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How to quit WoW

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  • PC gaming
  • Laptops
  • World Of Warcraft
  • Video Games
Last response: in Video Games
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August 4, 2006 1:33:34 PM

I think this is a valid question.
For all those of you who have 100+ days played especially those who stopped after it.

Personally I started playing WoW because my old desktop died(parts of it) and I was going to be travelling in Europe so I got a laptop.
My guild died mostly so it's lost it's appeal

Oblivion would have gotten me to stop playing WoW but I simply don't like the performance I get on a laptop/my laptop.
So plan on buying new computer as soon as conroe+nforce mobo is reasonable price(month-2?)

Mostly I think it would be funny to hear some stories of WoW addiction.
Yes this means you who has hit High Warlord/Grand Marshall and have a slew of 60's. You might still be playing but admit it your hooked =P

Oh btw I'll sell my account for $350
I really should stop playing...

More about : quit wow

August 4, 2006 3:07:18 PM

I played a couple days of their trial, then quit. I just couldn't stop thinking of a girl I know who missed a final exam because she was playing WoW, doing some dungeon run, and couldn't leave her guild. She failed many classes that semester. Every once in a while I see her up on campus, going back to those classes she tanked. I've never asked if she still plays WoW though.
August 4, 2006 8:25:22 PM

I quit a month ago, didn't have a "slew" of 60's or pvp often. I raided too much and took a break. Then through a rush of blood to the head I gave my account to an incredibly addicted friend :p . I also did poorly in school because of WoW. Not so much the game but my lack of control, just like everyone else :>
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August 5, 2006 1:43:01 PM

As with most gamers, its not the "addiction" its the lack of control of the gamer.
August 6, 2006 11:12:26 PM

Quote:
I think this is a valid question.
For all those of you who have 100+ days played especially those who stopped after it.

Personally I started playing WoW because my old desktop died(parts of it) and I was going to be travelling in Europe so I got a laptop.
My guild died mostly so it's lost it's appeal

Oblivion would have gotten me to stop playing WoW but I simply don't like the performance I get on a laptop/my laptop.
So plan on buying new computer as soon as conroe+nforce mobo is reasonable price(month-2?)

Mostly I think it would be funny to hear some stories of WoW addiction.
Yes this means you who has hit High Warlord/Grand Marshall and have a slew of 60's. You might still be playing but admit it your hooked =P

Oh btw I'll sell my account for $350
I really should stop playing...


Its all about priorities and not addictions.

Mate, here's what I do:

I put all essentials before I play any game (remember, it is your hobby, after all--its NOT a lifestyle, and never should be).

I work full-time (10 hour days) so by the time I go home, exercise for a hour-and-a-half, cook dinner and chill for an hour or two, well, its time for bed. And thats important to note: keep regular healthy meals, exercise and sleep!

That means I often cant get to a game until the weekend and again, you need to do all the proper essentials of a healthy existence before you enjoy your hobbies.

Look at the stories that you've seen thus far; people neglecting important studies etc., and I've had to learn the hard way through university too: gaming doesn't pay!

We'd all love to sit on our arses and game all day but that is a fantasy unless you're a tester. Re-prioritise, re-charge and time your game time; put it to the bottom of the list for things to do.
August 7, 2006 1:20:11 AM

PS, I'm pretty passionate about making sure I have some game time up my sleeve. To be frank, I found it hard to lessen my game time when I was in my late teens, early 20s, but its very important that you do.

I'm 28--not some old geezer giving advice--but I speak the truth when I say I used to burn days (not hours) on games: Age of Empires 2, Diablo 2, Baldurs Gate 1 & 2, Civ 3, original Unreal Tournament etc...*oh the fond memories*...

I still get itchy feet today--wishing to neglect my life to game--but re-prioritise mentally man, and boy it makes a difference. Not to mention that I thoroughly enjoy the actual game time I get these days; like a child who gets an allowance only sparingly. :lol: 
August 7, 2006 9:02:24 PM

to be honest i c nothing special about wow nor oblivion, gues im not a fan of thse game types
August 7, 2006 10:57:41 PM

Does anyone on this forum think they were or currently are addicted in the clinical sense to WoW? I mean, addicted like one would be addicted to drugs or alcohol, completely unable to cut down or cut off the game? Or is this more an issue about will power and self-control?
August 7, 2006 11:07:29 PM

Isn't all addiction about willpower and self-control? Sure, no one is physically addicted to WoW, but you can be emotionally dependent on things too. People who miss important events (like college finals) because they were playing a video game definitely has problems they need to deal with. Calling it just an 'issue about will power and self-control' I think belittles what can be a very serious problem.
And no one here's going to fess up to an addiction like that. They're too busy playing to surf forums :) 
August 7, 2006 11:51:16 PM

Quote:
Does anyone on this forum think they were or currently are addicted in the clinical sense to WoW? I mean, addicted like one would be addicted to drugs or alcohol, completely unable to cut down or cut off the game? Or is this more an issue about will power and self-control?


I think its a case of the latter, Rob. Drugs and alcohol invoke physically addictive behaviour from the abuser. Games are about one enjoying a hobby immensely and turning it into a lifestyle choice so its mentally addictive, for sure, but to compare it with drugs and booze is on the wrong track, I believe; its not comparing apples with apples, if you know what I mean.
August 7, 2006 11:56:55 PM

Quote:
Isn't all addiction about willpower and self-control?


No mate, its not. Drugs and booze do invoke physical addictions from the body that have nothing to do with willpower or self-control. Dont get me wrong, what you mentioned is a part of it, but its important to not misunderstand the nature of certain addictions; particularly when it comes to drugs and booze as opposed to gaming.

Quote:
important events (like college finals) because they were playing a video game definitely has problems they need to deal with


Absolutely. They have light psychological issues to deal with (a need to recognise where their life's priorities lie, for example), and for some, those issues go deeper and require more prolonged professional help if their parents cant get them to sort it out.

Quote:
Calling it just an 'issue about will power and self-control' I think belittles what can be a very serious problem.


Definitely.
August 8, 2006 12:29:00 AM

Fair enough, Bill. I wasn't posing the question as a sarcastic, rhetorical one. In fact, I'm intrigued by this issue and have talked with some experts for a few articles I'm working on for Twitch, and they compare game addiction to gambling addiction. One addiction is recognized as a medical condition by the psychiatric community (the latter) and one is not (the former). But never having talked to someone who would claim he or she was actually addicted to a game and sought treatment, I'm not ready to make a judgment either way. I do believe it's possible for game addiction to be a real condition, however, since I fully recognize that games are powerful media that can get their hooks in people prett quickly.
August 8, 2006 12:40:49 AM

Absolutely mate. I certainly didnt interpret your question that way and I apologise if my response read a little forthright; I can assure you I was simply trying to be objective because mate, in all candor, I've been a games addict.

I've been there and fixed the probs myself; although do find it hard--at times--to not fall into the old habits of missing meals, rarely exercising and rarely socialising (I was 21, in my 3rd year of uni, had time to burn, and age of empires 2, unreal tournament and baldurs gate were proving to be chronically addictive for me) . :lol: 

Mate, I think hardcore gaming's biggest problem is the anti-social behaviour that it delivers.

Mate, I'm thrilled that you're having a look at it. I think its progressive of you to do so as an editor at this esteemed--and well loved--site. I'm a huge fan of what you guys do and have been since I started coming here years ago.
August 8, 2006 4:24:29 AM

Quote:
Drugs and booze do invoke physical addictions from the body


Actually, only drugs invoke a physical addiction. Alcohol has no proven physical addiction properties. It is an emotional and mentally addictive substance.
August 8, 2006 5:26:55 AM

WRONG! Absolutely and utterly wrong:

There is a wealth of information on the physical dependence associated with alcoholism and alcohol consumption. Here's just a taste:

Wikipedia as a Start

Behavioral Medicine Associates

These are but two.

Alcohol is an addictive drug and physical dependence is a bi-product of the drug's use, particularly when consumed to excess.
August 8, 2006 2:19:30 PM

Personally I think the physical component of an addiction is not the hardest part to beat. The mental craving is at least as bad and probably worse than the craving of the body. Not that I'm much of an expert in the addiction field although I think almost anyone has some form of addiction going on, and not every addiction is that bad a thing either.

It is the net effect of an addiction that determines the problematic aspect of it, and the most difficult thing of all is to "objectively" evaluate the actual effect on yourself and others.
August 8, 2006 2:27:27 PM

I agree. Heroine abuse has touched many people I know and they don't keep going back for physical cravings, it's the mental addiction that lasts even after all the physical withdrawl has passed. Bad stuff.
I played the WoW 10day trial and I liked it. Alot. And that bothered me, so I didn't buy in. I really believe it's possible to become addicted to these games.
Another note, my wife was saying that video games cause your brain to release the same chemicals as sex does. Anyone know if that's true, or it just myth? It's probably a half truth, taken out of context to sound bad, but you never know.
August 8, 2006 5:38:55 PM

To some extent.
They are involved with the pleasure center of brain.
Should I know the medical name? yes.
Do I remember? no.
Gets same response as eating sex running and many other things.
Just on different levels.
Just as people can be addicted to sex/drugs/gaming/eating/exercising.
Just some addictions have more serious side effects.
Certain people have chemical imbalances or imporperly functioning glands here and that's what cause certain people to have an "addictive personality".
Oh and btw this thread wasn't intended to be a serious debate, if I used the term addiction I didn't mean it in that sense, although there are some people who can lose their lives to not eating or going to work/school. I just move every 3 months and am sick of meeting new people all over again, gets frustrating after awhile, so I don't bother and play games(Still incredibly social while at school, in fraternity do sports 6 times a week etc)
Just the 6 months a year I work I don't do jack but game sleep drink work.
August 8, 2006 7:21:08 PM

I think it's BS.

I would categorize myself as a heavy heavy gamer.
I ran a "gaming" club in college.

I have spent the overwhelming part of my free time for the last 25 years gaming on the computer, on a board, cards, or paper and pencil.

The provide me with constant but fun challenges I need.
Did it hurt my grades some in college? Yes.
Could I be more sucessfull in my career? Yes.

(But I am so well known in my field when I meet others in my field I have been asked many times when I give my name if I am "That" John Doe. )

If I had to do it over would I have worked harder at College?
Spent 70hrs a week instead of 45hours a week working?
No.
I ENJOY what I do.

Gamers who lose themselves in games have mental issues.
It's not the game that causes those issues.

Losers who get fired or dont care for their families?
Last time I checked, they always existed and would still not have met responsibilities.
August 8, 2006 8:04:07 PM

Quote:
Speaking of WoW addiction...

BomberBill, this is the article I referenced in my first post:
http://www.twitchguru.com/2006/08/08/world_of_warcraft_...


I couldn't read much.
I got to the doctor stating that the kid would rather play WoW than deal with his messed up family.
So the family complains to the doctor to intervent.
While I agree there can be problems.
He didn't want to deal with his family anyway.
I for one enjoyed playing NWN over watching/listening to my parents yell at each other and call the cops =P

I'd use the example of someone who didn't eat/sleep died of dhydration or the parents who left their kid to die as true examples. Although the game might have just been the mechanism. Had it not been for wow they may have done the same thing under different circumstances. It's easy to blame games and not the people. I think that is a point to be made.
August 8, 2006 11:17:02 PM

slightly off point, but completly on topic, i would like to offer this; ive never played wow, i hate midievil timeline games. i was however head over heel into MXO before it died. :x

i would get home from work crack a beer and just play for hours on end, on weekends forgoing even sleep to keep playing and advancing, now it may not look to trouble some, what ive written here, but i have a wife, and youll notice i didnt mention her during the MXO addiction. things got frosty for a while and i re-prioritzed, things in the relationship got better and i actually started leaving the house for rec time.

i dont play mmorpg or what ever the hell theyre called anymore. i just dont have the will power to ration my self. well that and in my opinion there arent any good ones right now :twisted:
August 9, 2006 12:47:40 AM

Let me just say, this is the most fascinating thread that I've read in ages and all of the posts have been interesting to me (a rarity on the boards, I must say).

We all love games; we all love how they're getting better and how they take us to different worlds. We all love how we get to manipulate the game enviornment and be who we want to be and act how we want. Its fun, its a hobby and we all dig the challenge associated with it.

I do feel myself releasing seratonin and dopamine when I get involved in a hot game; I can feel it! You all can too providing your conscious to it.

I haven't been to the cinema in over a year and apart from fishing and playing and watching sports the only other things I'm really into is gaming and politics with the former taking precedence over the latter most of the time. :wink:

But there is a point--like with anything--where one can take it too far.

True story: I enjoy the highly addictive online multiplayer game, Kohan 2: Kings of War; I play it most nights and a dude with over 2500 games tells me about how he had his priorities as such:

1. Kohan 2
2. Family
3. Work
4. Personal health--food and sleep.


He was that hardcore that after gaming for 29 hours straight--after a full week's of work--he crashed into and passed out on his keyboard and woke up six hours later to continue from where he left off with a new game.

He almost lost his wife, his job and his health (he lost 45 pounds in a month and when you only weigh 175 and are 5'11 thats pretty hardcore on the body).

That's addiction; when you just cant stop the passion for doing something you physically and mentally adore.

We haven't even touched the surface on "addictive personalities" and those who have a genetic pre-disposition towards such behavior.

It is a fascinating subject, this one.
August 9, 2006 6:52:25 PM

Now you've got me thinking I have an addictive personality :/ . Perhaps i do, before MMO's i was addicted to different games in short bursts of a couple months and moved on. Then i found Star Wars Galaxies, which broke the pattern as i was addicted for 6 months. After that I returned to semi-addiction and WoW came along. I've been addicted since release, and am about to return to it with friends. Not sure if i should return as i've been warcraft-sober for a month as my desktop died :p . I never forgot to eat but i never really excersize in the first place. I'm not nearly as old as some of you, 16. My grades suffered because of WoW but even I knew that wasn't the real reason. Anyone that blames games for influence can't face themselves. People that target the GTA series and MMOs for mistakes in society don't realize there has to be intent along with the influence. This post is all over but i can't stand it when killers say the game made them kill.

Oh and btw this is a short post of interesting ideas in comparison to one about the validity of religion and the bible. Guess where that was? WoW realm forums :D . It was over 25 pages long with citations of einstein and the like.
August 10, 2006 4:22:27 PM

Quote:
... my wife was saying that video games cause your brain to release the same chemicals as sex does. Anyone know if that's true, or it just myth? It's probably a half truth, taken out of context to sound bad, but you never know.


Hi, I study psychology, I am going in my second year now, so be gentle, but I did learn this year about the pleasure centre in the brain. They have done experiments with rats in the past that got electrodes implanted inside the brain located at what they believed would be the pleasure centre. Next they made a lever the rats could push which would let a current flow as to stimulate their own brain 8O . I know sounds sick he! But guess what, the rats pressed the lever continuesly, even forgot to eat and drink. Similar experiments have been performed on humans, but they did place the electrodes some bit further from the pleasure centre for ethical reasons. The participants reported warm feelings and sometimes even better than sex!! Imagine that! What is simulated here is other brain cells telling the pleasure centre to release dopamine. Lots of brain cells are connected to the pleasure centre and they can signal to the pleasure centre in the form of low voltage currents. That's what the reseachers simulated.

Here some references from Wikipedia; the pleasure centre is known as the nucleus accumbens.

"This nucleus is thought to play an important role in reward, pleasure, and addiction."

"Dopaminergic input from the VTA is thought to modulate the activity of neurons within the nucleus accumbens. These terminals are also the site of action of highly-addictive drugs such as cocaine and amphetamine, which cause a several-fold increase in dopamine levels in the nucleus accumbens. In addition to cocaine and amphetamine, almost every drug abused by humans has been shown to increase dopamine levels in the nucleus accumbens."

"In the 1950s, Olds and Milner implanted electrodes into rat Nucleus accumbens and found that that the rat chose to press a level which stimulated it. It continued to prefer this even over stopping to eat or drink. This suggests that the area is the 'pleasure center' of the brain."

"Although the nucleus accumbens has traditionally been studied for its role in addiction, it plays an equal role in processing many rewards such as food, sex, and video games. A recent study found that it is involved in the regulation of emotions induced by music [1] , perhaps consequent to its role in mediating dopamine release."

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nucleus_accumbens

I cut out the interesting stuff, for your convenience

So the answer to your question: yes, the brain does release the same chemicals in the pleasure centre with videogames as with sex.
August 10, 2006 8:05:02 PM

I knew women were overrated.
August 10, 2006 11:45:35 PM

Quote:
I played a couple days of their trial, then quit. I just couldn't stop thinking of a girl I know who missed a final exam because she was playing WoW, doing some dungeon run, and couldn't leave her guild. She failed many classes that semester. Every once in a while I see her up on campus, going back to those classes she tanked. I've never asked if she still plays WoW though.
That is absolutely rediculous. How can anyone value anything over personal education? The only thing that should only EVER come before education is family, period.
August 10, 2006 11:51:32 PM

Quote:

True story: I enjoy the highly addictive online multiplayer game, Kohan 2: Kings of War; I play it most nights and a dude with over 2500 games tells me about how he had his priorities as such:

1. Kohan 2
2. Family
3. Work
4. Personal health--food and sleep.


He was that hardcore that after gaming for 29 hours straight--after a full week's of work--he crashed into and passed out on his keyboard and woke up six hours later to continue from where he left off with a new game.

He almost lost his wife, his job and his health (he lost 45 pounds in a month and when you only weigh 175 and are 5'11 thats pretty hardcore on the body).

That's addiction; when you just cant stop the passion for doing something you physically and mentally adore.
Jesus H Christ, I don't I have EVER been that addicted to ANYTHING.
September 12, 2006 10:01:29 PM

The worst part of WoW is that if you want to have even decent gear you have to play obscene hours.

I have 3x60's, 1x49, 2x29's(twinks), and some other lowbies not worth mentioning.

I have taken 2 characters to champioin(rank 10) twice. Had to reachive it for the updated pvp sets.

A mage in full tier 2 thats all decked out.

If you want to have the good gear you either have to A: get in a guild that progress very well and raids constently without a high turnover rate.

B: PvP 12+ hours a day and if you slow down the decrease per week is such a large penalty it makes it that much worse.

C: Pay a chinaman (no offense) to pvp your character 24x7.

The worse part is now that pvp is multiple servers wide BG's are going around the clock. Before they use to stop at like 3 or 4 am and not start back up til 8 so some pychos got a few hours of sleep. Now its impossible.

I am in the military so im TDY for 3 months which helps with addiction being I have no choice, I cant play. When I get back if I dont start raiding 5 days a week I will probably be kicked form the guild but at least I know I could get $600+ for my account lol.
September 13, 2006 1:45:21 PM

I joined WoW about a year ago, just after i had started uni. I wanted to see for myself what all the fuss about the game was, as i'd heard stories of people killing themselves over it.

The first 4 days I played, i hated the game. I Couldnt understand what was so good about it. Then once i actually started playing it properly and got to see some of the high level players, i was totaly hooked and couldnt stop thinking about it.

Personally i think their is some addiction, in that you want to be like all the cool looking high level players, and play and play untill you get there. This is because when you start out, your character basicly looks like a piece of shit, and so you start to imagine how much youl own everyone once youre a level 60.

I once played the game for 16 hours straight (I EAT OF COURSE).

It's strange to think that to begin with I just couldnt understand what was that good about the game, but in the end I just couldnt get enough of it. Then i finally got bored and realised that the game often feels like a bad halloween party. Also that all players do is try to get the best gear, and be cooler than the others, basicly means that theres allways gunna be petty arguments over who get what. I found myself getting upset when i got blamed for something i didnt cause and got kicked out of an MC raid-which is pretty pathetic when it's just a computer game, that's an example of how much some people (me) can get absorbed into the virtual world.

So all in all, Im kind of glad i got to experience the game, however I do really think it's addictive in the way that you can get obsessed over it, when its not even all that good. Or is it?
I recently met an old friend at a party, and ended up talking about computer games, he mentioned WoW, and i said that im glad i don't play it anymore, and how addictive it is. He told me about this guy i used to know years ago, and that all he does is sit there in a pile of rubbish, stuffing his face and playing wow. He even get's people to go to the shop for him to get more booze/food to keep him going.

I dont think that you have to have mental issues to get addicted. Simply, if say in the future there will be a game which looks and feels like reality, yet you can do anything you want, and so it would be far better than a lot of peoples poor, boring lives-Would it be a mental dissorder to play it? even though its better than life?
For WoW though, You possibly have to be the kind of person who would play any game for hours and hours all day anyway, like me.

To be honset, most of the leveling up is really boring when you compare it to playing other non MMORPG games. Its so repetative. But theirs a kind of addictive satisfaction that you get each time you level up, like once youve done some household chores, or a piece of work, then you feel good for completing them.

Still, I often miss my friends and wonder of the fun their having. But I am glad i don't play anymore. Ive actually got into reading books since i gave up, and get out of the house more.


Im now looking forward to playing BF2142, and next year ther's a Pirate MMO coming out called Pirates of the burning sea, which you should check out.
March 5, 2007 3:10:49 PM

I've started playing wow for a few weeks now.
It might already be 2 months now...

I think the reason why i like it so much, is because it's so easy to accomplish things and i'm sure i WILL accomplish them.

While in real life, i'm not going to say i'm a loser...but it's a lot harder to accomplish anything, in wow, you just insert some time and eventually you'll get good at it. Everyone can level and get lvl 70, but becoming the best at my job...it's a little harder, I might even not succeed at it.

Somewhere my addiction lies in the fact that I have a goal in wow and i will accomplish it, while in real life I don't have a real goal and i'm not sure i would accomplish it if I had one.
So it's just easyer to hide from reality in a stupid game.
March 5, 2007 6:54:01 PM

there is an easy steps program to quit playing wow.

1) Stop paying your subscription
2) Sell your account to make a tidy profit
3) replace the addiction with something else, like smoking or heroin
4) going to pubs to get smashed allso helps, provided you are of legal age
March 12, 2007 2:31:56 AM

Simple -- Play Guild Wars.
March 12, 2007 12:57:08 PM

Another long gone thread revived, but i applaud the choice. It was one of the better ones.

Quote:
Somewhere my addiction lies in the fact that I have a goal in wow and i will accomplish it, while in real life I don't have a real goal and i'm not sure i would accomplish it if I had one.


The reason why you do not succeed in real life is not that you cannot accomplish anything, it is that you do not know what to accomplish. In real life, it is often, if not always, up to yourself to set your own goals. Although that may seem scary at first (which is why you get parential guidance during growing up if you're fortunate) in the end it means freedom.

If you want to be a follower, and follow the goals someone else is setting for you, you better be damn sure that you can trust that person or you will find yourself exploited. Don't feel too bad about it, you're not alone. In fact, this is a state that many if not most people are in.

Truly setting your own goals will mean freedom, it will not mean a sweet ride necessarily, it may even be very painful at times, but it will mean you've experienced true freedom (of mind). Setting those goals does not automatically mean you'll reach them, but being a free mind you can always readjust them. And be sure to generate a new goal once you've achieved all previous ones. The fun is in the process of accomplishing your goals, not in to have them accomplished.
March 12, 2007 6:01:59 PM

Yeah don't let your boss exploit you then dump you when your contract is up. Go around him and find yourself something.
Forehead slap.
Yay for unemployment....
March 12, 2007 11:20:16 PM

Just give your account away to someone, anyone and ask them to change the password and never give it back no matter how much you beg later on! Worked for me.
March 14, 2007 4:12:35 PM

I was a hardcore wow addict a year ago. I ended up quitting just becuase i couldnt handle being indoors all summer and my friends were seriously starting to worry about me. I was the whole schabang in wow, guildmaster, 12+hours a day, made Highwarlord and all. I was just totally immersed in the game. In the end it just came down to real life or fake. Had to get my priorities straight. I was playing the game for 14+ hours a day. Will never forget the day i hit the delete character button.
March 14, 2007 4:45:07 PM

Anybody watch the WOW episode of Southpark... it was one of my favorites :lol: 
March 14, 2007 4:51:40 PM

yeah that was great! "MOM, BATHROOM!"
March 15, 2007 1:50:44 PM

Gotta go with BigMac here. I gave up smoking recently after 15 years of 20 fags a day and it did not involve any patches or chewing gum. The first 3-4 days I felt the body craving (for the lack of a better word) for the nicotine.

After that it was the hardest part where I realized that I smoked mostly when I had nothing to do. Proved that more than the physical addiction it was a habit. Took about a month and a half to kill the habit. In the end I was surprised that it was so easy.

Today I even manage to smoke a fag or 2 when drinking (social drinker and smoker)
September 28, 2007 6:46:57 PM

Im a WoW addict of sorts, i get home from school, i play WoW, i skip homework, thinking ill do it later... i never do... i play till 11 o'clock, i tell my mom to f*** off sometimes when she says stop playing... I never go out with friends and my skin is as pale as a vampires. Im trying to quit WoW but its very hard.

What pisses me off is that those jack asses at Blizzard know this is happening. They know their game is ruining peoples lives but they dont care a **** as long as they get their £7000000 a month. The reason WoW is so addictive is because its progressive, you play for months and u end up with this epic gear, if you quit, you think, why did i do all that work for nothing. So you keep on playing. I have this problem, i play because i cant bear to stop playing and lose all that progress, theres always something better to get, some better gear, better weapons. And why? because Blizzard keep MAKING better gear and armour, more expansions, more challenges, they keep people addicted, keep them inside their rooms... keep them so addicted they only care about WoW, nothing but WoW.
September 28, 2007 8:16:12 PM

fact of life, Blizzard is a company, Companies loyalty is to their shareholders and not their customers therefore, they only care about making money, now if they think it will improve their image by doing some "good" things then they will do it, but only because it will make them more money later on. Therefore Blizzard doesn't want to help people who are addicted, if it was so that 100,000 people a day were quitting because a method of avoiding the addictive side of it had been found, OR they were getting sued once every five minutes AND losing they would make it less addictive, but for now...
September 28, 2007 8:54:00 PM

I played WoW for 3 months I think... my highest char was 18, next was 14, two 12's and an 8.... it was fun and all, but I just never got hooked on it like so many others.

Now Diablo 2 on the other hand.... that was a 6 year addiction for me causing many nights of lost sleep and such. Did real poorly in High School... but not because of gaming, I was just bored with classes and sick of the teachers...

I don't play D2 anymore though (because of my internet situation) but I do play a bit of Oblivion...

I'm not hooked on any game anymore really, I still play some Starcraft or Warcraft 3 every now and then... actually I used to be quite hooked on those too... in and around my 6 year D2 addiction... And actually Diablo in general for me was addicting ever since I first played it... Blizzard has a funny way of making some amazing games that people just seem to get hooked on.

For a while I blamed it on subliminal messages in the games... now I just realize that it's a personal thing... you either put important things first, or you put the game first... either way it's a personal choice (or addiction... but I think they're kinda the same... nobody puts a gun to anybody's head and tells them to play)
September 28, 2007 9:49:48 PM

actually, for those people who say there is no physical addiction to WoW you are dead wrong, true, it doesn't inject you with crack every time you play, but your brain can release endorphines that will make you feel VERY good and WoW is very good at stimulating that reaction.
October 1, 2007 9:53:14 AM

after two years, being in almost all instances that wow has to offer, with around 150 gameplay hours I turned off my pc while i was in middle of a raid. And since then I never touched wow and anything that has to do with it. Simple as that :) 
October 1, 2007 2:33:17 PM

You can probably cure your addiction to WoW and other MMORPGs permanently by playing Neverwinter Nights for several years. In NWN people make persistent worlds which basically are like small MMORPGs because they run 24/7 and you character's stats and gear are saved on the server. However, since servers are ran by ordinary people like you and not by some commercial company, there is no guarantee that next day they won't delete your character. After 3-4 years and 30-40 wipes or jumps to new persistent worlds and adventures you just don't care so seriously anymore about your character's items and progression in skills even if you've spent many months or even a whole year playing on a server. By the way, there are many "ordinary" people who manage to develop and take care of their NWN persistent world much better than some commercial companies take care of their MMORPGs. Of course, these people usually tend to be professional programmers who are avid RPG and NWN enthusiasts on their spare time. Commercial MMORPGs just cannot reach the high level of role-play, fun and complexity which can be found on free-of-charge NWN servers run by skillful and imaginative enthusiasts and complemented with experienced DMs.

Something to conclude with, there would be much less serious addictions to MMORPGs if companies would do regular character wipes every year or two!

stitch19 said:
after two years, being in almost all instances that wow has to offer, with around 150 gameplay hours I turned off my pc while i was in middle of a raid. And since then I never touched wow and anything that has to do with it. Simple as that :) 

Gratz on lvl up (irl)! :D 
October 1, 2007 2:57:53 PM

1st character, 2 weeks to 32, 2nd character 3 weeks to 45, barely enjoyed a moment, there was a few, like the first mount, owning twinks, owning gankers, but that's about it. I never really enjoyed my guild (they were all 65+ and doing their own things), the quests were too repetitive, the long travel times (who needs loading screens when you gotta fly for that long?)

Bought WoW (1 mth free) - 30$
Bought BC - 30$
Bought 2 mth card - 20$

Big waste = PRICELESS!

I played ~2000 hours of Guild Wars before WoW (I did watch a friend play from time to time, there's not much of a learning curve).

I don't even know why I was playing it, sometimes I couldn't go on for a half hour.
October 1, 2007 4:43:29 PM

personally never played WoW. However, I have friends that have had relationships ruined because of the game and others who simply "dropped off the face of the earth" because of it. Maybe this is part of why I never started playing, because I saw what it did to others
October 1, 2007 8:56:48 PM

I think that is the case for me as well, I'm not risking it
October 1, 2007 11:40:51 PM

i saw something on tv that was talking about wow. they were interviewing people from the development's team or something and one said that the objective was to make people play at least 500 hours. let me say that they must have accomplished at least a part of their objectives.

that is how our system works. what people want they get if they have the money. so ultimately the cause is the players not the company. the only way something is going to happen about all that it s going to be only either the government or the players initiative. i dont think the government is going to do something about it because it absolutely has no interest in doing so.

so it s up to us gamers.

after we pay for wow we may well be ending paying again for lawyers or therapists.
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