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Benchmarks for the latest, fastest single and multi cpu...

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August 22, 2006 3:48:40 AM

Hi to all especially the tomshardware main site admins and moderators! :D 

Computer chess is becoming increasingly popular and many people have already invested in making their chess hardware and software the toughest on the planet. 8)

Here is one of the reasons why:

http://chessbase.com/newsdetail.asp?newsid=3232

More talk about chess software and hardware discusssion can also be found at:

http://www.talkchess.com

Favorite commercial softwares of many people include(not arranged according to ranking):

Rybka(which has single and multi cpu versions)which can be bought at http://rybkachess.com

Shredder/Deep Shredder(Shredder is the single cpu version, for the multi cpu version, it is called Deep Shredder, as Deep means multi cpu capable)which can be bought at www.shredderchess.com or www.chessbase.com or www.chesscentral.com

Hiarcs which can be bought at www.hiarcs.com or www.chessbase.com or www.chesscentral.com

Fritz/Deep Fritz which can be bought at www.chessbase.com and www.chesscentral.com

Junior/Deep Junior which can be bought at www.chessbase.com or www.chesscentral.com

Fruit which can be bought at www.fruitchess.com or www.chesscentral.com

Zapchess which can be bought at www.chessbase.com or www.chesscentral.com

and hydra which is not sold to anyone, but a multimillion dollar project of a group based in Abu Dhabi for chess. Their website is www.hydrachess.com

Favorite free engines/softwares in the uci format that can be tested are found at:

www.uciengines.de click on the uci engines tab.

Favorites on the free category include:

Gambitfruit, Fruit 2.1 open source, Glaurung, Pharaon, Spike, Rybka free version and Toga.

Chess programs/softwares are the most power hungry applications(especially the deep or multicpu versions)as far as speed, power, capacity and optimization of one's setup is concerned...It is the most demanding when it comes to cpu power and ram. Also, other factors that involve hardware. :idea:

In line with the statements I have given above, I strongly suggest that you include benchmarking of single and multicpu softwares for all of the benchmarks/tests that you conduct on the hardware concerned(including overclocking, cpu, ram, hard disk, motherboard, cooling system, etc...), this is to help many people buy the right hardware for the strongest softwares available. :idea:

Thank you very much. :D 
August 22, 2006 4:11:04 AM

Quote:
What??? :?: :?:


This is to benefit chess enthusiasts and people who love computer chess. :D 

Thank you. :D 
Related resources
August 22, 2006 4:21:42 AM

Quote:
But THG does benchmark CPUs.
http://www23.tomshardware.com/cpu.html

Now here's my question:
Are you affiliated with any of the chess programs or websites you just linked?


Hi Mex! :D 

Thank you for the link but i haven't found a benchmark specific for computer chess in the single cpu and multicpu category. 8)

Nope, I am not in any way affiliated with these websites; if you can see, the websites I've posted are various websites, and they function independently.

I have posted them for the sake of knowledge and ease of finding them.

I hope I didn't offend anybody by posting these links, I just want to help people who are interested in computer chess.

Please feel free to post related links if you have. Thanks.

I hope my suggestions in my first post will reach the tomshardware admin and moderators...May God bless us all! :D 
August 22, 2006 4:25:54 AM

I actually think you're on to something here. However, I couldn't find a specific chess program that actually does benchmarking. Is there a specific one that does that? Or are you just saying benchmarking chess is a good idea?

If so, please recommend which program (with link) I can use for benchmarking.

-mpjesse
August 22, 2006 5:14:59 AM

Quote:
I actually think you're on to something here. However, I couldn't find a specific chess program that actually does benchmarking. Is there a specific one that does that? Or are you just saying benchmarking chess is a good idea?

If so, please recommend which program (with link) I can use for benchmarking.

-mpjesse


I don't know how people do benchmarking. I am simple user with little knowledge about chess benchmarking, i was hoping experts here could enlighten us more. I'm sure they can benchmark chess programs because they have done so with other applications/games.

Deep fritz 8/Fritz 8 and its family of gui or related products(e.g. Deep Junior/Junior 8 or Junior/Deep Junior 9, Deep Shredder/Shredder 9, Hiarcs 9, before as I remembered) had a benchmarking module that came with it where you can configure how much ram to allocate and it will display the speed, nodes per second, and other data.

Now, the fritz 9 gui and its family of guis(e.g. Hiarcs 10, Shredder 10/Deep Shredder 10, Junior 10/Deep Junior 10, etc.) have a locked benchmarking module that you can't configure, you just run it and it does its own benchmarking based on its own(fritz 9 gui's configuration), which is not so productive if you ask me.

I believe there are other ways to benchmark chess programs and hardwares; I hope the experts here can help us more, so that we can become a wise buyer of hardware for chess.

In addition, I would like to say that benchmarking chess is a good idea; if they can benchmark games and applications, how much more with chess programs that really take on the cpu and ram power, etc. right?
August 22, 2006 5:29:51 AM

Quote:
What??? :?: :?:


This is to benefit chess enthusiasts and people who love computer chess. :D 

Thank you. :D 

Oh, I understood what you mean --- here is a link to provide all the raw data you can shake a stick at:

http://forumz.tomshardware.com/hardware/Collection-Conr...

The fastest CPU (non-server class) is the X6800 right now.

Wow, thank you for the wealth of info that you gave. :D 

Yes, people in the talkchess forum talk about the x6800 for the nonserver class being the best at present, although there are people capable of buying the fastest server class setups as well...and in line with this, do you have info on the comparison and data available for the server class as well? People who compete in chess tournaments especially in chessbase are dead serious about spending for the win, kinda like a return of investment... 8)

Thank you very much for this info. :D 

I am looking forward to an actual presentation of chess benchmarking/testing by the tomshardware forum admin; this way, people can have a more concrete basis or evidence to guide them in buying the right stuff.

Thank you for helping. :D 
August 22, 2006 6:32:26 AM

I could be wrong, but wouldn't it be too hard to benchmark a chess program? I've never heard of any chess benchmarks, and reaching the exact same results on every benchmark wouldn't be possible. Therefore, you wouldn't be able to compare processors, as one test may take 20 moves to reach check-mate, and the other may take 3, or end in stale-mate. :wink:
August 22, 2006 8:27:58 AM

Quote:
Not a problem, myself --- I would not be a good player to benchmark a chess program I typically spend 10 minutes on moves.... it would take weeks to finish a game with me (or maybe 30 minutes my chess play is rusty :)  ) :)  ....

Jack


Hehe, my chess play is pretty rusty myself. I'm a chess neophyte.

Let us see what the admin/moderators can do for us. :D 
August 22, 2006 8:36:13 AM

Quote:
I could be wrong, but wouldn't it be too hard to benchmark a chess program? I've never heard of any chess benchmarks, and reaching the exact same results on every benchmark wouldn't be possible. Therefore, you wouldn't be able to compare processors, as one test may take 20 moves to reach check-mate, and the other may take 3, or end in stale-mate. :wink:


I am optimistic enough to believe that it can be done. :D 

Yes, differences, but a rough estimate can somehow give us an idea when all the hardware used is given(that is why there should always be a margin of error, like what you do when you write a thesis). :idea:

If they can do it with other applications and games, I'm sure chess can also be done.

Please visit the links I've given, especially the talkchess forum, you will see more discussions about hardware, and people's interest in chess.

What is lacking is a hard evidence like what the tomshardware site does: Benchmarking

I hope the admin and/or moderators can really help us all. Thank you.

I look forward to seeing chess benchmarks in your next benchmarking activity. :D 
August 22, 2006 1:22:14 PM

While I am not aware of any benchmarking programs for chess per se. The core 2 X6800 would be the way to go for a single cpu setup currently. If you have the bucks, though there are various chess programs that will take advantage of multiple cpu's. Therefore you could buy a server/workstation class machine with as many cpu's as possible for the best possible outcomes.

Came across an interesting article about Deep Blue vs. Deep Blitz. Deep Blitz being a dual CPU dual core opteron box running deep fritz. While Deep Blitz does not have near the brute force capability of deep blue, it is still competitive in that it only calculates moves based on the strongest lines of play. Pretty interesting stuff.

Deep Blitz vs Deep Blue

So basically a chess benchmark really wouldn't be anything more than how many moves and outcomes a cpu could process in a given period of time.

Haven't really followed the computer chess thing since the whole Kasparov vs. Deep Blue thing.


EDIT: Duh! I didn't realize I linked to the very last page of the article. Earlier in the article it does mention that the Fritz software has its own built in benchmark which is called Fritzmark. It basically calculates the number of chess positions per second.

So yeah how about it Toms Admins? How about a Fritzmark chess benchmark in addition to your other benchmarks? I would say it would be a more worthwhile test than SuperPi afterall.

Fritzmarks
a b à CPUs
August 22, 2006 1:46:18 PM

Quote:
Hi to all especially the tomshardware main site admins and moderators! :D 

Computer chess is becoming increasingly popular and many people have already invested in making their chess hardware and software the toughest on the planet. 8)

Here is one of the reasons why:

http://chessbase.com/newsdetail.asp?newsid=3232

More talk about chess software and hardware discusssion can also be found at:

http://www.talkchess.com

Favorite commercial softwares of many people include(not arranged according to ranking):

Rybka(which has single and multi cpu versions)which can be bought at http://rybkachess.com

Shredder/Deep Shredder(Shredder is the single cpu version, for the multi cpu version, it is called Deep Shredder, as Deep means multi cpu capable)which can be bought at www.shredderchess.com or www.chessbase.com or www.chesscentral.com

Hiarcs which can be bought at www.hiarcs.com or www.chessbase.com or www.chesscentral.com

Fritz/Deep Fritz which can be bought at www.chessbase.com and www.chesscentral.com

Junior/Deep Junior which can be bought at www.chessbase.com or www.chesscentral.com

Fruit which can be bought at www.fruitchess.com or www.chesscentral.com

Zapchess which can be bought at www.chessbase.com or www.chesscentral.com

and hydra which is not sold to anyone, but a multimillion dollar project of a group based in Abu Dhabi for chess. Their website is www.hydrachess.com

Favorite free engines/softwares in the uci format that can be tested are found at:

www.uciengines.de click on the uci engines tab.

Favorites on the free category include:

Gambitfruit, Fruit 2.1 open source, Glaurung, Pharaon, Spike, Rybka free version and Toga.

Chess programs/softwares are the most power hungry applications(especially the deep or multicpu versions)as far as speed, power, capacity and optimization of one's setup is concerned...It is the most demanding when it comes to cpu power and ram. Also, other factors that involve hardware. :idea:

In line with the statements I have given above, I strongly suggest that you include benchmarking of single and multicpu softwares for all of the benchmarks/tests that you conduct on the hardware concerned(including overclocking, cpu, ram, hard disk, motherboard, cooling system, etc...), this is to help many people buy the right hardware for the strongest softwares available. :idea:

Thank you very much. :D 


Uhh.. this is SPAM.. looks like you're advertising Chess software.. which honeslty sucks.

99% of the gamers on here play REAL games.. you know games where you can do stuff you can't do in real life. ?!?!?!?!
August 22, 2006 1:56:55 PM

Chess benchmarking?? ROFL, and I thought my life was boring sometimes.

I think a cyrix 166+ is more than adequate for chess. :roll:
a b à CPUs
August 22, 2006 2:43:17 PM

Quote:
Chess benchmarking?? ROFL, and I thought my life was boring sometimes.

I think a cyrix 166+ is more than adequate for chess. :roll:


Naw man... they need to pixel shade those peons...:p  At least a bare minimum of a Core 2 Extreme x6800 clocked at 5Ghz with a Quad SLI GeForce 7950GX2 and 4x750GB Seagate 7200.10 7200RPM HD's in RAID0. Quad Sli is needed to render the players mullets with extreme precision. We all know realistically moving mullets need alot of rendering power..:p 

EDIT: I forgot to mention the need for a Creative Sound Blaster X-Fi Fatal1ty as these chess games make heavy usage of Xram and tend to fill up the entire 64MB's with 3D Positional sound giving a more realistic chess-like environment. Ohhh the excitement..:p  I almost c*m all over myself everytime I hear the announcer exclaim "checkmate" in full EAX 4.0 3D sound..:p 
August 22, 2006 2:52:11 PM

Fastest single-core CPU: Athlon 64 FX57
Fastest dual-core CPU: Core 2 Duo E6800
a b à CPUs
August 22, 2006 3:02:58 PM

Quote:
Fastest single-core CPU: Athlon 64 FX57
Fastest dual-core CPU: Core 2 Duo E6800


Don't kid yourself mate... those ain't powerful enough to play chess games.

He needs MORE POWER... *Grunt* *Grunt* *Grunt*!!!
August 22, 2006 7:29:20 PM

Quote:
Fastest single-core CPU: Athlon 64 FX57
Fastest dual-core CPU: Core 2 Duo E6800


Don't kid yourself mate... those ain't powerful enough to play chess games.

He needs MORE POWER... *Grunt* *Grunt* *Grunt*!!!


Actually there is some truth to that statement. I mean afterall, IBM had to push Deep Blue to over 200 million moves calculated/sec before it could beat Garry Kasparov. The X6800 would likely do around 3 - 4 million moves/sec in contrast. While that is certainly more than enough for the machine to whip a good human player, it becomes a whole different story if it is your machine and chess software vs. another players machine and chess program over the internet. At this point, it becomes a test of who has the superior software and hardware combination. If both are using the same software, it then becomes a test of whose machine processes the most possible moves before the time limit for that move is up.

So don't bash this guy. He actually has a decent topic here IMO.
September 1, 2006 4:05:26 PM

Quote:
Hi to all especially the tomshardware main site admins and moderators! :D 

Computer chess is becoming increasingly popular and many people have already invested in making their chess hardware and software the toughest on the planet. 8)

Here is one of the reasons why:

http://chessbase.com/newsdetail.asp?newsid=3232

More talk about chess software and hardware discusssion can also be found at:

http://www.talkchess.com

Favorite commercial softwares of many people include(not arranged according to ranking):

Rybka(which has single and multi cpu versions)which can be bought at http://rybkachess.com

Shredder/Deep Shredder(Shredder is the single cpu version, for the multi cpu version, it is called Deep Shredder, as Deep means multi cpu capable)which can be bought at www.shredderchess.com or www.chessbase.com or www.chesscentral.com

Hiarcs which can be bought at www.hiarcs.com or www.chessbase.com or www.chesscentral.com

Fritz/Deep Fritz which can be bought at www.chessbase.com and www.chesscentral.com

Junior/Deep Junior which can be bought at www.chessbase.com or www.chesscentral.com

Fruit which can be bought at www.fruitchess.com or www.chesscentral.com

Zapchess which can be bought at www.chessbase.com or www.chesscentral.com

and hydra which is not sold to anyone, but a multimillion dollar project of a group based in Abu Dhabi for chess. Their website is www.hydrachess.com

Favorite free engines/softwares in the uci format that can be tested are found at:

www.uciengines.de click on the uci engines tab.

Favorites on the free category include:

Gambitfruit, Fruit 2.1 open source, Glaurung, Pharaon, Spike, Rybka free version and Toga.

Chess programs/softwares are the most power hungry applications(especially the deep or multicpu versions)as far as speed, power, capacity and optimization of one's setup is concerned...It is the most demanding when it comes to cpu power and ram. Also, other factors that involve hardware. :idea:

In line with the statements I have given above, I strongly suggest that you include benchmarking of single and multicpu softwares for all of the benchmarks/tests that you conduct on the hardware concerned(including overclocking, cpu, ram, hard disk, motherboard, cooling system, etc...), this is to help many people buy the right hardware for the strongest softwares available. :idea:

Thank you very much. :D 


Uhh.. this is SPAM.. looks like you're advertising Chess software.. which honeslty sucks.

99% of the gamers on here play REAL games.. you know games where you can do stuff you can't do in real life. ?!?!?!?!

I never make spam messages, I hate spam.

I respect your opinion about chess, but I wished that you also respected me as well, with my preference to chess. If you had nothing good to say, to contribute to my query, you should have just held your tongue, or your fingers technically. :evil: 
September 1, 2006 4:09:30 PM

Quote:
Fastest single-core CPU: Athlon 64 FX57
Fastest dual-core CPU: Core 2 Duo E6800


Don't kid yourself mate... those ain't powerful enough to play chess games.

He needs MORE POWER... *Grunt* *Grunt* *Grunt*!!!


Actually there is some truth to that statement. I mean afterall, IBM had to push Deep Blue to over 200 million moves calculated/sec before it could beat Garry Kasparov. The X6800 would likely do around 3 - 4 million moves/sec in contrast. While that is certainly more than enough for the machine to whip a good human player, it becomes a whole different story if it is your machine and chess software vs. another players machine and chess program over the internet. At this point, it becomes a test of who has the superior software and hardware combination. If both are using the same software, it then becomes a test of whose machine processes the most possible moves before the time limit for that move is up.

So don't bash this guy. He actually has a decent topic here IMO.

Thanks friend, for the support. :D 

Here is a very delayed/long overdue news report about the 3rd freestyle chess tournament that happened in playchess.com:

http://chessbase.com/newsdetail.asp?newsid=3320
September 1, 2006 11:25:03 PM

ROFL

This is a REALLY nice and formal way of spamming.
September 2, 2006 6:02:46 AM

Well, I'm not surprised that few chess players read here.

The OP says he is a neophyte yet wants the fastest chess cpu. That a modern chess program can match Deep Blue with 1-2% of the processing power suggests that one should look first to a good chess program, not a good chess cpu.

As far as strength, even a pure brute force program running on any modern CPU will outdo a beginner at chess.

The primary market for chess benchmarking seems to be people who put their computers online to duel with other computers and the occasional human. I see little practicality outside of that for comparing modern CPUs, all of which fall into the same order of magnitude of performance in positional computation.
September 2, 2006 7:39:31 AM

Quote:
ROFL

This is a REALLY nice and formal way of spamming.


People with the likes of you posting UNINFORMATIVE, DESTRUCTIVE AND PROVOCATIVE posts in this thread are the ones that are considered spam. If you have nothing good to contribute, then please refrain from posting in this thread. If you don't like computer chess, then do not post here. I am here to ask for help and information, not to have useless arguments with people like you. :evil: 

I hope the moderators are aware of people like these persons(fsalazar90 , ElMoIsEviL) who post useless replies in this thread. 8)
September 2, 2006 7:47:52 AM

Quote:
Well, I'm not surprised that few chess players read here.

The OP says he is a neophyte yet wants the fastest chess cpu. That a modern chess program can match Deep Blue with 1-2% of the processing power suggests that one should look first to a good chess program, not a good chess cpu.

As far as strength, even a pure brute force program running on any modern CPU will outdo a beginner at chess.

The primary market for chess benchmarking seems to be people who put their computers online to duel with other computers and the occasional human. I see little practicality outside of that for comparing modern CPUs, all of which fall into the same order of magnitude of performance in positional computation.


As to chess softwares, many are available, depending on the discretion of the buyer. I have provided links on where many of these programs can be seen and bought.

I am a neophyte especially when it comes to computer stuff(benchamrking and all). Besides, if you help me here, you are not only helping me, but MILLIONS/BILLIONS of people who are interested in computer chess. Let us just respect each other.

All of you here should admit that chess is definitely one game too tough for any modern computer of today to solve, be it a home computer, a server type of computer or a even a supercomputer. I believe this is one challenge that cpu makers can help solve(by increasing speed, optimization, efficiency, etc.). 8)
!