WSG 4000 vs. Instant Hotspot vs. ZyAir B-4000

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

All of these boxes appear to be the same product.

Are they?

Who really makes them?

Any actual difference?

Any better products out there?

Thanks,

Brew
5 answers Last reply
More about 4000 instant hotspot zyair 4000
  1. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    On 5 Jul 2004 09:12:46 -0700, brewerja@yahoo.com (brewgle) wrote:

    >All of these boxes appear to be the same product.

    What boxes. Oh, I see. I'm suppose to cut and paste them from the
    subject. Could I trouble you in the future to accomidate those few
    that prefer all the useful information in the body of the message
    instead of scattered in the title, signature, attachments, and VCF?

    >Are they?

    Dunno. The easy way to trace the lineage of these devices is to
    obtain the FCC ID number from the box and research their FCC filings.
    http://www.fcc.gov/oet/fccid/
    https://gullfoss2.fcc.gov/prod/oet/cf/eas/reports/GenericSearch.cfm
    Warning: It's really slow and tricky to use. It's also difficult to
    search by manufacturer. The PDF files tend to be huge.

    >Who really makes them?

    Dunno. The FCC ID search failed to find anything for WSG, Instant
    Hotspot, and ZyAir. The FCC numbers would be a big help. Ahah!
    ftp://ftp.zyxel.com/ZyAIR_B-4000/document/ZyAIR_B-4000_FCCDOC_Certification.jpg
    Ugh. That didn't work.

    Just type "Zyxel" in the manufactures field in the FCC ID generic
    search page, wait forever, and you'll get a list of 58 of their
    products. Of course, there's no way to navigate directly to the last
    page, so you have to slog your way through 5 incredibly slow pages. I
    couldn't find anything that matched a model number of B-4000.
    However, when I went through some of the photos trying to find a
    likely match, I found that many of the circuit boards shown has
    "Zygate" inscribed on the silk screening and on the test reports which
    implies that they at least make some of their own hardware. Lots of
    the pictures were corrupted so I wasn't able to check for similar
    products. Decoding the numbering system, I would think that the FCC
    ID should be I88-B4000. However, nothing shows up on the search. I
    would question whether it has passed FCC and can be sold.

    I'll let you do the digging for WSG and Instant Hotspot.

    >Any actual difference?

    >Any better products out there?

    Lacking proper disclosure, I deduce that you're building a coffee shop
    hotspot. I've rolled my own using replacement firmware for Linksys
    WRT54G routers. However, they were for free hotspots so a billing
    system wasn't necessary. I've found that including snort in the
    firmware is a big help with security (to prevent someone from using
    the coffee shop for spamming). I didn't see any of that on the data
    sheets.


    --
    Jeff Liebermann jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
    150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
    Santa Cruz CA 95060 AE6KS 831-336-2558
  2. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Jeff,
    As a first-class-smart-a$$ myself, I appreciate you sarcasm.

    I also appreciate that you put an effort into finding answers.

    Yes, I'm putting hotspots in some businesses.

    No, billing is really not an issue. My biggest desire is to have
    users initially redirected to a designated page, then let them go
    free. Oh, and I want the wireless folks to never see the hardwired
    network.

    I have read a bit about the WRT54G mods and I believe the splashpage
    part is part of the package. I don't know if all the effort is worth
    it. Any feedback here?

    Brew


    Jeff Liebermann <jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us> wrote in message news:<a30je0dd1ajq1048uvie4r7stkpd6cpmi3@4ax.com>...
    > On 5 Jul 2004 09:12:46 -0700, brewerja@yahoo.com (brewgle) wrote:
    >
    > >All of these boxes appear to be the same product.
    >
    > What boxes. Oh, I see. I'm suppose to cut and paste them from the
    > subject. Could I trouble you in the future to accomidate those few
    > that prefer all the useful information in the body of the message
    > instead of scattered in the title, signature, attachments, and VCF?
    >
    > >Are they?
    >
    > Dunno. The easy way to trace the lineage of these devices is to
    > obtain the FCC ID number from the box and research their FCC filings.
    > http://www.fcc.gov/oet/fccid/
    > https://gullfoss2.fcc.gov/prod/oet/cf/eas/reports/GenericSearch.cfm
    > Warning: It's really slow and tricky to use. It's also difficult to
    > search by manufacturer. The PDF files tend to be huge.
    >
    > >Who really makes them?
    >
    > Dunno. The FCC ID search failed to find anything for WSG, Instant
    > Hotspot, and ZyAir. The FCC numbers would be a big help. Ahah!
    > ftp://ftp.zyxel.com/ZyAIR_B-4000/document/ZyAIR_B-4000_FCCDOC_Certification.jpg
    > Ugh. That didn't work.
    >
    > Just type "Zyxel" in the manufactures field in the FCC ID generic
    > search page, wait forever, and you'll get a list of 58 of their
    > products. Of course, there's no way to navigate directly to the last
    > page, so you have to slog your way through 5 incredibly slow pages. I
    > couldn't find anything that matched a model number of B-4000.
    > However, when I went through some of the photos trying to find a
    > likely match, I found that many of the circuit boards shown has
    > "Zygate" inscribed on the silk screening and on the test reports which
    > implies that they at least make some of their own hardware. Lots of
    > the pictures were corrupted so I wasn't able to check for similar
    > products. Decoding the numbering system, I would think that the FCC
    > ID should be I88-B4000. However, nothing shows up on the search. I
    > would question whether it has passed FCC and can be sold.
    >
    > I'll let you do the digging for WSG and Instant Hotspot.
    >
    > >Any actual difference?
    >
    > >Any better products out there?
    >
    > Lacking proper disclosure, I deduce that you're building a coffee shop
    > hotspot. I've rolled my own using replacement firmware for Linksys
    > WRT54G routers. However, they were for free hotspots so a billing
    > system wasn't necessary. I've found that including snort in the
    > firmware is a big help with security (to prevent someone from using
    > the coffee shop for spamming). I didn't see any of that on the data
    > sheets.
  3. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    On 5 Jul 2004 15:47:31 -0700, brewerja@yahoo.com (brewgle) wrote:

    >As a first-class-smart-a$$ myself, I appreciate you sarcasm.

    Sorry, I lack subtlety, tact, remourse, diplomacy, and netiquette.
    It's much easier to deliver a sane answer if you kindly disclose what
    you are trying to accomplish. Many people paint themselves into a
    corner and only ask how long it takes for the paint to dry, rather
    than ask for help on painting the floor.

    >I also appreciate that you put an effort into finding answers.

    I spend quite a bit of time on the FCC web pile looking at photos of
    boxes and reading test reports. Lots of schematics, block diagrams,
    and real specifications. Anyway, I trashed about 2 hours trying to
    find the Zyxel (ZyAir) B-4000. Nothing.

    >Yes, I'm putting hotspots in some businesses.

    Yep. Lots of ways to do that. See list below.

    >No, billing is really not an issue. My biggest desire is to have
    >users initially redirected to a designated page, then let them go
    >free.

    That's a common feature where port 80 gets redirected to local web
    server with a signup page. See NoCatAuth at:
    http://nocat.net

    >Oh, and I want the wireless folks to never see the hardwired
    >network.

    Swell. I posted a rant on various ways to do that last week. Digging
    on Google:

    http://www.google.com/groups?selm=ok6rd05dskhorur3v4hndmpsfn36mt7v2o%404ax.com
    There are probably other ways, but those are the ones I concocted for
    the ocassion.

    >I have read a bit about the WRT54G mods and I believe the splashpage
    >part is part of the package. I don't know if all the effort is worth
    >it. Any feedback here?

    We have a group using those for free hotspots in the People's
    Republiic of Santa Cruz at:
    http://www.thirdbreak.org
    Lots of other people doing it judging by the huge traffic on various
    mailing list. It does have one advantage in that it concentrates
    quite a bit of server related features into the access point for very
    little cost. That's not the way I like to do things. I prefer a
    brain dead wireless bridge connected to a more intelligent and
    capeable server. Having the radio seperate from the
    router/firewall/authentication/yadah-yadah allows versatility,
    flexibility in choice of radio, and ease of locating the radio (away
    from the router/switch where all the CAT5 LAN wires meet).

    WRT54G router links.
    http://www.portless.net/ewrt/index.html
    http://openwrt.ksilebo.net
    http://www.seattlewireless.net/index.cgi/LinksysWrt54g
    http://www.batbox.org/wrt54g-linux.html
    http://nocat.net/wiki/
    http://wifi-box.sourceforge.net

    Another all your eggs in one box solution are SBC (single board
    computahs) designed for wireless applications. One such manufacturer
    is conventiently located in the People Replublic of Santa Cruz (so
    they get a plug):
    http://www.soekris.com
    One to three ethernet ports, one or two radios, compact flash
    filesystem, runs Linux, fairly cheap. Also used by BAWRN (Bay Area
    Wireless Reseach Network):
    http://www.barwn.org/docs/BARWN_outdoor_router.pdf
    There are other boards that will work but this is the only one I've
    played with.

    What I've been doing is fairly weird. I find that strip malls with
    coffee shops tend to have neighboring shops that want internet access
    but don't want to see each others networks. The usual and most
    expensive solution is to get 5ea static IP's and 5 routers shared on
    one DSL line. For routers, I've been using Freesco:
    http://www.freesco.org
    which supports up to 10 ethernet cards. The 802.11b wireless gets one
    port. Bluetooth gets another. Metricom goes on the serial port (PPP
    login). The other ports go to various seperate businesses. DHCP
    delivers seperate class c IP blocks to each business and radio.

    If that sounds like too much work or too messy, there are ready to run
    solutions on Sourceforge.net. Go to:
    http://sourceforge.net/search
    and inscribe the word "hotspot" as the seach key. Looks like 5 good
    and 5 more so-so solutions.

    Gotta run...

    --
    Jeff Liebermann jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
    150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
    Santa Cruz CA 95060 AE6KS 831-336-2558
  4. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    On Mon, 05 Jul 2004 17:12:05 -0700, Jeff Liebermann
    <jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us> wrote:

    >>Oh, and I want the wireless folks to never see the hardwired
    >>network.
    >
    >Swell. I posted a rant on various ways to do that last week. Digging
    >on Google:
    >
    >http://www.google.com/groups?selm=ok6rd05dskhorur3v4hndmpsfn36mt7v2o%404ax.com
    >There are probably other ways, but those are the ones I concocted for
    >the ocassion.

    Here's another way to seperate the public and private LAN's.
    One routeable IP address. Two routers. Double NAT. Ugly, but worth
    considering:
    http://www.publicip.net/index_sub.php?show=gateway&from=hotspots


    --
    Jeff Liebermann jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
    150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
    Santa Cruz CA 95060 AE6KS 831-336-2558
  5. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    here's what I found when I was looking around
    to see how Panera Bread was installing their free hotspots
    with the ability to handle any IP address and the various
    port/protocols -
    I think Panera was using the Orinoco AP2500 -
    http://www.goqgo.com/ComparePlatforms.html
    If you have a Panera Bread Wifi anywhere near you,
    give it a try -
    Here's the single box that Panera Bread and others are using -
    It looks pretty amazing, with everything you really need
    to setup a wireless hotspot -
    It is the Orinoco AP-2500 access point -
    --
    Here's the answer - and the hardware they are using :)
    <http://www.proxim.com/products/wifi/ap/ap2500/>
    Phil -
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