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Dell laptop DC power jack pinout

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Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 17, 2005 4:43:52 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Hi,
I'm attempting to wire in a different DC power jack (the original broke
and direct replacements are not available except by purchasing a new
motherboard) on an Inspiron 8600 and thought that it would be a rather
straight forward project. The size N coaxial power jacks available at
Radio Shack will fit nicely in the chassis in place of the original. As
I was determining voltages and polarity of the power plug I was
surprised to find a second voltage present. I have voltages of
approximately 8VDC and 20VDC present with one common lead. On the plug
end the 8 volts is from the center pin to center barrel and 20 volts
from center barrel to outer sleeve (which I assumed was just an RF
shield). Can any one enlighten me what's going on with the second
voltage? Any one care to share their story of a successful resolution
to a broken power connector on this model (third party replacement jacks
are available for other models)?

By the way, I've heard the same jack is found on Inspiron 5150, 8500,
500m, 600m, and Latitude D500,
D600, D800.

Thanks,
Al T
Spokane, WA

--
-- All incoming and outgoing mail is checked with Norton AntiVirus
2005 --
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 18, 2005 1:12:38 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"Al T." <itspersonal@comcast.net> wrote:
>I'm attempting to wire in a different DC power jack (the original broke
>and direct replacements are not available except by purchasing a new
>motherboard) on an Inspiron 8600 and thought that it would be a rather
>straight forward project.

You've discovered the third power supply connector for modern Dell
laptops. This third lead is used for communications between the power
supply and the laptop, so that the laptop can ensure it's got a valid,
legal, OEM Dell power supply, and what it's power capacity is.

I have no idea what the communications protocol between the two is,
but I know Dell laptops will reduce charging current (and extend
charge time) when operated with 65W instead of 90W power supplies,
will refuse to charge if operated from a non Dell supply, etc.

Let us know if you find out anything else!
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 18, 2005 2:04:21 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

<William P. N. Smith> wrote in message
news:1hfpi11mu7i44650nf4ff1fv5eie8u09nk@4ax.com...
> "Al T." <itspersonal@comcast.net> wrote:
>>I'm attempting to wire in a different DC power jack (the original
>>broke
>>and direct replacements are not available except by purchasing a new
>>motherboard) on an Inspiron 8600 and thought that it would be a rather
>>straight forward project.
>
> You've discovered the third power supply connector for modern Dell
> laptops. This third lead is used for communications between the power
> supply and the laptop, so that the laptop can ensure it's got a valid,
> legal, OEM Dell power supply, and what it's power capacity is.
>
> I have no idea what the communications protocol between the two is,
> but I know Dell laptops will reduce charging current (and extend
> charge time) when operated with 65W instead of 90W power supplies,
> will refuse to charge if operated from a non Dell supply, etc.
>
> Let us know if you find out anything else!

Thanks for the reply, William. Now I have conflicting stories as to
whether or not it will charge with the center pin broken or not
connected. I read a post of an instance on an 800D where the center pin
completely broke off and yet the AC adapter continued to function,
albeit with "Unrecognized Power Adapter" messages. I also had a reply
this evening on a Dell sponsored forum that one can disable such
messages in the BIOS 'Adapter Warnings: Enable/Disable' option. Leading
me to hope that I can get by without tying in that odd pin and just
using the 20 volts. As a last resort I can always hardwire the adapter
to the MB or use an ungainly external 3 lead connector wired to the MB
but of course would rather not. Guess I'll try the coaxial connector
without the center pin and see if it'll work since it fits so well and
looks like it belongs there. I'll drop a note with the end results but
it may be a couple of weeks before it gets reassembled and tested.

Thanks,
Al T.
Spokane,WA
Related resources
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 18, 2005 12:30:16 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"Al T." <itspersonal@comcast.net> wrote:
>I read a post of an instance on an 800D where the center pin
>completely broke off and yet the AC adapter continued to function,
>albeit with "Unrecognized Power Adapter" messages.

Let us know how it works, and if it will charge the battery in that
state. IME it will operate, but refuse to charge the battery with a
non-Dell supply.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 20, 2005 12:22:09 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

You can get a kit that converts your laptop and your adapter to a different
jack here: http://www.computekinc.us/dell_project.htm

I have ordered jacks from them and they have good service.


"Al T." <itspersonal@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:QvudnT1mOsBs7LHenZ2dnUVZ_sudnZ2d@comcast.com...
> Hi,
> I'm attempting to wire in a different DC power jack (the original broke
> and direct replacements are not available except by purchasing a new
> motherboard) on an Inspiron 8600 and thought that it would be a rather
> straight forward project. The size N coaxial power jacks available at
> Radio Shack will fit nicely in the chassis in place of the original. As I
> was determining voltages and polarity of the power plug I was surprised to
> find a second voltage present. I have voltages of approximately 8VDC and
> 20VDC present with one common lead. On the plug end the 8 volts is from
> the center pin to center barrel and 20 volts from center barrel to outer
> sleeve (which I assumed was just an RF shield). Can any one enlighten me
> what's going on with the second voltage? Any one care to share their
> story of a successful resolution to a broken power connector on this model
> (third party replacement jacks are available for other models)?
>
> By the way, I've heard the same jack is found on Inspiron 5150, 8500,
> 500m, 600m, and Latitude D500,
> D600, D800.
>
> Thanks,
> Al T
> Spokane, WA
>
> --
> -- All incoming and outgoing mail is checked with Norton AntiVirus 2005 --
>
>
August 21, 2006 1:02:44 AM

Quote:
You've discovered the third power supply connector for modern Dell
laptops. This third lead is used for communications between the power
supply and the laptop, so that the laptop can ensure it's got a valid,
legal, OEM Dell power supply, and what it's power capacity is.

I have no idea what the communications protocol between the two is,
but I know Dell laptops will reduce charging current (and extend
charge time) when operated with 65W instead of 90W power supplies,
will refuse to charge if operated from a non Dell supply, etc.

Let us know if you find out anything else!


I want to use my Inspiron 8200 on a boat. I have a 70W DC/DC converter but without the 3 pin connector. Has anybody learnt anything new since the posts above about how the 3rd pin is used and whether it is possible to make a non-Dell supply work?
August 31, 2006 2:46:19 PM

I have a simmilar problem with my D600 in that the power jack is toast. I however, do not want to attempt to de-solder and re-solder this jack - I am not a soldering export and would be afraid I would damage the board.

I do know, however, that the four large contacts on the bottom of the laptop are for charging the battery as well - this i show the docking station connects to the laptop. Does anyone know the "pinout" of these contacts? As in, which is positive, negative, ground, and signal? If I knew which was which I could rig up a little adaptor device myself.
December 23, 2006 9:19:59 PM

Has anybody found success? I also have this identical problem with my inspiron 8600. A power dock station sort of thing seems easy enough to build, but does anyone know how?

Thanks!
August 19, 2008 5:16:11 PM

I do have an open Dell D600 and see that the 4 contacts are grounded to a shield for the MB. You cannot use them to power the laptop.
May 28, 2009 9:48:08 AM

I am an electronic technician and after checking this power supply out I found that the barrel connector has 3 parts. The inside wall is positive (19volts) the outside is negative and the center pin is not even a volt but does send the signal to tell the laptop to start charging. I disconnected the center pin and the laptop will work while plugged into the wall but will not charge the battery. I normally use a radio shack N connector but since that only has positive and neg. it wont work for these.

If it were my personal laptop I would simply use an external 3 prong connector and let it hang out the back of the laptop and plug it in when I needed to charge it. But since this is a customers PC I will simply resolder the loose jack and return the PC to him. Problem is, this is the 2nd time Ive done it. Im sure it will come loose again. (he has kids and pets that knock the unit around)

There really is no other solution except to find a 3 prong connector that will mound flush to the back of the laptop and cut the cord and fabricate a new 3 prong connector. I am going to look into parts that may be feasable.

Hope this helps.

If you live in Maryland and need your laptops power jack repaired/replaced, please email me at timothybrockwell@yahoo.com

July 9, 2009 1:01:45 PM

i've tried to desolder my old power jack but seems to be really hard to get the 4 shield connectors to come off the motherboard - could anyone who has tried it please advise on how to do it - am using a solder gun with the temp set at 790 F and still having issues with this.

thanks

BB
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
July 16, 2009 12:01:41 AM

bmmach said:
i've tried to desolder my old power jack but seems to be really hard to get the 4 shield connectors to come off the motherboard - could anyone who has tried it please advise on how to do it - am using a solder gun with the temp set at 790 F and still having issues with this.

thanks

BB


Hey Dude, is your cutting tourch out of gas?? 790 is a bit high to be working on a multi-layer pc board. If you can find one, use something like a soldapult(sic), kind of a small hand held vacuum pump. If not get your wife's favorite table lamp, cut the power cord off (disconnection from wall highly reccomended first) strip out the copper wire and use it as a solder wick. You can also buy wick braid for the same purpose. Or just take it to a tv repair shop, and let them do it; cause if you mess up one of the internal traces on the board, your gonna have one b---h of a time trying to add a flywire(s) to the board without a schematic and pc board layout.

Yours Truly,
Dave from Slime Hole Mississippi
July 28, 2009 3:32:05 PM


Best to avoid all the hassles with Dell power supplies by avoiding Dell Vostro in the first place. My Dell is just over 12 months old and Dell can't even tell me what the power adapter pinout is! They say "it't not a Dell, it's made by someone else".

What?? This is the power supply stamped "Dell" that came with the Dell laptop. I went through 4 different department until the last one said "you are out of warranty, we'll have to charge you for this call".

Dell laptop reviews: Horrid. Don't buy well.

Did my own research and came up with the following (took apart the connector and got the laptop going but it won't charge).

The silly power supply has three pins. The outer and inner portions provide the 19V, the inner pin just let's the laptop know "time to charge". Why can't they do it like all other laptops?? You can't easily use a third party adapter.

I'm selling this pile of garbage and going back to Toshiba or something else that doesn't break just after 12 months. Dell is the K cars of computer companies and they will suffer the same fate as GM in a few years. Why buy American?? It's pure garbage.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
October 3, 2009 4:24:34 AM

I have been trying to adapt a stock 65W (2-Wire) Sony power adapter to replace a dead 65W (3-Wire) Dell adapter. All your posts were helpful and then I found a site which describes in detail the 3rd wire power adapter I.D. circuit. The following site is a must read before you will understand the rest of my post:

http://www.laptop-junction.com/toast/content/inside-del...

Using this information, I was able to identify the power adapter I.D. circuit in the dead power adapter. In my case it was three components on a 3/8" x 5/8" 'perf' board. (one 330 Ohm resistor, one diode looking device across the single line memory I/O port (probably surge suppression) and the single line memory device in a plastic transistor case, with only two wires connected to anything. I removed that circuit assembly from the dead adapter, and moved it from between the third wire and the minus power supply reference in the old adapter to the place in the d.c. cable where I spliced the Sony 2 wire cable into the 3-wire plug-tail from the old Dell cable, (on the adapter side of the ferrite RFI suppressor).

As has been told by others, without this adapter I.D. circuit, the two-wire adapter would power and run the laptop fine, but the error message indicated there was trouble with the adapter. After the I.D. circuit was added to the cable, the error message concerning the power adapter cleared and the battery charges.



December 30, 2009 5:47:50 PM

Quote:
I have been trying to adapt a stock 65W (2-Wire) Sony power adapter to replace a dead 65W (3-Wire) Dell adapter. All your posts were helpful and then I found a site which describes in detail the 3rd wire power adapter I.D. circuit. The following site is a must read before you will understand the rest of my post:

http://www.laptop-junction.com/toast/content/inside-del...

Using this information, I was able to identify the power adapter I.D. circuit in the dead power adapter. In my case it was three components on a 3/8" x 5/8" 'perf' board. (one 330 Ohm resistor, one diode looking device across the single line memory I/O port (probably surge suppression) and the single line memory device in a plastic transistor case, with only two wires connected to anything. I removed that circuit assembly from the dead adapter, and moved it from between the third wire and the minus power supply reference in the old adapter to the place in the d.c. cable where I spliced the Sony 2 wire cable into the 3-wire plug-tail from the old Dell cable, (on the adapter side of the ferrite RFI suppressor).

As has been told by others, without this adapter I.D. circuit, the two-wire adapter would power and run the laptop fine, but the error message indicated there was trouble with the adapter. After the I.D. circuit was added to the cable, the error message concerning the power adapter cleared and the battery charges.



Great reply. I had the same problem. My old Dell power supply went bad, and I knew it was simply a dead power supply (no output voltage). Since I just so happened to have an old adjustable 3-50V, 6A power supply laying around, I cut off the old Dell power cord, wired that into the new power supply, and promptly got the message that the power supply was not a recognized Dell adapter, even though I knew the power supply was exactly 19.5V. It worked, but wouldn't charge.

Since I didn't really care about the looks (I was using this at home temporarily until I got a new one) I took the old bad Dell power supply, trimmed back to the black and the green wire (black is the V-, green is the 1 wire data line) and tied those 2 wires into the cord that I had pulled off previously. The laptop now recognizes this as a "good" power supply, and charging now works fine.

January 31, 2010 10:44:33 AM

OK, I'm a newbie and I see this post/problem is a bit old, but here you go:

Any advice that I post here is NOT to be taken lightly. I am NOT a professional. I AM pitbull when it comes to "Getting it done" So use CAUTION with anything I post here! Use my advice at your own risk! I will not be held responsible for anything that may go wrong when using my suggestions!

Dell uses a logic circut in their chargers. If your charger is defective or you try to purchase a cheap aftermarket charger, it will not charge the battery. If you disable the adapter warnings in the system bios, it still will not charge the battery, it will just shut off the warning.

Every laptop battery I have ever seen has an EPROM chip inside to turn the battery off after a predetermined time. They do this to protect themselves against law suits, if the laptop bursts in flames or whatever, from an overheated , defective battery. I read on the web that some guy in Russia or somewhere, will sell you the plans to make an EPROM reader/reprogrammer, but honestly, who's got the time? And is it worth the risk of burning your house down? C series batteries are going for 50 bucks on Ebay, NOT 150.00

You can get the exact replacment DC jack on Ebay for like 6 bucks. [D series, C series whatever] Dell DC jacks are a pain to replace, because they have like 6 or 8 pins. You CAN do it, but it's rough. I use a liquid flux that comes in a magic marker looking pen, with a dabber on the end. This stuff makes ALL soldering and desoldering a LOT easier. [I use it on ALL soldering jobs] You will say to yourself "Why didn't I start using this stuff years ago?" You will think you just purchased a new soldering iron, it works that well. It's made by Kester and the PN is #186.

Dealing with the multiple pins: I do use a solder wick to get started. Flux the wick and get off as much solder as you can. Then I prop the mainboard on the bench so the jack overhangs the edge. I put a weight on the mainboard to hold it. I grab the jack from underneath with a pair of pliers. Flux the pins and move the iron around the pins and you will see the solder start to flow. Pull down on the jack [with the pliers of course] I try to work the outside edge first. Get the main two tabs flowing. [the heavier tabs] If you can get those to loosen, you can then insert a flat screwdriver beween the jack and the board. You can then keep pressure there and continue to heat. You should be able to pop the jack off. The PC board is resilient. It may even bend a little from the heat. But you have to be a little careful not to dislodge any small chips near where you are working.

Just a note: I exploded a brand new Weller soldering gun,doing these repairs. I held the switch on for so long trying to heat everything, it literally blew up right in my hand! Well not explode exactly, but a loud pop and sparks flew out and everything. USE CAUTION! If you can't get it at first, let everything cool off before continuing.

Another option is to cut the jack off with a pair of diagonal cutters. I ground a pair down the be thinner at the tip. You are not reusing the jack anyway. This way you can heat each pin seperately and pull them out. Then wick out the holes, install the new jack, apply some flux and resolder.

If you do a lot of this type of work, invest in an SMD soldering station. I picked mine up for like a hundred bucks. It uses hot air, just like they do at the factory. It allows you to heat ALL of the pins at once and the jack pops right off. And it's great for refloating video chips and whatnot. Just saying.

Hope this helps or at least keeps you thinking!
March 6, 2010 3:28:19 AM

i have latitude d600 but it can't turn ON and i have check the RAM and other removable components they are ok. using battery or AC i found out that the switch have a voltage of 5volt. Pls can anyone tell me why it is not powering up or what might be wrong?
March 6, 2010 7:32:09 AM

bobo_ 00 said:
i have latitude d600 but it can't turn ON and i have check the RAM and other removable components they are ok. using battery or AC i found out that the switch have a voltage of 5volt. Pls can anyone tell me why it is not powering up or what might be wrong?



The Dell D600 has a known motherboard issue. It has a chip somewhere on it, that comes loose over time. I've yet to discover the exact chip. I can however give you a "Test" to check it.

If you hold pressure on the bottom of the laptop near the docking port while powering on, it may boot up. Press there pretty firmly, but not so hard as to break the plastic or anything. It will probably boot up and work one or two times afterward without pressing it there. Then it will fail again.

I currently have 3 or 4 boards with this condition and I'm trying to figure out a permanent fix. I came up with a crazy idea. If it works I will post it here in a few weeks. If it works, I will have discovered an answer that so far, Dell can't figure out. They KNOW it's a common defect, but they refuse to admit it. This model is too old now for them to warranty it it anyway. Good luck - Jimbo
April 8, 2010 4:49:12 PM

I wish I had read Jimbotime17's post earlier because I did EXACTLY the same thing to get the DC jack off of a D600. Another thing that helps (I did not use his magic liquid flux) is to put new solder on each of the 9 posts. This helps the solder flow better when you use solder wick to remove it. A solder puller did nothing to help because the two rear pins that flank the signal center pin have a huge amount of solder on the component side of the board. I had to use solder wick on that side for those two pins as well. Put unit in a rubber vice and used the pliers to gentle work the whole assembly side to side to get it free. The use of the small flat blade screw driver is imperative to get the center two pins in the middle of the jack loose. It appears that DELL crimps the 4 outer shield case pins inward before they solder. This makes removing it a BXXXXH to get free. But if you go slowly and use a pin tip at 750 deg and work quickly, you can visit all the shield pins and start to move the whole jack to the inside of the board. The 3 pins at the opposite end where the mating plug goes in are the last to come free. Be very gentle with them.

I found that the center signal pin has no direct connection to the MB!!!!!! It has no plating in the via and the top and bottom surfaces have a stand-off radius from the pin. My guess is that they use rf transmit to other surfaces in the board to take that 1-wire bus to a chip somewhere on the MB. I used fine needles on a multimeter can could never find a connection to any of the chips or 2pin parts anywhere in the 2" neighboorhood of the DC jack. If someone has a schematic and/or a layout of the MB, it would be wonderful to post here where the center wire goes to. Hopefully I did not remove the center-signal trace, but examination under a good traveling microscope showed nothing in the via where it connects to the MB.

I bought the DC jack on eBay for $3.60 and should be here tomorrow. I am going to "double" my chances of getting the new jack to work. I am going to put three silicon wire leads that connect to the ground, +19.2DC, and the center signal pin in parallel with the jack when I install it. I will drill a small hole in the back plastic cover and route these to the outside. When I reassemble, I can monitor the signal line looking for the signal that "laptop-junction" so well described in his post. My only fear is that the center signal line may not get to the receiving chip to get the Power Supply ID information. I will let you know how it turns out.

Ted Cooper
April 9, 2010 11:48:26 PM

sfpcservice said:
Please see http://www.notebookpowerjacks.com They have a pinout of the 9-pin dell jack with an explanation of what each pin does. Hope this helps!


This site shows nothing of the sort. There is only a bunch of ads and popups. I strongly advise NOT using this site. Attempts at using their search engine only resulted in more pop-up ads, no content. I am not sure when this tip was posted, perhaps the site has changed since then, my experience was on 4/9/10. I am still looking for such a diagram in order to determine if our 1510 jack is broken, any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
April 10, 2010 12:27:17 AM

OK, I probably should have read to the end before posting. Sorry about that.
I have a Vostro 1510, it works great, we don't have any real problems with it, so I did not renew the extended warranty. Just about that time (of course ;D ) , the power adapter became so loose, that it has become almost impossible to charge because the power cord keeps falling out.

I realize that this is a known problem, from researching the issue on some other sites, that Dell handles by sending out new power supplies like they were candy, but the power supply isn't the problem. In looking more closely at the jack, it is apparent that the problem is a design flaw in the jack. It has several small metal pieces around the inside that used to stick out slightly and hold the power cord in place, over time they have become flat, and no longer hold the cord in.

I am assuming that means that I am going to need a new jack if I don't want to make myself crazy keeping track of how charged the battery is. I wanted to find a diagram of the pins in order to make sure that the jack and power supply are both in good condition, and that there aren't any broken pins in hopes that I could find a way to actually fix the problem, before going to the next step and figuring out how to replace it.

So far the only advice that I have seen on fixing this problem is to stick some tape onto the tip of the power cord, but that didn't work. I would be very greatful for any guidance that you may have.

Thanks, LGW
April 10, 2010 1:32:27 AM

LGW,
If your only problem is that the power supply is intermittent and that by applying pressure that you can get it to charge the battery and keep the notebook powered, then you only need to "beef up" the the "inside" ring of the power supply. Some people do this with very thin shim tapes (like.001 inch berylium foil). This is risky because it could come loose and short to ground. Another way is to put flux on the inside ring, then very lightly put a thin coat of solder to the inside ring (this is the one that applies +19.6 volts to the system). The center pin is only to bring in a signal on a "one wire bus" that tells the maker and amperage of the power supply during bootup. Hope this helps. Replacing the DC jack is a real pain if you are not skilled in soldering.
Ted Cooper
April 10, 2010 10:32:05 PM

The diode "like" device that others have mentioned in prior posts is actual a single wire serial data chip that is programmed to provide the validity and current capability of the supply to the motherboard. This is why you cannot get a docked laptop to run using the basic 65W supply rather than the 90W that comes with the dock or port replicator. Failure to provide valid data from the supply to the motherboard will prevent battery charging and the CPU will be idled back to minimal functionality. A few universal supply manufacturers such as APC and Targus actually provide connector "tips" that include the requisite device programmed with the correct data for proper operation but most do not and simply will not work correctly./
Bob Fay
April 18, 2010 12:23:16 AM

I have a question and an idea. first the question:
Doesn't this P|ss you off??? I am so angry at companies that spend more money in R&D figuring out ways to scroo the customer than they spend on researching the actual product! Can you imagine how much extra money went into the design of this "Feature"? I'll tell you, less money than they would make selling Power supplies to the dumb sheep that are us. You can bet that there is a spread sheet somewhere deep in the basement at Dell that details this whole scenario. And they even worked out the loss of sales due to bad press. I am deeply offended by companies who act in this manner.

My idea.... Has anyone heard of an altered bios? this is the obvious solution I would think. If the bios could be altered , it would solve the problem at the source.

UPDATE:
WOW, I was pissed earlier today when I realized my battery wasn't going to charge, But then I got POSTAL when I realized that my computer was also going to run at 7xxMHz unless I put a Dell PS on it!!! But I just found a temporary work around for the speed throttling issue. Use "Rightmark CPU Clock Utility" It will let you set the CPU multiplier to what ever. for those who don't know, CPU speed is determined by the Frontside BUS Speed (usually Fixed at a certain speed) times the Multiplier.

My Dell 1521 was running at 798 (200Mhz x 4)
After I installed RM CPU Clock Utility I am now running 1795Mhz (200Mhz x 9)

(yeah I know, 200 x 9 is 1800 , not 1795, Don't ask me were the 5 MHz goes, but thats what the diagnostics tell you)
April 20, 2010 5:55:41 PM

Got the new DC jack into the motherboard with no problems. Soldered silicon wires to the ground, +19.2DC, and to the center pin to monitor the signals. I tested the old DC jack compared to the new DC jack: result: absolutely nothing was broken or missing on the old DC jack.

So tearing off the old DC jack to fix the "battery not charging" problem was for nought. The new system performs exactly like the old system. The problem is that the center pin of the DC jack does not have a measurable connection to the motherboard that I can determine. If there is anyone out there who knows where the center pin goes to on the motherboard, please let me know (a picture of the chip it goes to would be GREAT).

But I did find a work around. I got a docking station and connected it to the computer. The docking station uses the same DC supply with a center pin. In this case, the unit works fine and charges the battery and runs the laptop with no problems. So if anyone knows where on the double row of pins for the docking station where the DC supply center pin goes, that would also solve my problem because I could run a wire from my replaced DC jack to that docking station pin and then the CPU would know that a "valid" DC supply is connected.

I have found on the Web a .pdf file that claims to be a schematic diagram for the D610 computer. I have searched that diagram for where the Vin connects and looked for anything like the center pin. Cannot find a signal that represents that function. If somebody knows what Dell calls the center pin signal, that would be a definite advance.

SO IF YOU CANNOT CHARGE YOUR BATTERY: try using a docking station (a common type fits all D600-630 systems) and be sure your power supply is at least 90 watts. If that makes your system work, you definitely know your center pin has been disconnected.
April 20, 2010 10:55:27 PM

On the D600, the 3rd pin goes thru L77, which is mounted close to the power jack. I have not looked where it is on the D610. L77 is located on the underside of the board, to the left of PV3. You can hardly see the lettering, there is a tin glob right where the 77 is etched, you can see the L properly.

I think if somebody can get the clock back up, I could figure out how to give the permissives to the Maxim battery charger chip. I would need to remove a couple of transistors, and bypass them. Those are to give the current reference to the charger. the D600 can take either a 65W, 90W, or a 130W power supply, but this info comes form the power supply itself. I can remove these selections, and make it so that it is fixed to 65W, it would take longer to charge the battery, but it would accept any power supply after this. The next step is to enable the charger when the AC is plugged in, I can do that, but my missing link was to get back the processor speed. 600MHz was not my type of processing power.

If anybody is interested, let me know, I can go in more details. Now, I said I think I can do it, but I have not tested it yet!

Where can I get that utility to crank up the speed?

And one last thing, tjcooper, how can I find the schematic diagram for the D610?

Thanks
April 20, 2010 11:52:03 PM

Jimbotime17 said:
The Dell D600 has a known motherboard issue. It has a chip somewhere on it, that comes loose over time. I've yet to discover the exact chip. I can however give you a "Test" to check it.

If you hold pressure on the bottom of the laptop near the docking port while powering on, it may boot up. Press there pretty firmly, but not so hard as to break the plastic or anything. It will probably boot up and work one or two times afterward without pressing it there. Then it will fail again.

I currently have 3 or 4 boards with this condition and I'm trying to figure out a permanent fix. I came up with a crazy idea. If it works I will post it here in a few weeks. If it works, I will have discovered an answer that so far, Dell can't figure out. They KNOW it's a common defect, but they refuse to admit it. This model is too old now for them to warranty it it anyway. Good luck - Jimbo


I have seen a solder failure on the input choke, FL1, that gave me problems. With a half decent soldering iron just resolder the choke. It is locaded on the backside of the mobo, right below the power jack. I think the flexing of the board when the computer is handled with the power cord in, cracks the solder joint.

Good Luck!
April 21, 2010 12:09:11 AM

andrepel said:
....... "I think if somebody can get the clock back up, I could figure out how to give the permissives to the Maxim battery charger chip.".........

........"If anybody is interested, let me know, I can go in more details. Now, I said I think I can do it, but I have not tested it yet!"

"Where can I get that utility to crank up the speed?".........


Yes. I am definitely interested.

I have a inspiron 1521 with this problem. I am using RightMark CPU Clock Utility and it is better than windows or Dell's power management. With RM CPU Clock , I can totally customize when and how the CPU throttles back. Or I can just leave it full throttle.

get it here http://cpu.rightmark.org/download/rmclock_235_bin.rar

That is really a great free program.

I have an extra (blown) 1521 motherboard, can I help in some way? I would love to come up with an easy way to screw Dell. Or at least, prevent Dell from screwing another customer. I am really angry at them. I have always hated companies that do this stuff, but Dell has suddenly taken 1st prize in my book. #1 company out to Scroo U.
April 26, 2010 2:02:24 AM

tjcooper said:
LGW,
If your only problem is that the power supply is intermittent and that by applying pressure that you can get it to charge the battery and keep the notebook powered, then you only need to "beef up" the the "inside" ring of the power supply. Some people do this with very thin shim tapes (like.001 inch berylium foil). This is risky because it could come loose and short to ground. Another way is to put flux on the inside ring, then very lightly put a thin coat of solder to the inside ring (this is the one that applies +19.6 volts to the system). The center pin is only to bring in a signal on a "one wire bus" that tells the maker and amperage of the power supply during bootup. Hope this helps. Replacing the DC jack is a real pain if you are not skilled in soldering.
Ted Cooper

Hey Ted,

Thank you so much for your reply, that is exactly what the problem is. My problem is that I have NO skill, or experience with soldering, and I don't think that this is going to be a good place to start. However, I may be able to find a local hardware tech who can do the job for me, (this is the bay area after all, ;)  ). So far everyone wants over $150 to even look at the problem, which is rediculous. I can see what the problem is, I just don't have the skill... yet :kaola:  .

I agree with the person who wrote how angry they were about this situation. I generally hate proprietary garbage like this, but if they at least designed it so that it didn't break, I would be less irked by Dell's apparent need to have only their power supplies connected to their laptops. I just get so angry with poor, shoddy, design and workmanship.

Thanks again, this sounds like it will work, I will write back and confirm. Best wishes to all of you still looking for answers.

TTFN

LGW
April 26, 2010 4:42:30 PM

Ladygreenwitch,
If you always will use the same charger on this "hurting" unit, you could put the thin solder coat on the external chrome metal sleeve of your power supply. This is much easier to do that to put the solder on the internal metal sleeve of the laptop connector.
A lab tech can do this in about 3 minutes time and you should be able to test if the system is more reliable at this point. If you get too much solder, then a thin metal file can remove the excess with just a few strokes.

DO NOT use the Las Vegas repair facility called Laptop Repair (I think that is the correct name). They ripped me off on eBay for a DC jack repair and said all my other boards were failing and I needed a new graphics display card etc. The $150 repair ended costing me $450 (more than the cost of an eBay replacement unit) and when my technicians looked at their work later, the HAD NOT EVEN REPLACED ANY BOARDS or the DC JACK. Sadly I found this out later than eBay permits feedback. If I had the time, I would start legal proceedings against them because it was all fraud, plain and simple. So do be careful who you have do the work. Ask for references and check with the BBB.
Ted
April 26, 2010 4:52:52 PM

General update:
Several of you have PMed me and asked where I found the .pdf of the Dell schematic. By accident I found the page again and will pass it on to you. This site has many different types of Dell laptops for which they have schematics. Please note that these are
most likely "Chinese copy" schematics since English is not the native language of whomever drew them. They do not have the
chip layouts so you won't know which chip is where. If anyone finds a diagram for D600 with component layouts, please pass it along here. The entire Dell community could use this help.

http://www.laptopschematic.com/dell/page/4/

Ted
April 29, 2010 2:08:55 AM

tjcooper said:
Ladygreenwitch,
If you always will use the same charger on this "hurting" unit, you could put the thin solder coat on the external chrome metal sleeve of your power supply. This is much easier to do that to put the solder on the internal metal sleeve of the laptop connector.
A lab tech can do this in about 3 minutes time and you should be able to test if the system is more reliable at this point. If you get too much solder, then a thin metal file can remove the excess with just a few strokes.

DO NOT use the Las Vegas repair facility called Laptop Repair (I think that is the correct name). They ripped me off on eBay for a DC jack repair and said all my other boards were failing and I needed a new graphics display card etc. The $150 repair ended costing me $450 (more than the cost of an eBay replacement unit) and when my technicians looked at their work later, the HAD NOT EVEN REPLACED ANY BOARDS or the DC JACK. Sadly I found this out later than eBay permits feedback. If I had the time, I would start legal proceedings against them because it was all fraud, plain and simple. So do be careful who you have do the work. Ask for references and check with the BBB.
Ted


Thanks Ted,

That is exactly what I was thinking. It also resolves the original design flaw by putting the "locking mechanism" on the easiest part to access. Don't worry, I know enough to stay away from those types. We have enough local kid wizards around here that do most of their own builds, and I would feel confident in any of them doing a tiny bit of soldering for me. Take care.

LGW
April 29, 2010 2:37:42 AM

tjcooper said:
General update:
Several of you have PMed me and asked where I found the .pdf of the Dell schematic. By accident I found the page again and will pass it on to you. This site has many different types of Dell laptops for which they have schematics. Please note that these are
most likely "Chinese copy" schematics since English is not the native language of whomever drew them. They do not have the
chip layouts so you won't know which chip is where. If anyone finds a diagram for D600 with component layouts, please pass it along here. The entire Dell community could use this help.

http://www.laptopschematic.com/dell/page/4/

Ted



http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/9519-2-dell-laptop-po...

Try this link, I found it by accident. Very very helpful.


Andre
June 30, 2010 10:05:03 PM

Jimbotime17 said:
The Dell D600 has a known motherboard issue. It has a chip somewhere on it, that comes loose over time. I've yet to discover the exact chip. I can however give you a "Test" to check it.

If you hold pressure on the bottom of the laptop near the docking port while powering on, it may boot up. Press there pretty firmly, but not so hard as to break the plastic or anything. It will probably boot up and work one or two times afterward without pressing it there. Then it will fail again.

I currently have 3 or 4 boards with this condition and I'm trying to figure out a permanent fix. I came up with a crazy idea. If it works I will post it here in a few weeks. If it works, I will have discovered an answer that so far, Dell can't figure out. They KNOW it's a common defect, but they refuse to admit it. This model is too old now for them to warranty it it anyway. Good luck - Jimbo


Jimbotime 17,
I also aquired a D600 with the same problem. I accidently pressed down on the center of the keyboard and the other LEDs lit up, and stayed on for hours, and the laptop works fine.
Now when the leds don't come on I just press firmly on the "Y" key and they light up and stay on till next startup. Maybe a small crack in the motherboard? Tray
July 27, 2010 11:24:04 AM

This is not very elegant, but is none the less exactly what I did to get that stupid power jack off my motherboard. I took my dremel tool and cut the back off the bad jack, keeping very light pressure to not bend the motherboard or stress it in any way. I basically worked with tiny snips and dremel till I got it down to just pins and then it was easy to unsolder each pin. Yeah, that is why they call me crazy, but it worked. My husband calls me 'the bull' and covers his eyes when I do things like disassemble my laptop. :kaola: 

I am going to reread this thread because since I replaced the jack, my pooter claims I need a 130V to run it. I have an Inspiron E1705 which runs on 90V. It will charge on the 90V once I get it passed the initial boot, so it is merely more precocious than before. I am undecided as to whether to just get a 130V or try a work around.

crazy shirley
a b D Laptop
August 10, 2010 2:03:51 AM

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