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Office 2003 speech/handwriting recognition feature violate..

Last response: in Windows XP
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May 11, 2004 9:32:18 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

In finally getting rid of ctfmon.exe, I discovered this article:

http://support.microsoft.com/?id=823586

I quote:

"After you install Office and then you turn on speech recognition and
handwriting recognition, these features become part of the operating system.
You cannot remove these features, even with the Maintenance Mode of Office
Setup."

Is this a built-in OS feature, not related to Office 2003, which just gets
turned on as necessary? If not (in my very inexperienced assessment), I
would think it could be considered illegal because other, non-MS
applications don't have the luxury of permanently becoming part of Windows.
Such low-level integration could be construed as an anticompetitive
advantage.

Please fill me in if any of you are familiar with the legal stuff.

Bob
Anonymous
May 11, 2004 9:32:19 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

Questions regarding "legal stuff" should be addressed to:

Microsoft Corporate and Legal Affairs
Microsoft Corporation
One Microsoft Way
Redmond, WA 98052-6399
USA

--
Carey Frisch
Microsoft MVP
Windows XP - Shell/User

Be Smart! Protect your PC!
http://www.microsoft.com/security/protect/

------------------------------------------------------------------------

"Bob" <nobody@nowhere.com> wrote in message:
news:u30cw85NEHA.2740@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...

| In finally getting rid of ctfmon.exe, I discovered this article:
|
| http://support.microsoft.com/?id=823586
|
| I quote:
|
| "After you install Office and then you turn on speech recognition and
| handwriting recognition, these features become part of the operating system.
| You cannot remove these features, even with the Maintenance Mode of Office
| Setup."
|
| Is this a built-in OS feature, not related to Office 2003, which just gets
| turned on as necessary? If not (in my very inexperienced assessment), I
| would think it could be considered illegal because other, non-MS
| applications don't have the luxury of permanently becoming part of Windows.
| Such low-level integration could be construed as an anticompetitive
| advantage.
|
| Please fill me in if any of you are familiar with the legal stuff.
|
| Bob
|
Anonymous
May 11, 2004 9:45:23 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

On Tue, 11 May 2004 17:32:18 -0400, Bob wrote:

> Is this a built-in OS feature

XP ships with barebones ctfmon functions to support text-to-speech
(Narrator) in Accessibility Options.

--
Sharon F
MS-MVP ~ Windows XP Shell/User
Anonymous
May 12, 2004 2:13:14 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

Who gives a s**t!



--
Regards:

Richard Urban

aka Crusty (-: Old B@stard :-)

"Bob" <nobody@nowhere.com> wrote in message
news:u30cw85NEHA.2740@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
> In finally getting rid of ctfmon.exe, I discovered this article:
>
> http://support.microsoft.com/?id=823586
>
> I quote:
>
> "After you install Office and then you turn on speech recognition and
> handwriting recognition, these features become part of the operating
> system.
> You cannot remove these features, even with the Maintenance Mode of Office
> Setup."
>
> Is this a built-in OS feature, not related to Office 2003, which just gets
> turned on as necessary? If not (in my very inexperienced assessment), I
> would think it could be considered illegal because other, non-MS
> applications don't have the luxury of permanently becoming part of
> Windows.
> Such low-level integration could be construed as an anticompetitive
> advantage.
>
> Please fill me in if any of you are familiar with the legal stuff.
>
> Bob
>
!