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ioSafe Reveals ''Disaster-Proo'' External SSD

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January 5, 2010 8:35:52 PM

"Disaster-Proo"? In the headline? Really guys?
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18
Anonymous
January 5, 2010 8:38:07 PM

Disaster Proo? How about prooF reading before submitting.
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13
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January 5, 2010 8:39:08 PM

damn who needs this CIA?
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-1
January 5, 2010 8:53:47 PM

LOL Nobody proof reads Tom's anymore. Not even the Title!!

Sorta like the Billion vs Trillion mistake yesterday.
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January 5, 2010 8:56:11 PM

Thought it said disaster-poo drive.

Spell check much?
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8
January 5, 2010 9:03:56 PM

At the price, I'm surprised it doesn't have USB 3.0. At least it does offer a faster connection through eSATA...
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4
January 5, 2010 9:18:52 PM

So... if I put this in an oven @ 350*F+ it should survive right?
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January 5, 2010 9:50:07 PM

@englishprofessor
That would mean the folks writing for Tom's would actually have to do some work before they got paid. Can't have that.
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January 5, 2010 9:51:12 PM

Sounds like a great myth-busters episode if you ask me!
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3
January 5, 2010 10:42:38 PM

jerreeceLOL Nobody proof reads Tom's anymore


No, they apparently proo read.
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January 5, 2010 10:55:26 PM

JeBuSBrian@englishprofessorThat would mean the folks writing for Tom's would actually have to do some work before they got paid. Can't have that.


Actually, as far as I know there's no reason why it wouldn't survive. Most of the tiny PCB you see around in computer parts are reflow-soldered in huge industrial ovens using parts rated for more than 450+ degrees F. If you go that high, then sure the solder will melt and the tiny smc will fall off but other than that, you'd have a better chance at breaking one of these by giving it to an 8 year old who likes to plug a battery into anything with a socket.
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January 5, 2010 10:56:27 PM

Damn counter-intuitive interface!
I quoted the wrong guy... Above reply was meant for Shadow703793
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January 5, 2010 11:34:56 PM

Sounds good, but obviously SSD capacities have to continue to grow before it can really be used for content back-up as described in the article.

With more and more users backing up in the cloud these days, this drive is either too little too late for too much, or they plan on just targeting users with very confidential data. The company is called, "ioSafe" after all.
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January 5, 2010 11:37:28 PM

"eternal drive"? ioSafe's marketing department will be loving these guys.
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January 6, 2010 3:01:23 AM

You already reviewed this.
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January 6, 2010 9:21:26 AM

all I need is a sledge hammer :D 
oh #$#$ I slipped and hit the sdd with a sledge hammer
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January 6, 2010 9:58:30 AM

Tom's don't need to spell-check or proof-read

They have ton's of self-appointed, anal-retentive regulars who do it for them...
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January 6, 2010 12:46:50 PM

I wouldn't pay $499 to protect my "special movies" (and I would need more than 64GB), but I guess it's a great solution for small and medium businesses.

I find it surprising that it can survive a 2.5-ton crush but not a drop from 21 feet???
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1
January 6, 2010 1:05:00 PM

homrqtcan it survive lava?

It can, but when the lava cools the only way you can get it back is to use explosives or pneumatic drills. They destroy the data unfortunately. You could of course wait for natural errosion over the next 3000 years to wear away the rock and retrieve your data. But don't worry, your great, great, great, great, great, great, great, great, great, great, great, great, great, great, great, grandkids will be able to see your stupid holiday pics a treat...
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January 6, 2010 2:28:48 PM

Its 2010, $1000+ product and its USB 2.0?
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2
January 6, 2010 3:43:16 PM

good place to store my porn.
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1
January 6, 2010 3:44:30 PM

Looks like I need to buy some $30 fire safes from Wal-Mart, stick some $100 64 GB flash drives in there and sell them for $500.
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2
!