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Question about FPS in Benchmarks

Last response: in Video Games
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March 24, 2007 8:55:22 PM

Ok, I am going to take as an example, the benchmarks at the main site of course.

There is still something I dont understand.

Lets say, the minimal framerate for games to run 'Ok' is 20 FPS, or maybe make it 30.
Probably the 'normal' framerate is 60 (as in, how fast games are designed to run, providing the best gameplay/graphics experience as possible).
(What is the 'normal' framerate for most games btw)

And now I see +100 FPS in the benchmarks... what does this mean? That for the purpose of running the tests, the framerate limit was disabled?
So you would basically get game characters running at 'unplayable' speeds, like going on dope?
Is that it?

Thank you :) 
March 24, 2007 11:09:39 PM

a game doesn't speed up with frame rate afaik if thats what your asking. time demos are different though and certain fps are better for jumping in quake3 engine. speed is set in the game engine same for everyone.

all displays (except CRT which is fading away) operate at 60hz, so i guess you could say 60 fps is normal (btw don't believe it when your LCD says it does more than 60 hz).
March 25, 2007 2:46:08 AM

OK thanks picture_perfect, for the reply.

I didnt know that the monitor's refresh rate was related to the framerate.

While I understand game engines are set to a given speed, Im still uncertain about my second question...
I know they are set to lets say, 60 FPS, so that in case things run "faster" in your PC you will still be able to control the characters and such in a normal way...
But then that is why I asked, what is it like to run @ lets say 150 FPS like on the benchmarks on the VGA charts in the main site... are the characters so fast that are difficult to control etc... and did they use some kind of framerate limit stopper (game commands etc) in order to get there? (150 FPS)?
Or in the end, what does it mean 150 FPS :?

Thanks :) 
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March 25, 2007 10:38:29 AM

Quote:

what is it like to run @ lets say 150 FPS like on the benchmarks on the VGA charts in the main site... are the characters so fast that are difficult to control etc... what does it mean 150 FPS :?



running speed, shooting speed ect. are not dependant on fps. they are set by a game clock which is syncronized with the computer's system clock which runs at 66 mhz. therefore all games run at the same speed (66 mhz) no matter how fast the computer (this is the reason for a game clock). on the other hand a slow computer will slow the game clock but once above this limit, the game won't be any faster and will run as intended.

if you are getting 150 fps it means you are getting more snapshots of an event than you are with 60 fps. the video card takes snapshots of events happening inside the game engine. hope that analogy makes sense. say you move from point A to point D in one second. with a slow computer (low fps) the video card captures only points A and D in one second but with a fast computer (high fps) you could see points in between A,B,C,D during that time.

Quote:


I didnt know that the monitor's refresh rate was related to the framerate.



it isn't but they can be syncronized for a better picture (look for game options "vertical sync" or "vsync").
March 26, 2007 2:06:43 AM

Quote:
running speed, shooting speed ect. are not dependant on fps. they are set by a game clock which is syncronized with the computer's system clock which runs at 66 mhz. therefore all games run at the same speed (66 mhz) no matter how fast the computer (this is the reason for a game clock).

Man you totally own. And I suck pretty hard, because I should have known this :lol:  A long time ago I tried to make simple homebrew games, and I did some, and I remember making this clock-sync thing... now I grew up thinking this was FPS :roll: :lol: 

Quote:

if you are getting 150 fps it means you are getting more snapshots of an event than you are with 60 fps. the video card takes snapshots of events happening inside the game engine. hope that analogy makes sense.

Ok, since you seem like a nice guy willing to help the newbies... lets see if I got that analogy right.
If I take lets say, a "movie" of the videogame... where each frame in the game is a picture in the movie (I know, stupid analogy because of video format's own "framerate" etc), if Im running the game @ 20 FPS.. this means Ill get a "jumpy" video with a lot of "dropped" frames.
If I run it @ 60 FPS ("normal" rate), then I get a smooth video.
If I run it @ 200 FPS I still get a smooth video but probably with a lot of "discardable" information, since I could get a good video with the 60 FPS.

Am I right here then? :) 

And thank you very much again! :D 
March 27, 2007 7:29:11 AM

i would say that's accurate from what little i know :)  60 fps looks the same as 120 fps to me. on the other hand pro gamers prefer very high fps/hertz because of the "extraneous" screen updates. sounds like you are into game development just wondered why you were asking.
March 28, 2007 5:21:07 AM

Yes you could say I am into it :) 

Ok thanks again for your answer ;) 
March 28, 2007 6:31:42 AM

Quote:
a game doesn't speed up with frame rate afaik if thats what your asking.

As always there are exceptions to the rule, those being games like CNC. You set the game speed by the fps cap, which is usually 30. If you have a slow pc znd you constantly run under 30, the game doesnt run jerky per se, its just slower.
March 28, 2007 7:43:11 AM

yep maybe someone has a more accurate answer. btw game development sure would be fun. too bad competition in the field turned me off when i was considering school. i suppose its even worse now. looks like a lot of hard work fo' sho.
March 28, 2007 8:24:11 AM

Its ok if you work for EA, they monopolize anyway. But do you really want to be part of dodgy game development? Support small businesses!
!