Access Point or Router

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

This has been puzzling me for a while, why would one buy an AP over a
router since the router provides the more functionality in addition to
what the AP already offers when configured correctly. Yet, routers cost
less. What is the advantage of an AP, do they offer more range
typically? I'm looking to add one to my home networking, since right now
I'm only using an ad-hoc setup to provide access to my wired network for
my laptop through another wifi card on a wired computer. Any suggestions
on what I should do to increase signal range, excluding moving stuff
about or buying an antenna/relayer. What brands/models offer the best
range in addition to whether a router or an AP would be better in terms
of range. Thanks.

Elliot English
6 answers Last reply
More about access point router
  1. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    > This has been puzzling me for a while, why would one buy an AP over a
    > router since the router provides the more functionality in addition to
    > what the AP already offers when configured correctly. Yet, routers cost

    Um, because I already have a router?!

    Or how about, because there's not enough coverage from the router
    located badly where the cable/dsl enters the property so use another AP
    elsewhere.

    David.
  2. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    On Mon, 5 Jul 2004 08:07:44 +0100, David Taylor <djtaylor@bigfoot.com>
    wrote:
    >
    >Or how about, because there's not enough coverage from the router
    >located badly where the cable/dsl enters the property so use another AP
    >elsewhere.


    Is an AP hard wired to the router? Or, how are they connected?

    My router is at one end of my house and I am unable to connect when at
    the other end and looking for a solution to improve my signal strength
    throughout the house.

    TIA
  3. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    http://www.smallbusinesscomputing.com/webmaster/print.php/1607711
    WLAN Routers vs. APs
    There may be some confusion over the difference between WLAN routers
    and access points. The main thing to remember is that access points
    allow wireless clients access to a single network, while WLAN routers
    allow clients to browse a number of different networks. The router
    always takes the IP address into account to make decisions on how to
    forward (i.e., route) the packet; whereas, access points generally
    ignore the IP address and forward all packets.

    In addition, WLAN routers implement the Network Address Translation
    (NAT) protocol that enables multiple network devices to share a single
    IP address, which are generally provided by the Internet service
    provider (ISP). WLAN routers also have the ability to provide
    port-based control, firewall management and Dynamic Host Configuration
    Protocol (DHCP) services for all devices. These functions make the
    WLAN router much more versatile than an access point.


    On Mon, 05 Jul 2004 05:42:10 GMT, Elliot English
    <eenglish_ca@yahoo.ca> wrote:

    >This has been puzzling me for a while, why would one buy an AP over a
    >router since the router provides the more functionality in addition to
    >what the AP already offers when configured correctly. Yet, routers cost
    >less. What is the advantage of an AP, do they offer more range
    >typically? I'm looking to add one to my home networking, since right now
    >I'm only using an ad-hoc setup to provide access to my wired network for
    >my laptop through another wifi card on a wired computer. Any suggestions
    >on what I should do to increase signal range, excluding moving stuff
    >about or buying an antenna/relayer. What brands/models offer the best
    >range in addition to whether a router or an AP would be better in terms
    >of range. Thanks.
    >
    >Elliot English
  4. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    On Mon, 05 Jul 2004 12:51:38 GMT, Doug Jamal spoketh

    >http://www.smallbusinesscomputing.com/webmaster/print.php/1607711
    >WLAN Routers vs. APs
    >There may be some confusion over the difference between WLAN routers
    >and access points. The main thing to remember is that access points
    >allow wireless clients access to a single network, while WLAN routers
    >allow clients to browse a number of different networks. The router
    >always takes the IP address into account to make decisions on how to
    >forward (i.e., route) the packet; whereas, access points generally
    >ignore the IP address and forward all packets.
    >
    >In addition, WLAN routers implement the Network Address Translation
    >(NAT) protocol that enables multiple network devices to share a single
    >IP address, which are generally provided by the Internet service
    >provider (ISP). WLAN routers also have the ability to provide
    >port-based control, firewall management and Dynamic Host Configuration
    >Protocol (DHCP) services for all devices. These functions make the
    >WLAN router much more versatile than an access point.
    >


    This is not very accurate. A wireless access point grants wireless
    clients the same access to networks as any wired client has. So, if
    there are several subnets (routed or bridge) on the LAN, then any client
    (wired or wireless) will have the same access to all subnets (unless
    specific rules exists saying otherwise).

    A "wireless router" is a misnomer. With very few exceptions, they don't
    do any "wireless routing". It's simply a two-in-one unit; a router and a
    wireless access point. Also, the wireless routers have limitations WRT
    their wireless functions. IIRC, they'll function only as an AP, while
    many APs can be configured as bridges, repeaters and clients.

    Lars M. Hansen
    http://www.hansenonline.net
    (replace 'badnews' with 'news' in e-mail address)
  5. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    A wireless router is four devices: a wireless access point, an Ethernet
    switch, a layer 2 bridge between 802.3 and 802.11, and a router.

    You can use it as a pure Ethernet switch, a pure access point, a bridged
    local network, or a routed, bridged local network.

    "Lars M. Hansen" <badnews@hansenonline.net> wrote in message
    news:fdpie01hr2n6vvv1ba722o8q4b4jqr4i1d@4ax.com...
    > On Mon, 05 Jul 2004 12:51:38 GMT, Doug Jamal spoketh
    >
    > >http://www.smallbusinesscomputing.com/webmaster/print.php/1607711
    > >WLAN Routers vs. APs
    > >There may be some confusion over the difference between WLAN routers
    > >and access points. The main thing to remember is that access points
    > >allow wireless clients access to a single network, while WLAN routers
    > >allow clients to browse a number of different networks. The router
    > >always takes the IP address into account to make decisions on how to
    > >forward (i.e., route) the packet; whereas, access points generally
    > >ignore the IP address and forward all packets.
    > >
    > >In addition, WLAN routers implement the Network Address Translation
    > >(NAT) protocol that enables multiple network devices to share a single
    > >IP address, which are generally provided by the Internet service
    > >provider (ISP). WLAN routers also have the ability to provide
    > >port-based control, firewall management and Dynamic Host Configuration
    > >Protocol (DHCP) services for all devices. These functions make the
    > >WLAN router much more versatile than an access point.
    > >
    >
    >
    > This is not very accurate. A wireless access point grants wireless
    > clients the same access to networks as any wired client has. So, if
    > there are several subnets (routed or bridge) on the LAN, then any client
    > (wired or wireless) will have the same access to all subnets (unless
    > specific rules exists saying otherwise).
    >
    > A "wireless router" is a misnomer. With very few exceptions, they don't
    > do any "wireless routing". It's simply a two-in-one unit; a router and a
    > wireless access point. Also, the wireless routers have limitations WRT
    > their wireless functions. IIRC, they'll function only as an AP, while
    > many APs can be configured as bridges, repeaters and clients.
    >
    > Lars M. Hansen
    > http://www.hansenonline.net
    > (replace 'badnews' with 'news' in e-mail address)
  6. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    > Is an AP hard wired to the router? Or, how are they connected?

    Depends! You would normally add a wired AP off the router or depending on brands you might be able to wirelessly repeat the wireless signal off the router.

    David.
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