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Linux Article - No "tear articles apart" section?

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April 2, 2004 4:46:29 AM

The Migration to Linux article was mighty M$-centric for a Linux article. What about those of us wise enough to use alternate browsers, email clients, etc to avoid the M$ security quagmire - IE this, Outlook that, yada, yada...
. And why is there no forum sections specifically for critiquing the articles - a suspicious oversight, eh?
.bh.


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More about : linux article tear articles section

April 8, 2004 2:04:53 PM

Its actually a major problem across the board. You'll never get an unbiased view at linux because microshaft owns the market. Everyone is used to the smooth way winblows works and everyone cannot help but compare it to linux.

But lets take a look at why that is instead of why it happens. Lets assume for a second that the "Tomshardware Linux Guy" is someone who received his/her education in a standard university type setting. Now check <A HREF="http://www.linuxinsider.com/perl/story/33301.html" target="_new">this story</A> out and note how Linux is mentioned in 8 IT text books only 17 times. So the only education this Linux person most likely received was limited in the linux experience.

Now imagine that you were that person and were tasked at writing an educational article about something you've barely worked with in an educational setting. You'd be screwed because you wouldn't know how to relate the stuff without referring back to what you know...aka what you were trained on...aka micorosoft. There's your explanation....blame the educational system.

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<b>It is always brave to say what everyone thinks. </b> <i>Georges Duhamel</i>

TKS
April 8, 2004 2:40:38 PM

well i never read the article on linux, so hey i can't coment on that

but comenting on your post i must say this.

I run MS WindowsXP home.......with
Mozilla 1.6
Chatzilla
Thunderbird...(those ones that come with it)
Zoom player
Winamp
Gimp 1.24
Gimp 2.0
Blender 2.32
Open Office
Python 2.2.3 (i think LOL)
JAVA (sun)
Yafray (open source raytracer)
Virtual dub
FLAC as a music format


basicly i have Winux, its damn fantastic. (only thing i use of MS's is MSN because frankly i havn't found a reasonable alternative to MSN 6.0)

i have linux installed and everything is crossoverable between the two OS's including shared HDD's

only reason i use Windows still is because Linux has no driver suport (or my hardware company has no driver suport) for my sound card (well limited suport) and frankly 2 channels running rather than 5.1 i cannot handle LOL. i am gonna make my next computer a linux exclusive computer (2005-2006 purchase date) this current one is gonna remain Winux he he he. i have paid them already so whats my advantage.

the crossover isn't a big deal IMO

Alltaken

<A HREF="http://www.mud-puddle.co.nz" target="_new">http://www.mud-puddle.co.nz&lt;/A> its where its all going on, oh and its also all going on HERE <A HREF="http://doug.mud-puddle.co.nz/gallery/" target="_new">http://doug.mud-puddle.co.nz/gallery/&lt;/A>
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April 8, 2004 9:11:14 PM

I'm using WinXP Pro, with

IE 6.0
MSN Hotmail (browser based)
MSN Messenger 6.1, mIRC
Open Office
MS Office XP (For Word and Frontpage. I don't like O.O. Writer and use Frontpage for quick HTML editing)
Java VM (Sun)
Coolplayer, get it from <A HREF="http://coolplayer.sourceforge.net" target="_new">here</A>, great highly efficient player
dvdshrink/dvd decrypter
Virtual Dub/XMPEG 5.03/OggMux
XviD
CDex
Ogg Vorbis/Monkey's audio (lossless)
CyberLink PowerDVD
Media Player Classic/Elecard MPEG-2 decoder
QuickTime Alternative/Real Alternative
MS Paint / ACD FotoCanvas

And have Knoppix installed at HD, just for having occasional fun adventure with Linux :smile:

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April 13, 2004 1:59:49 PM

Not only was it MS-centric it also blamed "Linux" in general for all problems RedHat-centric.

There are allready tons of information on the net allready covering this topic, how hard can it be to get the facts straight?

You don't have to download a lot of stuff to get the apps working in Linux! It has been reported that RPM is not the best system in the world in handling dpendencies, but that is a problem only RPM based distros share.
Debian and Gentoo (even the BSD's wich is older than any "Linux") have a long history of working dependency handling.

Even MSWindows uses should have some experiences with dependency hell, VBRun anyone? Instead of saying that Linux is harder in this respect it could be pointed out that excelent solutions to the problem has been working in the OSS world for a long time.

Also "Linux" does not look like MSWindows! KDE and a few other WM's have similarities with how MSWindows looks. But as with anything in the world of OSS you have choice. GNOME f.ex. has a more MacOS-X stylish look. My favorite and ION doesn't look like anyhting in the windows world.


just a few points from the tip of my tounge
April 14, 2004 5:29:37 AM

"RPM hell" isn't even a problem with most RPM based distributions anymore. Mandrake's got urpmi to manage that. SuSE uses YAST (or YOU) and there's also apt-get for RPM. And FWIW, even .deb based systems can have problems if the package repository is badly put together.

Back in the real world, most of the time you can just run your distro's package manager to install binary apps. It generally looks after the dependencies for you. If you need something from somewhere else, make sure the vendor provides everything you need by building a package for your distro, compiling statically, or providing a user compilable wrapper. If you download and compile random stuff to "make it work" don't be too surprised if things break. And if you do that anyway, make sure you put it in /usr/local or /opt so it stays out of your distro-provided system and can be removed easily.

Windows problems with DLL hell are largely worked around by software vendors including their DLLs and dependencies in the installer. I guess that's why a minimal app can be a 2MB download... and also why there can problems with conflicting versions being installed by different apps.

Re "Linux" looking like Windows, how long have the punters been complaining because it *didn't* look like Windows? Agreed that it can look anyway you want it to.

<i>Knock Knock, Neo</i>
April 21, 2004 9:01:43 PM

I still have windows for .NET work and Rational Rose. Its windows 2003 though, not XP.

<b><font color=red>"They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety."</font color=red><font color=blue> - Benjamin Franklin</font color=blue></b>
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