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Verizon voice mail ringer question

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Anonymous
May 8, 2004 4:15:09 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

I just bought my first cell phone, the LG VX4500. I activated the Verizon
voice mail but can't figure out how to control the number of rings before
voice mail picks up the call. Also, the invoice lists the features and
included is "voice mail access charge". What exactly does that mean? Is
there a one time activation charge or will I be billed every time I access
voice mail?
Anonymous
May 8, 2004 12:40:02 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

1. No, you cannot control the number of rings as far as I know. Maybe
give customer service a call and ask them. But as far as I know, you
canot control it. I think for my phone its 6 or 7 rings when the phone
is on, and a caller goes straight to voice mail if the phone is off.

2. You will be charged airtime to access voice mail from your phone.
This will show on your statement as a call to (860) 000-0000. You can
always access it from a landline phone for free (of course regular
landline charges apply) by dialing the number of your cell phone (of
course turn your phone off first, otherwise it will ring and ring).
You can check voice mail during off peak hours and not be charged
against your peak minutes (assuming you're on America's Choice or
other plan where you get a lot of off peak minutes).

At one time there were "back door" numbers that you could call and use
Mobile to Mobile (now called "In Network") minutes. Most of these are
no longer in use, but a few may still be in use depending on the
market (as these are market dependent). I'm sure others on here will
chime in on this topic :-)

Also, when in a non-Verizon area and checking yoru voicemail, you MUST
dial your cell phone number instead of *86. Some non-Verizon partners
such as Alltel *may* allow you to use *86 but it is not guaranteed.

Hope this helps.

Dave

On Sat, 8 May 2004 00:15:09 -0400, "Carol J"
<caroljj2nospam@comcast.net> wrote:

>I just bought my first cell phone, the LG VX4500. I activated the Verizon
>voice mail but can't figure out how to control the number of rings before
>voice mail picks up the call. Also, the invoice lists the features and
>included is "voice mail access charge". What exactly does that mean? Is
>there a one time activation charge or will I be billed every time I access
>voice mail?
>
May 9, 2004 9:11:57 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

> At one time there were "back door" numbers that you could call and use
> Mobile to Mobile (now called "In Network") minutes. Most of these are
> no longer in use, but a few may still be in use depending on the
> market (as these are market dependent). I'm sure others on here will
> chime in on this topic :-)
>

In the Charlotte, NC market, VZW re-assigned the old back door number to an
actual cell phone. I'd hate to be the poor bastard who got that number.

-Stan
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Anonymous
May 14, 2004 8:53:21 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

"Diamond Dave" <dmine45.NOSPAM@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:8qkp90t0r8afrg2toirepi9mnils0alh4k@4ax.com...

> At one time there were "back door" numbers that you could call and use
> Mobile to Mobile (now called "In Network") minutes. Most of these are
> no longer in use, but a few may still be in use depending on the
> market (as these are market dependent). I'm sure others on here will
> chime in on this topic :-)

The back door numbers in my area still work. But I've always used them from
a landline. It never occurred to me that by using the backdoor numbers that
I'd be charged MTM rather than peak minutes. I thought that these were
landline numbers.

See http://www.bridog.net/cellular/voicemail.txt for a list of numbers.

Another useful web site is: http://members.dandy.net/~czg/search.html

This will let you find out which carrier someone is on, which tells you if
you're using off-peak or peak. Well, it works unless the person has ported
their number to another carrier, anyway! I guess this is one drawback to
LNP. I tried using it on a co-worker, and guessed AT&T, but she had ported
to T-Mobile.
Anonymous
May 14, 2004 9:55:34 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

In article <5hYoc.19660$Hs1.6104@newsread2.news.pas.earthlink.net>,
Steven M. Scharf <scharf.steven@linkearth.net> wrote:
>"Diamond Dave" <dmine45.NOSPAM@yahoo.com> wrote in message
>news:8qkp90t0r8afrg2toirepi9mnils0alh4k@4ax.com...
>
>> At one time there were "back door" numbers that you could call and use
>> Mobile to Mobile (now called "In Network") minutes. Most of these are
>> no longer in use, but a few may still be in use depending on the
>> market (as these are market dependent). I'm sure others on here will
>> chime in on this topic :-)
>
>The back door numbers in my area still work. But I've always used them from
>a landline. It never occurred to me that by using the backdoor numbers that
>I'd be charged MTM rather than peak minutes. I thought that these were
>landline numbers.

The backdoor number looks like any other VZW number (i.e., same prefix
as other VZW numbers). But in the VZW network, it is routed to the VM
system, rather than going to a phone.

And they still work in the San Francisco Bay area.
Anonymous
May 14, 2004 10:51:07 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

On 14 May 2004 05:55:34 GMT, hoch@exemplary.invalid (CharlesH) wrote:

>>The back door numbers in my area still work. But I've always used them from
>>a landline. It never occurred to me that by using the backdoor numbers that
>>I'd be charged MTM rather than peak minutes. I thought that these were
>>landline numbers.
>
>The backdoor number looks like any other VZW number (i.e., same prefix
>as other VZW numbers). But in the VZW network, it is routed to the VM
>system, rather than going to a phone.
>
>And they still work in the San Francisco Bay area.

Same for Richmond, VA area.

Dave
!