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New York Times Interview request

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Anonymous
July 30, 2004 5:53:22 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

Hello,

I am writing an article for the New York Times back to school special coming
out in about a month.


My article is specifically about college students living in private
apartments in which one student subscribes for High speed internet service,
sets up a wireless router with WEP encryption and then splits the monthly
costs with other people in the apartment units below, above, or adjacent
units.


Please contact me if you are a student and doing something like this. By
deadline is Aug. 5.

Sandeepjun@yahoo.com

thanks
July 30, 2004 11:24:08 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

> My article is specifically about college students living in private
> apartments in which one student subscribes for High speed internet service,
> sets up a wireless router with WEP encryption and then splits the monthly
> costs with other people in the apartment units below, above, or adjacent
> units.

I am not a college student, but I think this a cool idea that is becoming very
popular, esp. with people on a tight budget like college kids and elderly folks
living in retirement centers. With reliable 802.11g connections extending out
to 300 ft., it just makes good sense to share a broadband connection with all
your neighbors and split the cost....which would come out to a few dollars a
month if there were enough people willing to join up.

Personally, I'm passing around a petition in my neighborhood asking folks if
they wanna share the cost of a WiMAX hotspot (802.16).....those will be common
in a few years across America and will offer 70 Mbps speed.

"WiMAX is the most important thing since the Internet itself."
- Intel Corporation 2004
July 31, 2004 1:38:30 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

TJM wrote:
>>My article is specifically about college students living in private
>>apartments in which one student subscribes for High speed internet service,
>>sets up a wireless router with WEP encryption and then splits the monthly
>>costs with other people in the apartment units below, above, or adjacent
>>units.
>
>
> I am not a college student, but I think this a cool idea that is becoming very
> popular, esp. with people on a tight budget like college kids and elderly folks
> living in retirement centers. With reliable 802.11g connections extending out
> to 300 ft., it just makes good sense to share a broadband connection with all
> your neighbors and split the cost....which would come out to a few dollars a
> month if there were enough people willing to join up.
>
> Personally, I'm passing around a petition in my neighborhood asking folks if
> they wanna share the cost of a WiMAX hotspot (802.16).....those will be common
> in a few years across America and will offer 70 Mbps speed.
>
> "WiMAX is the most important thing since the Internet itself."
> - Intel Corporation 2004

From your posts, it seems you don't understand the business model at
work in supplying bandwidth to the internet. The WiMax 70mbs speed will
be absolutely meaningless unless someone with extraordinarily deep
pockets wants to foot the bill for the pipe to the net. You're talking
about half the speed of an OC3 line which runs about $11,000 per month
right now. How many filthy rich neighbors do you have that want to sign
up? Until your WiMax ship comes in, I could come and supply them with
4.5mbs for a lot less if there's that much loose money running around.
Related resources
July 31, 2004 2:45:31 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

he only needs 1 or two neighbors
"Rôgêr" <abuse@your.isp.com> wrote in message
news:aOadnQM7IaCcZZfcRVn-vQ@pghconnect.com...
> TJM wrote:
> >>My article is specifically about college students living in private
> >>apartments in which one student subscribes for High speed internet
service,
> >>sets up a wireless router with WEP encryption and then splits the
monthly
> >>costs with other people in the apartment units below, above, or adjacent
> >>units.
> >
> >
> > I am not a college student, but I think this a cool idea that is
becoming very
> > popular, esp. with people on a tight budget like college kids and
elderly folks
> > living in retirement centers. With reliable 802.11g connections
extending out
> > to 300 ft., it just makes good sense to share a broadband connection
with all
> > your neighbors and split the cost....which would come out to a few
dollars a
> > month if there were enough people willing to join up.
> >
> > Personally, I'm passing around a petition in my neighborhood asking
folks if
> > they wanna share the cost of a WiMAX hotspot (802.16).....those will be
common
> > in a few years across America and will offer 70 Mbps speed.
> >
> > "WiMAX is the most important thing since the Internet itself."
> > - Intel Corporation 2004
>
> From your posts, it seems you don't understand the business model at
> work in supplying bandwidth to the internet. The WiMax 70mbs speed will
> be absolutely meaningless unless someone with extraordinarily deep
> pockets wants to foot the bill for the pipe to the net. You're talking
> about half the speed of an OC3 line which runs about $11,000 per month
> right now. How many filthy rich neighbors do you have that want to sign
> up? Until your WiMax ship comes in, I could come and supply them with
> 4.5mbs for a lot less if there's that much loose money running around.
>
July 31, 2004 6:35:48 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

> From your posts, it seems you don't understand the business model at
> work in supplying bandwidth to the internet. The WiMax 70mbs speed will
> be absolutely meaningless unless someone with extraordinarily deep
> pockets wants to foot the bill for the pipe to the net. You're talking
> about half the speed of an OC3 line which runs about $11,000 per month
> right now. How many filthy rich neighbors do you have that want to sign
> up? Until your WiMax ship comes in, I could come and supply them with
> 4.5mbs for a lot less if there's that much loose money running around.

How you going to supply all these folks with fast internet service if you have
no wire to pipe them broadband? I know lots of upper middle-class people who
dont have access to cable or DSL. WiMAX intends to provide both backhaul and
last-mile service.

WiMAX has a good chance to succeed if it can deliver 5 Mbps at even a 10-mile
NLOS radius. Portable devices are selling a lot faster than desktops, and
people want their broadband service to go with them as they run around town.

New technology is expensive when it first hits the market. I remember paying
close to $4000 for my first desktop PC in 1993 and it had a 486/DX2 CPU and a
100MB hard drive. My first cell phone in 1996 cost $50/month for 100 minutes of
analog service. WiMAX transmitters will be on the pricey side at first, but
eventually they will be everywhere just like the cell towers you see all over
the place in 2004.
July 31, 2004 6:52:46 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

TJM wrote:
>>From your posts, it seems you don't understand the business model at
>>work in supplying bandwidth to the internet. The WiMax 70mbs speed will
>>be absolutely meaningless unless someone with extraordinarily deep
>>pockets wants to foot the bill for the pipe to the net. You're talking
>>about half the speed of an OC3 line which runs about $11,000 per month
>>right now. How many filthy rich neighbors do you have that want to sign
>>up? Until your WiMax ship comes in, I could come and supply them with
>>4.5mbs for a lot less if there's that much loose money running around.
>
>
> How you going to supply all these folks with fast internet service if you have
> no wire to pipe them broadband? I know lots of upper middle-class people who
> dont have access to cable or DSL. WiMAX intends to provide both backhaul and
> last-mile service.

What I was thinking was doing what I'm doing in my home town, and that's
get a T1 line (or 3), set up some servers, set up a couple of access
points and provide internet service to customers. If you set up an
access point and spread the internet and the associated costs around,
but use cable or DSL for the pipe, then you are in danger of having your
pipe to the net yanked away from you when you are discovered.

My main point was, though, that you seem to think by using WiMax
equipment you will magically have a 70mbs connection to the net. There's
a little more to it than that.
!