Messenger Service

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

Hi,

If I stop the Messenger Service will this mean that I cannot use the
messaging program that tells me when people are connected to the internet (I
think this is the replacement for NetMeeting but not sure)?
7 answers Last reply
More about messenger service
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    Hi,

    Do not stop the messenger service, and no it's not the same thing as
    messenger that you are using. If you are having trouble with popups, turn on
    the internal firewall.

    --
    Best of Luck,

    Rick Rogers, aka "Nutcase" - Microsoft MVP
    http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/
    Associate Expert - WindowsXP Expert Zone
    www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone
    Windows help - www.rickrogers.org

    "Newbie" <noidea@nospam.com> wrote in message
    news:uQuaUePXEHA.1652@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
    > Hi,
    >
    > If I stop the Messenger Service will this mean that I cannot use the
    > messaging program that tells me when people are connected to the internet
    (I
    > think this is the replacement for NetMeeting but not sure)?
    >
    >
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    The real question is why?
    There are good and bad reasons to stop Messenger Service.
    A bad reason is to stop Messenger Service ads.
    That may stop the ads but the real issue of an unprotected computer
    remains.
    If that is your intent, get a firewall.

    Also see:
    http://www3.telus.net/dandemar/security.htm

    --
    Jupiter Jones [MVP]
    http://www3.telus.net/dandemar/


    "Newbie" <noidea@nospam.com> wrote in message
    news:uQuaUePXEHA.1652@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
    > Hi,
    >
    > If I stop the Messenger Service will this mean that I cannot use the
    > messaging program that tells me when people are connected to the
    internet (I
    > think this is the replacement for NetMeeting but not sure)?
    >
    >
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    why shouldn't I stop the messenger service? isn't this just used for sending
    messages across a network? I only have one PC
    "Rick "Nutcase" Rogers" <rick@mvps.org> wrote in message
    news:OAlQglPXEHA.3716@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
    > Hi,
    >
    > Do not stop the messenger service, and no it's not the same thing as
    > messenger that you are using. If you are having trouble with popups, turn
    on
    > the internal firewall.
    >
    > --
    > Best of Luck,
    >
    > Rick Rogers, aka "Nutcase" - Microsoft MVP
    > http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/
    > Associate Expert - WindowsXP Expert Zone
    > www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone
    > Windows help - www.rickrogers.org
    >
    > "Newbie" <noidea@nospam.com> wrote in message
    > news:uQuaUePXEHA.1652@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
    > > Hi,
    > >
    > > If I stop the Messenger Service will this mean that I cannot use the
    > > messaging program that tells me when people are connected to the
    internet
    > (I
    > > think this is the replacement for NetMeeting but not sure)?
    > >
    > >
    >
    >
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    "Newbie" <noidea@nospam.com> wrote in message
    news:%23Do1xoPXEHA.4092@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
    > why shouldn't I stop the messenger service? isn't this just used for
    > sending
    > messages across a network? I only have one PC

    Yes stopping it is OK, and that is the purpose of Messenger Service. So, if
    you are not on a network, stop it, then disable it.
  5. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    Greetings --

    The problem is that turning off the Messenger Service does _not_
    block the wide open TCP and UDP ports that the spammers used to
    deliver the spam to the Messenger Service for display. With the
    Messenger Service disabled, those spam deliveries are still
    continuing, but they're simply not being displayed. It's like pulling
    the battery out of a noisy smoke detector to silence it, rather than
    looking for and eliminating the source of the smoke that set it off.

    The danger of this "treat the symptoms" approach has been more
    than aptly demonstrated by the advent of the W32.Blaster.Worm, the
    W32.Welchia.Worm, The W32.Sasser. Worm, and their variants. These
    worms attack PCs via some of the very same open ports that the
    Messenger Service uses. Need I mention how many hundreds of thousands
    of PCs have been infected by these worms since last August? To date,
    according to my records, I have personally responded to over 1000
    Usenet posts concerning Blaster/Welchia/Sasser infections since last
    August, and I can't possibly have seen and replied to every one that
    there's been posted in this period.

    Now, how many of those infected with Blaster/Welchia had turned
    off the Messenger Service to hide spam? I can't say, and I don't
    think anyone can. What I can say with absolutely certainty is that if
    they'd all had a properly configured firewall in place, they would
    have blocked the annoying spam _and_ been safe from a great many other
    dangers, particularly Blaster/Welchia/Sasser.

    Of course, like the Messenger Service Buffer Overrun threat, there
    is also a patch available to fix a PC's vulnerability to
    Blaster/Welchia, which was available to the general public a full
    month before the first instances of Blaster/Welchia "in the wild." If
    people learned to stay aware of computer security issues and updated
    their systems as needed, a whole lot of grief could have been avoided.
    The problem with relying upon patches, however, is that they're
    sometimes not available until _after_ the exploit has become
    wide-spread. Antivirus software suffers from this same weakness; it's
    simply not always possible to provide protection from threats that
    have not yet been developed and/or discovered. Both approaches, while
    important, are re-active in nature.

    There are several essential components to computer security: a
    knowledgeable and pro-active user, a properly configured firewall,
    reliable and up-to-date antivirus software, and the prompt repair (via
    patches, hotfixes, or service packs) of any known vulnerabilities.
    The weak link in this "equation" is, of course, the computer user.
    All too many people have bought into the various PC/software
    manufacturers marketing claims of easy computing. They believe that
    their computer should be no harder to use than a toaster oven; they
    have neither the inclination or desire to learn how to safely use
    their computer. All to few people keep their antivirus software
    current, install patches in a timely manner, or stop to really think
    about that cutesy link they're about to click. Therefore, I (and
    anyone who's thought about the matter) always recommend the use of a
    firewall. Naturally, properly configuring a firewall requires an
    investment of time and effort that most people won't give, but even
    the default settings of the firewall will offer more automatic
    protection than is currently present.

    Now, as for the Messenger Service itself, it generally doesn't
    hurt any thing to turn it off, although I never recommend doing so.
    Granted, the service is of little or no use to most home PC users
    (Although I've had uses it on my home LAN.), and turning off
    unnecessary services is part of any standard computer security
    protocol. However, I feel that the potential benefits of leaving the
    Messenger Service enabled out-weigh any as-yet-theoretical risks that
    it presents. It will indirectly let the computer user know that
    his/her firewall has failed by displaying the Messenger Service spam.
    Think of it as the canary that miners used to take down into the
    mineshafts with them. There are others, of course, who disagree with
    me on this point and advise turning off the service because it isn't
    needed; you'll have to make up your own mind here.


    Bruce Chambers
    --
    Help us help you:
    http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
    http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

    You can have peace. Or you can have freedom. Don't ever count on
    having both at once. - RAH


    "Newbie" <noidea@nospam.com> wrote in message
    news:uQuaUePXEHA.1652@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
    > Hi,
    >
    > If I stop the Messenger Service will this mean that I cannot use the
    > messaging program that tells me when people are connected to the
    internet (I
    > think this is the replacement for NetMeeting but not sure)?
    >
    >
  6. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=302089
    How to Prevent Windows Messenger from Running on a Windows XP-Based Computer

    http://www.updatexp.com/messenger_service_spam.html
    Messenger Service Spam - End It Now!


    "Tom" <no-way@not-here.com> wrote in message
    news:OL6OuEQXEHA.2844@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
    >
    > "Newbie" <noidea@nospam.com> wrote in message
    > news:%23Do1xoPXEHA.4092@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
    > > why shouldn't I stop the messenger service? isn't this just used for
    > > sending
    > > messages across a network? I only have one PC
    >
    > Yes stopping it is OK, and that is the purpose of Messenger Service. So, if
    > you are not on a network, stop it, then disable it.
    >
    >
  7. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    >"Rick "Nutcase" Rogers" <rick@mvps.org> wrote
    >> Hi,
    >> Do not stop the messenger service, and no it's not the same thing as
    >> messenger that you are using. If you are having trouble with popups, turn
    >on the internal firewall.

    "Newbie" <noidea@nospam.com> wrote:
    >why shouldn't I stop the messenger service? isn't this just used for sending
    >messages across a network? I only have one PC

    Just go ahead and turn the darned thing off. You don't need it.
    Maybe Microsoft collects info with it, I don't know. You could even
    get pop-ups through it like he says. It has nothing to do with
    Windows Messenger or MSN Messenger.

    Windows Messenger - that's another one you might want to disable if
    you use MSN Messenger anyway. Windows Messenger is always on & always
    tells people you are online if you are online, Despite un-checking
    boxes telling it not to load, and also in
    add-remove\windows-components... it still stays on. You have to do
    it another way.

    ....D.

    P.S. Recommendation - get Yahoo Messenger & run it with MSN
    Messenger. They'll work independent of each other.
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