Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Is Intel 810-chipset incompatible with WIN XP

Last response: in Windows XP
Share
February 8, 2004 2:47:46 AM

My daughter's Dell Dimension L400c has the Intel® 810 chipset with an onboard video controller, i.e., the 810-chipset doesn't come with an external AGP-connector, since its graphics controller is within the chipset already. It seems that when XP Home Edition supplants WIN 98 SE, issues pop up with the video controller, the legacy USB controller and goodness knows what else.

Although countermeasures reduced the Mean-Time-Between-Crash-to-Reboot, I could never make the system truly stable. Disabling the onboard video controller and installing a PCI video card only prolonged the agony - and repeatedly failed in the end. After spending the better part of each of the last ten days fighting this anomaly, I am reduced to pleading for counsel.


"There are more airplanes in the ocean than there are submarines in the sky."<P ID="edit"><FONT SIZE=-1><EM>Edited by El_Pescador on 02/07/04 11:49 PM.</EM></FONT></P>
February 8, 2004 3:52:50 AM

WinXP has all the drivers needed for the Intel 810 chipset.
The problem you could be experiencing may be with the amount of memory you have available. The graphics controller in the 810 chipset uses system memory instead of dedicated graphics memory.
WinXP will run on your system with 256MB of PC100 SDRAM.
Optimally it will run with 512MB of PC100 SDRAM. Do not use more than 512MB on an 810 series motherboard. IIRC the 810 and the 815 chipset memory controller can only address a maximum of 512MB of memory.
Also the 400MHz Celeron will run WinXP but it will be a lot slower than using Win98se.
If you have at least 256MB of memory and you reformat the hard drive and reinstall WinXP you shouldn't have any problems. Also you shouldn't have to install any drivers for any of the hardware installed. WinXP should have all the drivers you require.

<font color=red><i>Doctor Hooter</i></font color=red> <A HREF="http://www.page3.com/" target="_new"><b>(·Y·)</b></A>
February 9, 2004 3:15:46 PM

My daughter had 512MB Dell-certified PC100 SDRAM installed. I am beginning to believe the Dell L400c MOBO only will function really well with proprietary software off the Dell Dimension Resource CD - unfortunately, only WIN 98SE and NT resources are included. I took a stab at the NT materials, but XP rejected them.

"There are more airplanes in the ocean than there are submarines in the sky."
Related resources
February 10, 2004 9:59:56 PM

Go to <A HREF="http://home.bellsouth.net/p/s/community.dll?ep=87&subpa..." target="_new">http://home.bellsouth.net/p/s/community.dll?ep=87&subpa...;/A> to see Dell Dimension L400c system instability revealed in detail for the first time when trying to install Windows XP Home Edition.

Those drivers at issue are the very latest downloaded from Intel. The drivers employed by Windows XP Home Edition on the very first boot-up are rock-solid stable - however, from then on out totally unacceptable system instability. I suspect this whole thing is more a Dell problem than an Intel or Microsoft problem, but after fighting it daily for almost two weeks I am about disheartened.

A really sharp dude suggested to me: "... Sign up at the forums at Tom's Hardware Guide and ask for help in the XP forum ... those guys like to share their knowledge ..."


"There are more airplanes in the ocean than there are submarines in the sky."<P ID="edit"><FONT SIZE=-1><EM>Edited by El_Pescador on 02/10/04 07:03 PM.</EM></FONT></P>
February 13, 2004 6:29:26 AM

My mistake all along was in trusting Dell to have something functional across the spectrum, but their current A05 BIOS version would not "handshake" with the requisite XP 810-chipset drivers from Intel - as a last resort, I went directly to Intel (which is actually counter to Intel's own counsel) only to find out support for the 810-chipset was discontinued - but, there was a "retiree" archive that held the latest applicable version (they are up to AA12 now). Popped that "suckah" in and all my troubles went away.



"There are more airplanes in the ocean than there are submarines in the sky."
February 13, 2004 1:44:45 PM

Here's a thought: I'm thinking you should try a fresh install. Any chance of you doing that? Somehow backing up you important data files, wiping the disk and doing an install?

I'm just not comfortable with the upgrade from 98, even though in theory it should work..

<pre> \|/
jlanka (. .)
___________oOOo_(_(_)_)_oOOo___________
</pre><p>
February 13, 2004 3:05:39 PM

Actually, I probably did ten or twelve fresh installs of XP Home Edition in the last two weeks ... LOL.

The key to all this hinges on WIN 98SE/810-chipset working in 32-bit mode, while WIN 2000 Pro and XP require 64-bits - and you have to got to Intel <i>(and not Dell)</i> to get a comprehensive set of modernized XP-compatible drivers across the board <b>along with the latest BIOS update from the archive of "retired" chipsets.</b>

WARNING: After installation, the Intel BIOS update had the <i>exact</i> same ID in AIDA32 as the Dell ID it replaced. Only by comparing the contents of the Dell and the Intel Flash BIOS diskettes can you actually see the difference.

"There are more airplanes in the ocean than there are submarines in the sky."<P ID="edit"><FONT SIZE=-1><EM>Edited by El_Pescador on 02/13/04 12:07 PM.</EM></FONT></P>
February 13, 2004 4:30:33 PM

Quote:
The key to all this hinges on WIN 98SE/810-chipset working in 32-bit mode, while WIN 2000 Pro and XP require 64-bits

what the? What you talkin about 64 bits?

<pre> \|/
jlanka (. .)
___________oOOo_(_(_)_)_oOOo___________
</pre><p>
February 14, 2004 2:42:22 PM

I dunno - that was the explanation offered in one of several dozen revelations received from Microsoft, Intel, Dell, <i>et al</i> - if I was smart enough to know what it meant, I would not have needed to post a plea for help on an Internet forum ... <b>LOL !!!</b>

My vague recollection is that the 64-bit facet was what derailed upgrades first to Windows 2000 Professional and then to XP Home Edition. Following installation with both OSs, random <i>"crash-to-reboot"</i> was evident in the first minute or two of any session, and although related primarily to graphics (<A HREF="http://home.bellsouth.net/p/s/community.dll?ep=87&subpa..." target="_new">http://home.bellsouth.net/p/s/community.dll?ep=87&subpa...;/A>), it seemed that the USB feature also was causing trips. That is why I wound up get a comprehensive set of drivers from Intel. One Microsoft Online Crash Analysis actually pinpointed the graphics problem and directed me to <A HREF="http://support.intel.com/support/go/81xoca" target="_new">http://support.intel.com/support/go/81xoca&lt;/A> - but all the other OCAs only stated driver error by unidentifiable device.

"There are more airplanes in the ocean than there are submarines in the sky."<P ID="edit"><FONT SIZE=-1><EM>Edited by El_Pescador on 02/14/04 12:57 PM.</EM></FONT></P>
!