How do I get rid of Norton?

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

I've got a couple of Dell machines which came with Norton, and am
trying to remove it to install McAfee. Even though I've removed all
3-4 of the norton apps (security center, virus scanner, livereg,
liveupdate), and removed their entries with startup.cpl, I still have
ccevtmgr and ccsetmgr showing up in my processes.

Is there an app to tear out all the Norton dreck? This is more
insidious than a lot of malware! Grrrr....

Thanks!
30 answers Last reply
More about norton
  1. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    "William P. N. Smith" wrote:
    >
    > I've got a couple of Dell machines which came with Norton, and am
    > trying to remove it to install McAfee. Even though I've removed all
    > 3-4 of the norton apps (security center, virus scanner, livereg,
    > liveupdate), and removed their entries with startup.cpl, I still have
    > ccevtmgr and ccsetmgr showing up in my processes.
    >
    > Is there an app to tear out all the Norton dreck? This is more
    > insidious than a lot of malware! Grrrr....

    Have a look at http://service1.symantec.com/SUPPORT/nav.nsf/docid/2001092114452606.

    Notan
  2. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    Notan <notan@ddress.com> wrote:
    >Have a look at http://service1.symantec.com/SUPPORT/nav.nsf/docid/2001092114452606.

    Thanks, Notan! Looks like SymNRT is going to be just the ticket!
  3. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    Norton Anti-Virus and friends do embed themselves very well into the bowels of
    Windows, and the uninstall of most any Symantec program is an imperfect task.
    Are ccevtmgr and ccsetmgr running processes, or do they show up in Task Manager
    as stopped? Processes get defined and started up via registry entries, so you
    may have to use regedit to clean all the gunk out. Also, look in the Program
    Files folders for any Norton Anti-Virus entries and delete manually.

    Last week, I had to work on one of my client's computers and ended up clearing
    out all the Norton junk from the registry with regedit.

    Today, when I uninstalled a copy of McAfee from a client's computer because a
    Trojan or worm had mangled it up, the uninstall left only one innocuous entry
    behind in the registry... Ben Myers

    On Mon, 26 Sep 2005 20:08:03 -0400, William P. N. Smith <> wrote:

    >I've got a couple of Dell machines which came with Norton, and am
    >trying to remove it to install McAfee. Even though I've removed all
    >3-4 of the norton apps (security center, virus scanner, livereg,
    >liveupdate), and removed their entries with startup.cpl, I still have
    >ccevtmgr and ccsetmgr showing up in my processes.
    >
    >Is there an app to tear out all the Norton dreck? This is more
    >insidious than a lot of malware! Grrrr....
    >
    >Thanks!
  4. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    <William P. N. Smith> wrote in message
    news:v23hj19uiejddn9gn38mlc9abq4vfmehii@4ax.com...
    > I've got a couple of Dell machines which came with Norton, and am
    > trying to remove it to install McAfee. Even though I've removed all
    > 3-4 of the norton apps (security center, virus scanner, livereg,
    > liveupdate), and removed their entries with startup.cpl, I still have
    > ccevtmgr and ccsetmgr showing up in my processes.
    >
    > Is there an app to tear out all the Norton dreck? This is more
    > insidious than a lot of malware! Grrrr....
    >
    > Thanks!

    Did you download their uninstaller from the Symantec website?

    Good luck with whatever alternative you choose. Whatever product you
    choose, it will be a step backward from the protection provided by Norton
    Internet Security.

    Bobby
  5. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    I would disagree with the assertion that Norton products are superior to any
    other on the market today. A quick review of the various publications and
    their associated websites will show that products like Zone Alarm, AVG
    Anti-Virus, Spybot Search and Destroy and Ad-Aware are as good as, if not
    better than anything Symantec currently produces. Not to mention having the
    virtue of being free of charge for most of the applications.

    It is common knowledge that Norton products are resource hogs of the first
    water and are, in many installations, causing more problems than they fix.
    I would never suggest their use.

    "NoNoBadDog!" <no_@spam_verizon.net> wrote in message
    news:ZB0_e.13103$y64.7415@trnddc06...
    >
    > <William P. N. Smith> wrote in message
    > news:v23hj19uiejddn9gn38mlc9abq4vfmehii@4ax.com...
    >> I've got a couple of Dell machines which came with Norton, and am
    >> trying to remove it to install McAfee. Even though I've removed all
    >> 3-4 of the norton apps (security center, virus scanner, livereg,
    >> liveupdate), and removed their entries with startup.cpl, I still have
    >> ccevtmgr and ccsetmgr showing up in my processes.
    >>
    >> Is there an app to tear out all the Norton dreck? This is more
    >> insidious than a lot of malware! Grrrr....
    >>
    >> Thanks!
    >
    > Did you download their uninstaller from the Symantec website?
    >
    > Good luck with whatever alternative you choose. Whatever product you
    > choose, it will be a step backward from the protection provided by Norton
    > Internet Security.
    >
    > Bobby
    >
    >
  6. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    On Mon, 26 Sep 2005 20:08:03 -0400, wrote:

    > I've got a couple of Dell machines which came with Norton, and am
    > trying to remove it to install McAfee. Even though I've removed all
    > 3-4 of the norton apps (security center, virus scanner, livereg,
    > liveupdate), and removed their entries with startup.cpl, I still have
    > ccevtmgr and ccsetmgr showing up in my processes.
    >
    > Is there an app to tear out all the Norton dreck? This is more
    > insidious than a lot of malware! Grrrr....
    >
    > Thanks!

    I don't know why you'd prefer McAfee. Mine came preloaded with McAfee and
    it wouldn't allow legitimate programs (such as nmap) run without
    configuring McAfee to allow it to run. I removed McAfee and installed
    Norton. As a matter of fact, I had to edit the registry to completely
    remove McAfee. I had to edit the registry for other "removed" programs
    also. So, it's not just a Norton issue. You'll probably have to remove all
    registry entries for Norton - if you know what you're doing - but I highly
    recommend that you back it up first!
  7. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    <William P. N. Smith> wrote in message
    news:v23hj19uiejddn9gn38mlc9abq4vfmehii@4ax.com...
    > I've got a couple of Dell machines which came with Norton, and am
    > trying to remove it to install McAfee. Even though I've removed all
    > 3-4 of the norton apps (security center, virus scanner, livereg,
    > liveupdate), and removed their entries with startup.cpl, I still have
    > ccevtmgr and ccsetmgr showing up in my processes.
    >
    > Is there an app to tear out all the Norton dreck? This is more
    > insidious than a lot of malware! Grrrr....
    >
    > Thanks!

    Here is what you do:

    You yell "Get out of here Norton" real loud, wave your arms, pound your fist,
    and say "to the moon." He pulls down his hat, turns quickly with a scared
    look, and runs upstairs!

    for those of a certain age.

    Or you could do what I did to remove Norton 2002:

    I first used the uninstall program that was in the Norton directory and then,
    after rebooting, had to go back and use XP's add/remove programs to get rid of
    the remains. That seemed to work.

    Bill
  8. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    And I would argue equally strongly your assertion that Norton products are
    Resource hogs.
    They are not. On a healthy system, they have no impact on system
    performance. A quick review of the Processes tab under Task Manager will
    prove to anyone with Norton install that it does not take up any more
    resources than any other application (of any kind).

    Bobby

    "Kevin" <webman6@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:YV1_e.101$hp6.14022@news.uswest.net...
    >I would disagree with the assertion that Norton products are superior to
    >any other on the market today. A quick review of the various publications
    >and their associated websites will show that products like Zone Alarm, AVG
    >Anti-Virus, Spybot Search and Destroy and Ad-Aware are as good as, if not
    >better than anything Symantec currently produces. Not to mention having
    >the virtue of being free of charge for most of the applications.
    >
    > It is common knowledge that Norton products are resource hogs of the first
    > water and are, in many installations, causing more problems than they fix.
    > I would never suggest their use.
    >
    > "NoNoBadDog!" <no_@spam_verizon.net> wrote in message
    > news:ZB0_e.13103$y64.7415@trnddc06...
    >>
    >> <William P. N. Smith> wrote in message
    >> news:v23hj19uiejddn9gn38mlc9abq4vfmehii@4ax.com...
    >>> I've got a couple of Dell machines which came with Norton, and am
    >>> trying to remove it to install McAfee. Even though I've removed all
    >>> 3-4 of the norton apps (security center, virus scanner, livereg,
    >>> liveupdate), and removed their entries with startup.cpl, I still have
    >>> ccevtmgr and ccsetmgr showing up in my processes.
    >>>
    >>> Is there an app to tear out all the Norton dreck? This is more
    >>> insidious than a lot of malware! Grrrr....
    >>>
    >>> Thanks!
    >>
    >> Did you download their uninstaller from the Symantec website?
    >>
    >> Good luck with whatever alternative you choose. Whatever product you
    >> choose, it will be a step backward from the protection provided by Norton
    >> Internet Security.
    >>
    >> Bobby
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
  9. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    "NoNoBadDog!" wrote:
    >
    > And I would argue equally strongly your assertion that Norton products are
    > Resource hogs.
    > They are not. On a healthy system, they have no impact on system
    > performance. A quick review of the Processes tab under Task Manager will
    > prove to anyone with Norton install that it does not take up any more
    > resources than any other application (of any kind).
    >
    > <snip>

    I remember this discussion from another thread and, if I remember correctly,
    you were the only poster that didn't believe Norton products to be resource
    hogs.

    Either you're right, or *everyone* else is wrong! <g>

    Notan
  10. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    "Either you're right, or *everyone* else is wrong! <g>"

    "If loving you is wrong, I don't wanna be right."
    - Luther Ingram

    Die, useless thread, die!

    Ted Zieglar

    "Notan" <notan@ddress.com> wrote in message news:4338C1DE.F1EDA38D@ddress.com...
    > "NoNoBadDog!" wrote:
    >>
    >> And I would argue equally strongly your assertion that Norton products are
    >> Resource hogs.
    >> They are not. On a healthy system, they have no impact on system
    >> performance. A quick review of the Processes tab under Task Manager will
    >> prove to anyone with Norton install that it does not take up any more
    >> resources than any other application (of any kind).
    >>
    >> <snip>
    >
    > I remember this discussion from another thread and, if I remember correctly,
    > you were the only poster that didn't believe Norton products to be resource
    > hogs.
    >
    > Either you're right, or *everyone* else is wrong! <g>
    >
    > Notan
  11. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    Ted Zieglar wrote:
    >
    > "Either you're right, or *everyone* else is wrong! <g>"
    >
    > <snip>

    Wait a second... That didn't make *any* sense! (Kinda like,
    "Heads I win, tails you lose!)

    It should've been, "If you're right, then *everyone* else
    is wrong!

    On *that* note, goodnight! <g>

    Notan
  12. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    "Notan" <notan@ddress.com> wrote in message
    news:4338C1DE.F1EDA38D@ddress.com...
    > "NoNoBadDog!" wrote:
    >>
    >> And I would argue equally strongly your assertion that Norton products
    >> are
    >> Resource hogs.
    >> They are not. On a healthy system, they have no impact on system
    >> performance. A quick review of the Processes tab under Task Manager will
    >> prove to anyone with Norton install that it does not take up any more
    >> resources than any other application (of any kind).
    >>
    >> <snip>
    >
    > I remember this discussion from another thread and, if I remember
    > correctly,
    > you were the only poster that didn't believe Norton products to be
    > resource
    > hogs.
    >
    > Either you're right, or *everyone* else is wrong! <g>
    >
    > Notan

    Can you, or any of the other posters, provide *any* proof that they are
    reserving resources?
    Can you provide a single example of how any Norton product is taking any
    resources away from the system? Can you provide any evidence of loss of
    memory space or any other consequence of Norton?

    Have you ever read a magazine article that demonstrated any support of the
    "resource hog" allegation?

    Have you ever found a website that can prove that resources are lost when a
    Norton product is installed?


    Bobby
  13. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    On Tue, 27 Sep 2005 04:26:39 GMT, "NoNoBadDog!" <no_@spam_verizon.net>
    wrote:

    >
    >"Notan" <notan@ddress.com> wrote in message
    >news:4338C1DE.F1EDA38D@ddress.com...
    >> "NoNoBadDog!" wrote:
    >>>
    >>> And I would argue equally strongly your assertion that Norton products
    >>> are
    >>> Resource hogs.
    >>> They are not. On a healthy system, they have no impact on system
    >>> performance. A quick review of the Processes tab under Task Manager will
    >>> prove to anyone with Norton install that it does not take up any more
    >>> resources than any other application (of any kind).
    >>>
    >>> <snip>
    >>
    >> I remember this discussion from another thread and, if I remember
    >> correctly,
    >> you were the only poster that didn't believe Norton products to be
    >> resource
    >> hogs.
    >>
    >> Either you're right, or *everyone* else is wrong! <g>
    >>
    >> Notan
    >
    >Can you, or any of the other posters, provide *any* proof that they are
    >reserving resources?
    >Can you provide a single example of how any Norton product is taking any
    >resources away from the system? Can you provide any evidence of loss of
    >memory space or any other consequence of Norton?
    >
    >Have you ever read a magazine article that demonstrated any support of the
    >"resource hog" allegation?
    >
    >Have you ever found a website that can prove that resources are lost when a
    >Norton product is installed?
    >
    >
    >Bobby
    >

    Cnet.com for starters but there are others (google websites for
    "Norton resource hog").

    Personally I had Norton stuff on my machine and after a year or so
    (admittedly I installed more software than Dell had given me), it
    started to cause crashes every few months. I put up with it and most
    of the time I was able to fix the crashes with little fuss but the
    last crash it was difficult to fix and that's when I decided no more
    Norton stuff. I don't know explicitly how I got rid of all Norton
    files but my system is clean of Norton and it hasn't crashed since.

    I got suspicious about Norton stuff when I read many threads (not just
    one) that claimed Norton was hogging their resources. I will post
    another post to the OP how I think he can get rid of Norton files tho
    I don't recall if I did this now to rid my system of them (I think it
    took me a while of trying different combination of things to make it
    clean).
  14. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    On Mon, 26 Sep 2005 20:08:03 -0400, William P. N. Smith <> wrote:

    >I've got a couple of Dell machines which came with Norton, and am
    >trying to remove it to install McAfee. Even though I've removed all
    >3-4 of the norton apps (security center, virus scanner, livereg,
    >liveupdate), and removed their entries with startup.cpl, I still have
    >ccevtmgr and ccsetmgr showing up in my processes.
    >
    >Is there an app to tear out all the Norton dreck? This is more
    >insidious than a lot of malware! Grrrr....
    >
    >Thanks!


    I agree with you that Norton isn't worth keeping (at least that was my
    experience then and now).

    I don't recall how I got rid of all its files (I think I took a while
    of trying to get rid of it before successfully doing it) but this is
    what I'd do for starters... go to Administrative tools and then to
    component services and if it's listed in there, disable it. Then go
    to the Norton website and see if they tell you how to get rid of them.
    If not, then install another virus program and tell it to scan your
    system. It might find the Norton files and rid your pc of them (not
    sure on this but its worth trying). You could also try Webroot
    spysweeper to scan your system and see if it finds them (again not
    sure on this). Of course you could go into your registry and
    eliminate them manually if you're brave (don't do this unless you
    think you can and regardless, backup your registry or whole system
    first just in case).
  15. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    NoNoBadDog! wrote:

    > And I would argue equally strongly your assertion that Norton products are
    > Resource hogs.
    > They are not. On a healthy system, they have no impact on system
    > performance. A quick review of the Processes tab under Task Manager will
    > prove to anyone with Norton install that it does not take up any more
    > resources than any other application (of any kind).
    >
    > Bobby
    >
    Well since Norton isn't exactlly free but the alternatives previously
    mentioned are, why don't you install them and post your results (I'll
    set up a web server to host your screen shots if you fon't have web space).

    My guess is that maybe AVG, ZoneAlarm, SpyBot & Ad-Aware all running
    simultaneously may be close to Norton running a scan, but in normal use
    (just the AVG & ZoneAlarm running residently) will be significantly less
    than all of Norton's resident processes. Feel free to prove me wrong
    (I'd check myself but I don't exactly feel like paying for Norton).
  16. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    <William P. N. Smith> wrote in message
    news:v23hj19uiejddn9gn38mlc9abq4vfmehii@4ax.com...
    > I've got a couple of Dell machines which came with Norton, and am
    > trying to remove it to install McAfee. Even though I've removed all
    > 3-4 of the norton apps (security center, virus scanner, livereg,
    > liveupdate), and removed their entries with startup.cpl, I still have
    > ccevtmgr and ccsetmgr showing up in my processes.
    >
    > Is there an app to tear out all the Norton dreck? This is more
    > insidious than a lot of malware! Grrrr....
    >
    > Thanks!


    Sadly, add/remove programs, manually remove remaining folders, and
    regedit......

    These products should be a *help* to the end user and an advocate of "less
    is more" in their applications. Just the opposite is true, imo.

    Norton and McAfee are drinking deeply from the well of 'bigger and
    convoluted is better'.

    The software equivalent of most vendor "All In One" pscf machines...


    Stew
  17. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    Norton has some special cleaners on their support website. But even
    after using them on 2 pc's to completely get rid of NAV and NIS I
    still had to manually clean out some registry entries. I now use ESET
    NOD32 and ZoneAlarm Pro on both pc's - this combo runs significantly
    faster (and with fewer problems) than NAV+NIS.

    <William P. N. Smith> wrote in message
    news:v23hj19uiejddn9gn38mlc9abq4vfmehii@4ax.com...
    > I've got a couple of Dell machines which came with Norton, and am
    > trying to remove it to install McAfee. Even though I've removed all
    > 3-4 of the norton apps (security center, virus scanner, livereg,
    > liveupdate), and removed their entries with startup.cpl, I still
    > have
    > ccevtmgr and ccsetmgr showing up in my processes.
    >
    > Is there an app to tear out all the Norton dreck? This is more
    > insidious than a lot of malware! Grrrr....
  18. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    Spybot and Ad-Aware (at least the free version) do not launch any processes or
    background programs. Generally, I advise people to run them when they see
    strange symptoms on their computers. As a result, they do not use system
    memory on an on-going basis, but they also do not intervene in real-time to
    thwart the Trojans, adbots or whatever.

    Although I have no empirical measurements to back up an assertion, I would claim
    that the combo of AVG and ZoneAlarm (EXCELLENT software! The best firewall!)
    would hog less memory than the Norton security package.

    Because people are still quarreling about the definitions of spyware, adbots,
    trojans and other malware, the effectiveness of different packages varies in the
    ability to detect and remove the junk. No matter what, running two or more
    software packages seems to have better results than relying on one.

    After my recent escapades in removing Norton Anti-Virus, I can assure everyone
    that it really gets its little hooks onto the soft underbelly of Windows, namely
    the registry and the SYSTEM32 folder. It does not uninstall easily... Ben Myers

    On Tue, 27 Sep 2005 06:49:00 GMT, Nicholas Andrade <SDNick484@nospam.yahoo.com>
    wrote:

    >NoNoBadDog! wrote:
    >
    >> And I would argue equally strongly your assertion that Norton products are
    >> Resource hogs.
    >> They are not. On a healthy system, they have no impact on system
    >> performance. A quick review of the Processes tab under Task Manager will
    >> prove to anyone with Norton install that it does not take up any more
    >> resources than any other application (of any kind).
    >>
    >> Bobby
    >>
    >Well since Norton isn't exactlly free but the alternatives previously
    >mentioned are, why don't you install them and post your results (I'll
    >set up a web server to host your screen shots if you fon't have web space).
    >
    >My guess is that maybe AVG, ZoneAlarm, SpyBot & Ad-Aware all running
    >simultaneously may be close to Norton running a scan, but in normal use
    >(just the AVG & ZoneAlarm running residently) will be significantly less
    >than all of Norton's resident processes. Feel free to prove me wrong
    >(I'd check myself but I don't exactly feel like paying for Norton).
  19. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    <William P. N. Smith> wrote in message
    news:v23hj19uiejddn9gn38mlc9abq4vfmehii@4ax.com...
    > I've got a couple of Dell machines which came with Norton, and am
    > trying to remove it to install McAfee. Even though I've removed all
    > 3-4 of the norton apps (security center, virus scanner, livereg,
    > liveupdate), and removed their entries with startup.cpl, I still have
    > ccevtmgr and ccsetmgr showing up in my processes.
    >
    > Is there an app to tear out all the Norton dreck? This is more
    > insidious than a lot of malware! Grrrr....
    >
    > Thanks!

    That is the MAIN REASON that I refuse to buy Symantec products
    any more...it is worse than most of the viruses that it purports to protect
    you against! Most of the reason for its behavior is Symantec paranoia
    over theft of their product...theft? Actually, I'd like software that would
    protect me from ever installing the stuff.

    Good luck.
  20. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    On Tue, 27 Sep 2005 06:36:54 -0500, Rob wrote:

    >On Mon, 26 Sep 2005 20:08:03 -0400, William P. N. Smith <> wrote:
    >
    >>I've got a couple of Dell machines which came with Norton, and am
    >>trying to remove it to install McAfee. Even though I've removed all
    >>3-4 of the norton apps (security center, virus scanner, livereg,
    >>liveupdate), and removed their entries with startup.cpl, I still have
    >>ccevtmgr and ccsetmgr showing up in my processes.
    >>
    >>Is there an app to tear out all the Norton dreck? This is more
    >>insidious than a lot of malware! Grrrr....
    >>
    >>Thanks!
    >
    >
    >I agree with you that Norton isn't worth keeping (at least that was my
    >experience then and now).
    >
    >I don't recall how I got rid of all its files (I think I took a while
    >of trying to get rid of it before successfully doing it) but this is
    >what I'd do for starters... go to Administrative tools and then to
    >component services and if it's listed in there, disable it. Then go
    >to the Norton website and see if they tell you how to get rid of them.
    >If not, then install another virus program and tell it to scan your
    >system. It might find the Norton files and rid your pc of them (not
    >sure on this but its worth trying). You could also try Webroot
    >spysweeper to scan your system and see if it finds them (again not
    >sure on this). Of course you could go into your registry and
    >eliminate them manually if you're brave (don't do this unless you
    >think you can and regardless, backup your registry or whole system
    >first just in case).


    Just to add to my post, if it matters and it may not... I use
    Kaspersky AntiVirus Personal (a pain to set up but set it and forget
    it as it's very stable and reliable even as a scheduled event which is
    what I have done) along with webroot spysweeper and zonealarm pro. I
    believe my system is clean of viri and perhaps once or twice a year
    when I'm downloading email that has a virus in it (unbeknownst to me
    at that moment), it (Kaspersky) will kill that email (per my
    instruction in the setup) and allow the remainder of email to download
    as if nothing happened automatically. Kaspersky was one of the best a
    year or so ago but now not sure. Certainly others are easier to set
    up. And with these programs, I don't get the crashes I got before.
    Last, I remember when I first ran these programs, it seemed like they
    caught stuff Nortons did not catch at that time.

    Bottom line is, my system seems to be happy and so am I.
  21. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    Environment is a factor, production or desktop, high demand operations
    or low, and even then the user level effects the perception of what is a
    significant speed hit and what is not.

    In some environments it is even a good idea to have virus servers that
    act as filters for all data into and out of a particular network segment.
    Mail servers in particular usually have a series of server layers to filter
    out spam and then viruses, before the actual mail servers.
  22. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    NoNoBadDog! <no_@spam_verizon.net> wrote:
    > "Notan" <notan@ddress.com> wrote in message
    > news:4338C1DE.F1EDA38D@ddress.com...
    >> "NoNoBadDog!" wrote:
    >>>
    >>> And I would argue equally strongly your assertion that Norton products
    >>> are
    >>> Resource hogs.
    >>> They are not. On a healthy system, they have no impact on system
    >>> performance. A quick review of the Processes tab under Task Manager will
    >>> prove to anyone with Norton install that it does not take up any more
    >>> resources than any other application (of any kind).
    >>>
    >>> <snip>
    >>
    >> I remember this discussion from another thread and, if I remember
    >> correctly,
    >> you were the only poster that didn't believe Norton products to be
    >> resource
    >> hogs.
    >>
    >> Either you're right, or *everyone* else is wrong! <g>
    >>
    >> Notan

    > Can you, or any of the other posters, provide *any* proof that they are
    > reserving resources?

    Proof? That's a bit silly.

    CNET ran sysmark and other benchmarks with NAV on/off. They report
    a 4% performance hit. You can google the article yourself.

    But again, that's CNET running in some unspecified mode. I doubt
    any of the benchmarks do things like rapid file open/file close
    that would be seen in a server environment or a multimedia encoding
    environment.

    > Can you provide a single example of how any Norton product is taking any
    > resources away from the system? Can you provide any evidence of loss of
    > memory space or any other consequence of Norton?

    This is trivial to demonstrate. Write an application that creates
    ten thousand 100 byte files. Benchmark it with AV on versus off.

    An anti-virus program can cripple a server. Extrapolate downwards
    for the effects on average users. Grandma won't notice. Bill the
    power user will.

    > Have you ever read a magazine article that demonstrated any support of the
    > "resource hog" allegation?

    My own experiences are enough for me.

    > Have you ever found a website that can prove that resources are lost when a
    > Norton product is installed?

    At least one timer is lost. Obviously some nontrivial amount of opcodes
    are inserted into the execute pipeline. Obviously data signatures are
    saved to the hard disk. Obviously a footprint is consumed in memory.

    > Bobby
  23. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    > Good luck with whatever alternative you choose. Whatever product you
    > choose, it will be a step backward from the protection provided by Norton
    > Internet Security.

    I`ve found Dyfuca on at least two systems i`ve looked at over the last 3
    months with a fully up-to-date NIS installed.

    --
    Please add the word "newsgroup" in the subject line of personal emails
    **** My email address includes "ngspamtrap" and "@btinternet.com" ****
  24. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    > My guess is that maybe AVG <snip>

    ....and on a friends' system (one of about 15 he's got) he suspected
    there was something not right - a quick scan with Sysclean later, and it
    came up with 3 currently "inactive" viruses sat on the HD.

    Avast appears to have a better detection rate at present.

    --
    Please add the word "newsgroup" in the subject line of personal emails
    **** My email address includes "ngspamtrap" and "@btinternet.com" ****
  25. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    On Tue, 27 Sep 2005 16:04:37 -0500, "Kevin Childers"
    <kchilder@mail.win.org> wrote:

    > Environment is a factor, production or desktop, high demand operations
    >or low, and even then the user level effects the perception of what is a
    >significant speed hit and what is not.
    >
    > In some environments it is even a good idea to have virus servers that
    >act as filters for all data into and out of a particular network segment.
    >Mail servers in particular usually have a series of server layers to filter
    >out spam and then viruses, before the actual mail servers.
    >

    Who are you replying to????? I didn't say anything about speed loss
    and for a home pc, I don't think you want to have virus servers if you
    have a router already. Of course if you want to use another pc just
    for the virus server, whatever.
  26. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    Notan wrote:

    > "NoNoBadDog!" wrote:
    >
    >>And I would argue equally strongly your assertion that Norton products are
    >>Resource hogs.
    >>They are not. On a healthy system, they have no impact on system
    >>performance. A quick review of the Processes tab under Task Manager will
    >>prove to anyone with Norton install that it does not take up any more
    >>resources than any other application (of any kind).
    >>
    >><snip>
    >
    >
    > I remember this discussion from another thread and, if I remember correctly,
    > you were the only poster that didn't believe Norton products to be resource
    > hogs.

    He's not the only one - I haven't had problems with NAV on my Dim 4550
    or 8400.
  27. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    Sparky Spartacus wrote:
    >
    > Notan wrote:
    >
    > > "NoNoBadDog!" wrote:
    > >
    > >>And I would argue equally strongly your assertion that Norton products are
    > >>Resource hogs.
    > >>They are not. On a healthy system, they have no impact on system
    > >>performance. A quick review of the Processes tab under Task Manager will
    > >>prove to anyone with Norton install that it does not take up any more
    > >>resources than any other application (of any kind).
    > >>
    > >><snip>
    > >
    > >
    > > I remember this discussion from another thread and, if I remember correctly,
    > > you were the only poster that didn't believe Norton products to be resource
    > > hogs.
    >
    > He's not the only one - I haven't had problems with NAV on my Dim 4550
    > or 8400.

    Minor difference... While I'm sure some people don't appear to have any type
    of system slowdown, the vast majority do. In addition, NoNo is adamant about
    the fact that the slowdowns people see are in *no way* related to Norton.

    Notan
  28. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    Notan wrote:

    > Sparky Spartacus wrote:
    >
    >>Notan wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>"NoNoBadDog!" wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>And I would argue equally strongly your assertion that Norton products are
    >>>>Resource hogs.
    >>>>They are not. On a healthy system, they have no impact on system
    >>>>performance. A quick review of the Processes tab under Task Manager will
    >>>>prove to anyone with Norton install that it does not take up any more
    >>>>resources than any other application (of any kind).
    >>>>
    >>>><snip>
    >>>
    >>>I remember this discussion from another thread and, if I remember correctly,
    >>>you were the only poster that didn't believe Norton products to be resource
    >>>hogs.
    >>
    >>He's not the only one - I haven't had problems with NAV on my Dim 4550
    >>or 8400.
    >
    > Minor difference... While I'm sure some people don't appear to have any type
    > of system slowdown, the vast majority do.

    If you're going to claim a "vast majority" you need a couple of cites,
    otherwise the vast majority don't. Remember, people don't complain in
    Usenet about stuff that works okay.
  29. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    "Sparky Spartacus" <Sparky@universalexports.org> wrote in message
    news:KfN_e.2548$Ge5.1811@fe10.lga...
    > Notan wrote:
    >
    >> Sparky Spartacus wrote:
    >>
    >>>Notan wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>"NoNoBadDog!" wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>>And I would argue equally strongly your assertion that Norton products
    >>>>>are
    >>>>>Resource hogs.
    >>>>>They are not. On a healthy system, they have no impact on system
    >>>>>performance. A quick review of the Processes tab under Task Manager
    >>>>>will
    >>>>>prove to anyone with Norton install that it does not take up any more
    >>>>>resources than any other application (of any kind).
    >>>>>
    >>>>><snip>
    >>>>
    >>>>I remember this discussion from another thread and, if I remember
    >>>>correctly,
    >>>>you were the only poster that didn't believe Norton products to be
    >>>>resource
    >>>>hogs.
    >>>
    >>>He's not the only one - I haven't had problems with NAV on my Dim 4550
    >>>or 8400.
    >>
    >> Minor difference... While I'm sure some people don't appear to have any
    >> type
    >> of system slowdown, the vast majority do.
    >
    > If you're going to claim a "vast majority" you need a couple of cites,
    > otherwise the vast majority don't. Remember, people don't complain in
    > Usenet about stuff that works okay.


    Anyone running an 800mhz Celeron w/128mb of RAM, WinXP, and Norton NIS
    likely can't find their butt with a map, much less locate usenet - or even
    be aware that it exists ;-)

    "Slow" is a relative thing, to be sure. I won't beat a dead horse here, but
    will only say that my 2.0GHz and 3.0GHz machines both take a visibly
    noticeable performance hit from NAV2005 or even McAfee 8 - when minimally
    configured.


    Stew
  30. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    <Rob> wrote in message news:ti0kj1p7i6h2mes0f83m9hgn535f0mbrku@4ax.com...
    > On Tue, 27 Sep 2005 16:04:37 -0500, "Kevin Childers"
    > <kchilder@mail.win.org> wrote:
    >
    > > Environment is a factor, production or desktop, high demand
    operations
    > >or low, and even then the user level effects the perception of what is a
    > >significant speed hit and what is not.
    > >
    > > In some environments it is even a good idea to have virus servers
    that
    > >act as filters for all data into and out of a particular network segment.
    > >Mail servers in particular usually have a series of server layers to
    filter
    > >out spam and then viruses, before the actual mail servers.
    > >
    >
    > Who are you replying to????? I didn't say anything about speed loss
    > and for a home pc, I don't think you want to have virus servers if you
    > have a router already. Of course if you want to use another pc just
    > for the virus server, whatever.

    That was just an example of how far the demands on single system
    resources can go when using anti-virus software.

    As for routers and anti-virus servers, your talking about separate
    devices serving different purposes.

    Separate anti-virus servers are an extreme measure meant to deal with a
    particular environment. Not something the average home user would need.
    Although, not something that the average home user couldn't have using an
    older PC. In many instances such single purpose machines need not be top of
    the line. Sort of like real world jobs, you don't need rocket scientist to
    perform simple repetitive jobs day in and day out.

    KC
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