyway, I'm drifting far from compression utilities :-)))

Andrew
Anonymous
August 22, 2005 3:24:05 PM

Archived from groups: aus.computers,alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

> WinZip requires payment of a license fee, which may put off some
> people. CygWin and the Linux compression utilities are free, but
> somewhat cumbersome. 7-Zip is also free and open source... Ben Myers

Could be. I'm happy to use free software ... and I don't object to paying ~
$36 for a good piece of software, either. WinZip is pretty good value IMHO.

But if people have a deep objection to paying for software, then they
should stick to free software :-)
August 22, 2005 3:32:18 PM

Archived from groups: aus.computers,alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"Phred" <ppnerkDELETETHIS@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:3mrhjgF1881qbU1@individual.net...
> G'day mates,
>
> Any recommendations for a current generation command line
> "ZIP" archiver to run under Windows ME/XP please?
>
> It would need to be compatible with old PKZIP archives and able to
> handle ZIP format WinZIP files in/out.
>
> I want something that can be run from a batch file as well as directly
> from the command line, and "knows" about modern Windows file naming
> conventions and directory structures (and hard disk formats and sizes,
> if relevant in this context).
>
> It would need to handle the usual options relating to "updating",
> "extracting", storing path names or not, etc. etc.
>
> Thanks for reading.
>
> Cheers, Phred.
>
> --
> ppnerkDELETE@THISyahoo.com.INVALID

Winrar
>
Anonymous
August 22, 2005 5:10:45 PM

Archived from groups: aus.computers,alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Andrew Mclaren committed to the eternal aether...:

>> Any recommendations for a current generation command line
>> "ZIP" archiver to run under Windows ME/XP please?
>> It would need to be compatible with old PKZIP archives and able to
>> handle ZIP format WinZIP files in/out.
>
> WinZip has an optional command-line interface component. It's a free
> download:
>
> http://www.winzip.com/downcl.htm
>
> I've found WinZip handles 99% of the tasks I've thrown at it. It's as good
> as anything else.

Let me know if you want a key generator to remove the annoying registration
message.

Or if you register as "Andrew McLaren" the key will be 333C2214 and 968304
for the self extractor 8]
Anonymous
August 23, 2005 5:52:38 AM

Archived from groups: aus.computers,alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Andrew Mclaren wrote:

> But multithreaded performance of server apps is much better on SFU. Cygwin
> seems to have some kind of mutex deep in its runtime (that big Cygwin.dll)
> that serialises threads. May or may not be an issue, depending on your
> application.
>

That's probably the difference; I've never used Windows as a server OS
(as you could probably guess, I'm more of a unix fan) and the closest
thing I have to an SMP Windows machine is a dektop with hyperthreading.
I do work with about a hundred or so 2-12 way UltraSparc boxen running
Solaris 8 (and a few eight way Linux ones) and they handle multiple
threads quite nicely...
!