Do I need several routers to cover a house?

Archived from groups: comp.os.ms-windows.networking.misc,comp.os.linux.networking,alt.internet.wireless,microsoft.public.win2000.networking (More info?)

I am setting up a wireless network for a two level house (5 rooms on
each floor).

1) What do I need to look for in a router to cover the whole house?
Where should it be located?

2) Do I need several?

3) What are the general characteristics a wireless newbie (but an
otherwise very techinically astute geek) should look for?

4) I would like to make the setup secure but I keep reading everywhere
that it's an enourmous hassle. Is that true or is it only a hassle for
non-technical people?

Thanks!

- Jeff
5 answers Last reply
More about routers cover house
  1. Archived from groups: comp.os.ms-windows.networking.misc,comp.os.linux.networking,alt.internet.wireless,microsoft.public.win2000.networking (More info?)

    "Jeff Lanfield" <jlanfield2003@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:235c483f.0407101708.349ffa75@posting.google.com...
    > I am setting up a wireless network for a two level house (5 rooms on
    > each floor).
    >
    > 1) What do I need to look for in a router to cover the whole house?
    > Where should it be located?

    The highest point in the house if possible.

    >
    > 2) Do I need several?

    You can use WAP(s) if need be as a repeater to cover an area.

    >
    > 3) What are the general characteristics a wireless newbie (but an
    > otherwise very techinically astute geek) should look for?

    Wireless air wave interference that will degrade or prevent reception.

    >
    > 4) I would like to make the setup secure but I keep reading everywhere
    > that it's an enourmous hassle. Is that true or is it only a hassle for
    > non-technical people?

    There are plenty of articles out on Google on how to secure a wireless setup
    in the home.

    Must you cross post to the world?

    Duane :)
  2. Archived from groups: comp.os.ms-windows.networking.misc,comp.os.linux.networking,alt.internet.wireless,microsoft.public.win2000.networking (More info?)

    One wireless router will be fine. Get a 802.11g [54 Mbps] router that can do
    preshared key WPA as most of them now can do though you will need a wireless nic that
    either can work with the XP Pro WPA supplicant or one that has the ability to use it
    with other operating systems. I have a D-Link 524 and a SMC2804WBR. Both are
    802.11b/g and are dirt cheap after rebates. The SMC included a SPI firewall and can
    even do 802.1x authentication with a radius server such as a W2K server running IAS
    that I got it to work with using EAP TLS certificate authentication. Both worked well
    with WPA using pre shared key authentication and tkip key management for stronger
    security than WEP. My old D-Link DWL-650+ wireless nic worked well with WPA pre
    shared key, but that was only on my laptop using Windows XP. WPA using preshared key
    is very easy to set up - easier than the old WEP was.

    Your biggest challenge will be to find wireless cards that will do it for the
    operating systems that you use. Unfortunately the documentation from the manufactures
    is terrible on setting up WPA for network cards. As far as I can tell hardly none of
    them have updated their manuals, that are available at their websites, on what the
    exact procedures are. If it fairly easy using XP as you can use the built in wireless
    configuration but you have to use their utility programs for Windows 2000 or other
    operating systems if supported. All the current wireless gear will at least support
    WEP to give some degree of security. WEP is not all that bad as a lot of data has to
    be captured to crack a wep key and if you are on the internet with a secure tunnel to
    a https site using ssl you have that encryption also. If you can locate your router
    somewhere near the center of the house, that will work well. I have mine in the
    basement towards one end and we still get a strong signal anywhere, even on the
    second floor. NewEgg [at link below] is a good place to browse and buy wireless or
    any gear.--- Steve

    http://www.newegg.com/network/?DEPA=5

    "Jeff Lanfield" <jlanfield2003@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:235c483f.0407101708.349ffa75@posting.google.com...
    > I am setting up a wireless network for a two level house (5 rooms on
    > each floor).
    >
    > 1) What do I need to look for in a router to cover the whole house?
    > Where should it be located?
    >
    > 2) Do I need several?
    >
    > 3) What are the general characteristics a wireless newbie (but an
    > otherwise very techinically astute geek) should look for?
    >
    > 4) I would like to make the setup secure but I keep reading everywhere
    > that it's an enourmous hassle. Is that true or is it only a hassle for
    > non-technical people?
    >
    > Thanks!
    >
    > - Jeff
  3. Archived from groups: comp.os.ms-windows.networking.misc,comp.os.linux.networking,alt.internet.wireless,microsoft.public.win2000.networking (More info?)

    jlanfield2003@yahoo.com (Jeff Lanfield) wrote in
    news:235c483f.0407101708.349ffa75@posting.google.com:

    > 1) What do I need to look for in a router to cover the whole
    > house? Where should it be located?

    I assuming you are looking for a combined router / switch / wireless
    access point. Most of the major consumer brands (D-Link, Netgear,
    Linksys, Belkin, USR, 3Com, SMC etc) are similar in specification and
    performance.

    To get the best wireless coverage and the best security, a wireless
    router should be in the centre of the property. However, this may not
    be convenient - it depends on where your phone line or cable
    connection terminates, where you have extension wiring, or if for
    example you want to connect (say) several PCs close to each other
    with wired connections.

    > 2) Do I need several?

    I have a large old house (v. thoick walls!) with 5 rooms on each
    floor. I get excellent coverage throughout the house and 30m away
    from a wireless router at the front of the property.

    You will only need more than one device if there is a weak or low
    quality signal at a point where you want to place a computer.

    You can fill in gaps in coverage with a repeater, or with an
    additional access point wired to your router. Or - cheaper - fit
    higher gain antennae (say 5dBi to replace the stock 2dBi gain
    antennae) on the router and/or wireless cards in PCs.

    Suggest that you don't but all your kit at once: buy the router +
    modem (as required) and use a wireless laptop to undertake a site
    survey. Walk round the house and check the signal levels, using
    either the utility which comes with the laptop card or a copy of
    NetStumbler (which will work with most cards under WinXP).

    > 3) What are the general characteristics a wireless newbie (but an
    > otherwise very techinically astute geek) should look for?

    As I said, most of the consumer brands are similar. Suggest you go by
    personal recommendation and reports of service quality from the
    manufacturer. A good place to start (you're in the US?) is likely
    the forums at <http://www.dslreports.com/>. I'm in the UK; the best
    place there is <http://www.adslguide.org.uk/>.

    Each brand has a mix of happy and unhappy users; remember that people
    who post to such forums usually have problems while the (larger
    number of) happy users stay silent - it's easy to get a distorted
    view...

    > 4) I would like to make the setup secure but I keep reading
    > everywhere that it's an enourmous hassle. Is that true or is it
    > only a hassle for non-technical people?

    No, it's straightforward. If your router and cards support WPA, use
    it. If they support WEP, use that instead. WPA is considerably more
    secure than WEP, but any form of encryption will deter all but the
    most determined and technically knowledgeable.

    There may be debate, but techniques such as disabling SSID broadcast
    are bogus forms of security. Similarly MAC access control will
    provide little or no security. Encryption is the best form of
    wireless security - others are readily overcome.

    Hope this helps

    PS: For what it's worth I have an fairly extensive network which
    supports two home-based businesses and family use. I use D-Link
    equipment and am satisfied with its price and performance. I have had
    little or no problem in over a year of wireless use, and I have
    multiple PCs, laptops, servers, print servers, an iMac and a PS2
    ganes console.

    --

    Richard Perkin
    To email me, change the AT in the address below
    richard.perkinATmyrealbox.com

    It's is not, it isn't ain't, and it's it's, not its, if you mean it
    is. If you don't, it's its. Then too, it's hers. It isn't her's.
    It isn't our's either. It's ours, and likewise yours and theirs.
    -- Oxford University Press, Edpress News
  4. Archived from groups: comp.os.ms-windows.networking.misc,comp.os.linux.networking,alt.internet.wireless,microsoft.public.win2000.networking (More info?)

    jlanfield2003@yahoo.com (Jeff Lanfield) writes:

    ]I am setting up a wireless network for a two level house (5 rooms on
    ]each floor).

    ]1) What do I need to look for in a router to cover the whole house?
    ]Where should it be located?

    as centerally as possible.


    ]2) Do I need several?

    Depends on the size of th ehouse, the material the house is built of (eg if
    all the walls are copper clad, you may need one in every room). Buy one and
    try it.


    ]3) What are the general characteristics a wireless newbie (but an
    ]otherwise very techinically astute geek) should look for?

    ]4) I would like to make the setup secure but I keep reading everywhere
    ]that it's an enourmous hassle. Is that true or is it only a hassle for
    ]non-technical people?

    The problem is that the signal extends well outside your house. that may or
    may not be a problem. If it is, then you will have to make sure that you
    use the highest level of encryption offered.
  5. Archived from groups: comp.os.ms-windows.networking.misc,comp.os.linux.networking,alt.internet.wireless,microsoft.public.win2000.networking (More info?)

    "Jeff Lanfield" <jlanfield2003@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:235c483f.0407101708.349ffa75@posting.google.com...
    > I am setting up a wireless network for a two level house (5 rooms on
    > each floor).
    >
    > 1) What do I need to look for in a router to cover the whole house?
    > Where should it be located?
    >
    Depends on model. My AP in the upper corner of the house (two floors, 4/5
    rooms per floor) reaches fine but it will depend on the router and the
    NIC's. A usb nic which can be placed away from the computer may do better
    than a PCI based one.

    > 2) Do I need several?
    >
    depends on the quality of the router and the NICs

    > 3) What are the general characteristics a wireless newbie (but an
    > otherwise very techinically astute geek) should look for?
    >
    > 4) I would like to make the setup secure but I keep reading everywhere
    > that it's an enourmous hassle. Is that true or is it only a hassle for
    > non-technical people?
    >
    security is important but in your home may not be an issue. If you can't get
    the information to the whole house, hard for someone on the street to do so.
    I've done a walk around my lot and no leakage so I don't bother. My
    neighbors router is stronger and he uses WEP. I do have MAC level control
    enabled. While someone can intercept what my wireless devices are seeing,
    they can't log onto the network. A few passwords are passed but I'd notice
    someone sitting outside my house since I know all the neighbors cars.

    > Thanks!
    >
    > - Jeff


    ---
    Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
    Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
    Version: 6.0.717 / Virus Database: 473 - Release Date: 7/9/04
Ask a new question

Read More

Wireless Routers Networking Wireless Networking