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Hacking for free games! FTW or FTL?

Last response: in Video Games
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Do you agree with hacking games to get them for free?

Total: 21 votes

  • Yes not that i do it (shifty eyes)
  • 43 %
  • Yes but i dont know how
  • 20 %
  • No its wrong and take money away from the makers
  • 39 %
April 15, 2007 12:42:24 PM

What's your opinion? Despite hacking the games mean no online play people still use hamachi and VPN the games.

But yer - post here
April 16, 2007 10:40:31 PM

yes, but (theres always a but) I usually only do it to see if the game is worth spending money on. If the game ends up being good, I will almost always buy it.

However back in my poorer college days that wasn't always the case.

All in all, even after buying games I will usually crack them anyway because having to put the CD back in every time I switch what I am playing is just archaic and stupid. I hate DRM. Also some DRM software makes the game unplayable until cracked. Its just annoying to pay $40 - $50 for something and then have to do something technically illegal to just be able to make use of it.

Have I mentioned how much I hate DRM? ... Yeah.
April 17, 2007 10:51:49 AM

Quote:
yes, but (theres always a but) I usually only do it to see if the game is worth spending money on. If the game ends up being good, I will almost always buy it.

However back in my poorer college days that wasn't always the case.

All in all, even after buying games I will usually crack them anyway because having to put the CD back in every time I switch what I am playing is just archaic and stupid. I hate DRM. Also some DRM software makes the game unplayable until cracked. Its just annoying to pay $40 - $50 for something and then have to do something technically illegal to just be able to make use of it.

Have I mentioned how much I hate DRM? ... Yeah.


ditto^^

the only games i wont buy are the ones using starforce(?), why buy a game with protection thats gonna screw your pc when you can just hack it and not hve any trouble at all...

pay = broke pc
dont pay = no hassles.

generally i will buy a game if i like it, i normally delete the ones i dont like after about 2days.
Related resources
April 19, 2007 4:00:00 PM

I absolutely download games, its and essential part of my quality control process. I am sick of buying crappy games, and rewarding developers for their neglegence with money. I paid for Black and White 2 and Doom 3, thinking they were going to be amazing... thats ~140 bucks i sure wish i had back. I will ALWAYS buy a game i think deserves it, especially from smaller companies, (ie not EA) or for franchises i really want to see succeed.

Plus, sometimes its hard to find cracked execuables without the whole game attached, and if I cant play it through my quicklaunch bar, then i aint gonna bother.
April 19, 2007 6:42:27 PM

You guys know that demos exist? And also review sites?

Downloading games even to try it out for 1-2 days to see if its good or not is still illegal. At the same time you are encouraging others to download them especially if you use bittorrent because you are uploading the games to others.
April 19, 2007 7:01:08 PM

Quote:
You guys know that demos exist? And also review sites?

Downloading games even to try it out for 1-2 days to see if its good or not is still illegal. At the same time you are encouraging others to download them especially if you use bittorrent because you are uploading the games to others.


I am aware that these are available, but I find I disagree with reviews more often than I agree with them and demos are often misleading.

One prime example is Evil Genius. The demo for that game was fun and interesting. I was excited about that game and bought it the day it came out. Then I found out that after the intro level that was in the demo, the game became unmanagable and frustrating. All fun was lost to the absurd level of micromanagement you were forced into. This is something that I would have been spared had I downloaded the full game and given it a test drive before buying.

There have been other games where demos were lackluster, but the game ended up being much better as well.

On top of that is the fact that I will probably get the crack or download the game even after buying it to avoid the DRM so doing so before buying the game isn't expending extra effort AND it gives me a better idea of how the game plays out before I invest any money in it.

If companies did not use DRM software that forces me to break the law to use the product, then I probably would never have started doing things this way, but they have made it so that there is less hassle with cracking the software than using it as intended.
April 19, 2007 7:17:01 PM

Using a patch to prevent cd-check is legal. Downloading a game is not.
April 19, 2007 8:32:59 PM

oh really.... So... praytell, what laws are at play?

Since you seem hell bent on playing lawyer how about backing up your statements.

Can you quote the part of the DMCA that allows you to bypass protection methods used in software? Can you provide instances where a court upheld the user's right to disregard the EULA that came with the software?

If so I would love to have that info but I have the distinct feeling that you are talking out of your butt.

I am not going to sit here and try to make excuses for breaking the law, but I am not going to condemn people for such things either.

If developers start making games with no DRM, then I will buy them without looking for cracks/full downloads first. In fact I have in the cases of Warhammer 40,000 Dawn of War: Dark Crusade and Galactic Civilizations II. Any time I hear of a game that has no DRM or CD checks, if it sounds like I would even remotely enjoy it, I buy it straight away. Why? Because if nothing else I am investing in a trend that reduce my overall hassle in the future. Without the hassle I would probably never look at a warez site ever again.
April 20, 2007 5:19:37 AM

Quote:
Using a patch to prevent cd-check is legal. Downloading a game is not.


What the hell are you talking about. One is no more legal than the other. In Canada (where I live) there is no law against downloading anything as far as I know. The only governing force that makes me pay for any software is my own sense of morality :roll:

Quote:
In fact I have in the cases of Warhammer 40,000 Dawn of War: Dark Crusade and Galactic Civilizations II.


I have also purchased both of these games, pretty much for the same reason. I also have about 50 other games in cases collecting dust.

Its not a money thing, I don't mind paying... I just dont want to support garbage. If I buy a crappy game that I thought was going to be good, the company fooled me with misleading information that lead me to believe their product was better then it actually was. In most areas of one's life, this is the accepted norm. Misinformation falsely represents products which the consumer has to analyze, or trust reviewers as their proxy. This is one area in my life where I have control, and in any country besides the US, land of lawsuits, there is nothing technically legally wrong with it.
April 20, 2007 11:42:02 AM

Quote:
Using a patch to prevent cd-check is legal. Downloading a game is not.


What the hell are you talking about. One is no more legal than the other. In Canada (where I live) there is no law against downloading anything as far as I know. The only governing force that makes me pay for any software is my own sense of morality :roll:


There is a law about owning copywrited material. There is no law to download music or movies because it is just like watching them on tv. There is a law that you can't own them and share them though.

There is no law about patching the software you own legally.


Anyways, use your sense.. If you feel good playing games and not paying for them.. Then good for you. I think that even if you download a game and play it and don't end up buying it because you don't like, the developper should get some kind of money for it. Maybe you played it for an hour or two only but you played it. There is video store where you can rent games if you really want to try them out before. There is not a lot of them for computer games but there is some.
April 20, 2007 1:40:25 PM

it is against the law to patch a game.. its in the EULA of every game out there, you kno that big bit of writing your meant to read before you install the game.
in there it states that you are not allowed to change the game exe file.

anyway im with the guy above, heres another demo that was misleading the FEAR demo, was set out completly different to the actual game.
April 22, 2007 6:13:05 PM

Quote:
Anyways, use your sense.. If you feel good playing games and not paying for them.. Then good for you. I think that even if you download a game and play it and don't end up buying it because you don't like, the developper should get some kind of money for it.


Ouch, moral high ground.. that hurts.

I feel much worse being a sucker, which is what you are when you buy non-refundable software that is total garbage. I can't think of a software company out there that NEEDS my money, which to me mitigates some of the harm.

While I don't condone any of it, there are degrees of stealing and degrees of wrong. ie Robin Hood :p  I like to think of it as more of a test drive.
April 23, 2007 1:18:23 PM

Q: Who are you hurting when you download a game to see if it's any good?

A: The companies that make rubbish games that you cant take back for a refund when you find out there goods are substandard.

Laws are meant to be bent aren’t they, since when was anything black and white?

Oh check out this site too:

Quote:
The Business Software Alliance (BSA) responded to one of our inquiries saying, illegal fixes are programs that contain material (eg: program code etc.) from the commercial copyrighted product and this material is used for creating the fix. But on MegaGames, as far as we know, we only have fixes that change the byte patterns etc. of the product and do not use any material from the commercial copyrighted product. For a fix to be declared illegal, this "require the crack [fix] programmer to disassemble the program code and sometimes use part of that code to make the crack [fix]." (BSA). Our Game Fixes sections also acts as a library displaying many different individuals exploits with games. Therefore the fixes on MegaGames are fully legal according to the US Digital Millennium Act.

http://www.megagames.com/read.htm
April 24, 2007 8:06:15 AM

People, people, people.

This could be such a more interesting topic if you just put your heart into it. Let's first start of with basics then: we all know that hacking games, or downloading them, is illegal. You are infringing on copyright.

Everybody understands that when they want to get in to the movie theatre to see a movie, that they have to pay for it, and that they will not get their money back if the movie sucks beyond imagination. So why do people insist that they feel they have the right to try out a game? "If I like it, I'll buy it" sure... statistics show otherwise and that's very understandable. How to compete when you can get it for free elsewhere with a virtual chance of nil to ever get caught for it?

If everybody was so well behaved, DRM would not exist, it would certainly not be applied to games. I agree with those who hate DRM, that it is not the answer to the problem, but as noone yet has the real answer, other than switching over to the MMO business model, or a model like Steam, you cannot blame the industry for trying. Either that, or you should first blame all those people that are not that well behaved as you, as you always buy the games you like... newsflash: even if a company made a game that seriously sucks, they still deserve to get paid for it because you played it. It may have been the last time you ever got a game from them but that is just capiltalism at work.

There's all kinds of things that might work instead of DRM, but in my mind the best will be if it is something that will invoke social control, not just through law enforcement by authorities.

Just remember, if normal market mechanisms would function, this would much faster weed out the crap games coming out than what is going on now with out of control piracy of software, and to be fair, it is not just consumers that are to blame. The industry should be willing to find price points that do justice to the amounf of effort they put into creating a game, and if current prices reflect what they can do at the moment, then they should just put equal effort into becoming more efficient instead of only investing in DRM, just like with any normal industry.
April 24, 2007 8:34:37 AM

The difference is if I go to the cinema it costs me £5 plus who is ever with me, if I buy a game it costs me up to £40 and becomes un-returnable as soon as I open the seal. The UK is meant to have a statutory seven-day cooling off period but places like GAME seem to think this is not the case with PC games (this is a recent thing). All products in the UK if purchased and found not to be up to expectations should be able to be returned if in the condition it was purchased in within seven-days. A security seal should not affect this statutory right but game will argue till blue in the face that it is there policy not to take PC game returns.

Buying online also has the same effect with it becoming more expensive than it’s worth to return the game than it’s worth and leaves you in a catch twenty-two situation. Thing is I would not have a problem if games did not cost so much, and just treat them like DVD’s that you spend £10 watch them once then just chuck them in a cupboard till you either give it to someone or throw it out a few years down the line.

You can’t even rent PC games to see what there like, at least consoles have this luxury. All you can do with a PC game is trust that the review sites have not been paid off to give a stupidly good review or that the demo (if there is one) is true to the actual game.

PC gamers are in a bind, and while the techniques for testing out games is seen as illegal by the eyes of the all being and always correct and perfectly just law. We are left with little choice, cant help that people abuse this system. Although I would place money that the people who do abuse this system are teenagers of thirteen or not even who cannot buy such games as they don’t get enough pocket money to buy them or cant buy them in the first place as they are not old enough. Would they be loosing the developers money in the first place?
April 24, 2007 9:29:37 AM

You don't have to pay £40, you can always find cheaper places than that, at least in my experience, or else wait till the hype wears off. It is perfectly understandable/reasonable, to charge early adaptors premium.

That whole returning thing with games is, obviously, because it is so easy to copy them and then return it and still play it. Indeed a catch 22.

I don't think games cost that much if you really play them from start to finish, if you plot that say enjoyable time spent vs costs, compared to movies. Books are definitely cheaper on the average (or maybe I'm just a slow reader).

Quote:

Although I would place money that the people who do abuse this system are teenagers of thirteen or not even who cannot buy such games as they don’t get enough pocket money to buy them or cant buy them in the first place as they are not old enough. Would they be loosing the developers money in the first place?


Just look at the revenues they make of WoW, it is a safe bet that quite a lot of money is lost, regardless whether 13 year olds buy the game themselves or whether someone else buys it for them. I think it is safe to say that the average game player is older than 13 nowadays...

Im not too sure the money argument you are using flies. Would you be prepared to buy all games, if you get limited refund when you return it after a week? In effect you will only be charged up to £10 if you return it before that time?

If you see what people are prepared to pay for food, it is staggering and also there you will not get a refund if it was a bad experience.
April 24, 2007 5:38:10 PM

Once again though, food is cheaper per plate. SOME people will pay over $15 for a meal (which I consider on the high end of pricey as it is) but that is generally for restaurants that are considered to be truly great.

Meals costing upwards of $50-$60 (video game prices in the States) are pretty much the best of the best.

Even crappy video games tend to bottom out in starting price at around $30 and the vast majority are $50.

That is quite a bit of money to piss away on a game that fails utterly to live up to expectations. Generally when I decide I don't like a game I have played it no more than 2 hours. $50 for 2 hours is a terrible ratio.

Also returning games is a hassle. Generally to return anything involves standing in a line for at least 20 minutes, sometimes up to 2 hours depending on the day, then another minimum of 10 minutes of jumping through hoops and waiting for managers and such. Then there is the transit time to and from the store.

Again I am not making excuses why I think it should be legal, just giving the reasons why I do it the way I do it.

Also, the more effort it takes to crack a game, the less likely I am to buy it. And if it has Starforce... forget it.
April 24, 2007 7:26:53 PM

Quote:
Meals costing upwards of $50-$60 (video game prices in the States) are pretty much the best of the best.


My meal comment probably had too much of a european perspective on it. I'm sure you also have places like that in the states but in Europe the high end of dining is hundreds of dollars/euros. I have to admit that on the occasions where I shelved out more than a 100 euro per person I've seldomly been disappointed, but that is what capitalism brings, value for money. A restaurant charging those kind of prices would simply not survive for even a month without serving the best of quality food.

As there is quite a price range for games as well, once they've been released for a while, i'm simply not convinced by people who object to the price of games. Everything is too much if you compare it to nothing.
April 24, 2007 7:43:25 PM

I'll lay it all out for you.

Reason 1: Hassle. It takes less hassle to download and crack a game than it does to drive to the store, buy the game, drive back, and THEN crack it.

Reason 2: Crap. I don't want to encourage crap peddlers. If the game sucks I do not want to help fund their next abortion of good taste. And most games are crap.

Reason 3: Money. I don't want to waste my video game budget buying crap titles when that money would be better spent on good ones. I don't want to piss away $50 for a game that sounded promising but ended up lying.

It isn't just one or two of these reasons, but all three. And frequently if I am at a games store anyway I will impulse buy a game and frequently regret it. This is because I have reduced the hassle objection by already being there. Also games that come out at a lower cost new (like $30 to $40) I will often buy first because I have reduced the Money objection. Finally games that are sequels to games I already love I will often buy straight away because I have a reasonable assurance that it bypasses the Crap objection.

You can attack any one of these three objections and find it lacking pretty easily, but that is only a portion of the equation.

Also if a game I was particularly interested came out on Steam I probably wouldn't hesitate to buy it because of the reduction of hassle. I have done so with Stardock in the past.
April 24, 2007 7:55:00 PM

For the record, I am firmly against the illegal downloading of any content, including games. I understand the points of people who do download games. In fact, Aaron and I debated this issue a while back -- and I won the argument, of course.
http://www.twitchguru.com/2006/03/08/a_multiplayer_mele...

Caffudled asked who is hurt by gamers downloading games to see if they're any good. Well, here's the thing -- I believe Info is sincere when he writes tha he almost always buys a legit copy of the game after trying a download out. But let's all be honest here: do we honestly think people like Info are the exception or the rule? Using a download for an extended demo to see if you like the game is one thing, but I highly doubt most gamers are going out to EB Games and buying a $50 version of the same game they just downloaded on their hard drive. If we agree that Info's the exception -- and we all should agree on that -- then it's easy to see the damage that's caused by illegal downloading. Gamers download games instead of paying for them, the sales for PC gams go down. We may think to ourselves, hey, EA and THQ and Vivendi have plenty of money, what's the harm?

But we forget about the developers. It costs a sh*tload of money to make a game these days and it takes forever, too. So if a game developer makes a solid title but it doesn't sell, they may not ever get another chance. They may close up shop or get bought out by a big publisher. This leads to less independent developers and more DRM. It's just like the music business. The big record companies will always find a way to make money and squeeze the artist, so downloading is going to hurt the musicians the most.

Which reminds me, I wrote this back in the day and it was kind of amusing to go back and read it again:
http://www.crn.com/it-channel/18813874?queryText=Napste...
April 25, 2007 10:46:43 AM

While I must admit that downloading and keeping games that you like is wrong and that I believe that the mass majority of users are downloading games and keeping them. Games above all other things are being least hurt by piracy than any other format. When you download a movie and watch it you have pretty much got the whole experience the product has to offer bar a few special features that no one ever watches anyway. Same with music, you download a song and what are you missing out on? The life story on the back of the front cover, not really going to end your life is it.

But when it comes to games, most people will know if any downloaded game has online features, that there is a more than likely chance of that game being unusable in that respect. I must admit that I am like info where I do download most of my games when they are first available on the Internet. But if I did not go out and buy the ones I would like I would be missing out on so much. Recent games I have downloaded then purchased are games like ArmA and Stalker, which have provide greatly enjoyable experiences.

In reply to what has been said about steam, I agree that for some reason I have greatly reduced impulse to download games for that system off the Internet. It seams that I will almost brainlessly part with my card details because it is far less hassle to download a game over steam than it would be to either go out and buy or download such content.

Just to note something here, in rip-off Britain where I live games for the 360 can cost £50, which at the current exchange rates is $105 and PC games like Battle Field 2 and ArmA cost me £40, which is about $84. That fact alone kinda helps when it comes to the impulse of downloading over buying. Oh and I taken my girl friend to a nice Chinese place when I was down in London the other day, the service was crap and it cost me what would be $103 for the two of us (that’s not expensive).

Maybe you should have a debate on why Britain gets ripped off for digital software, a product that has no more costs involved for producing here than it does over in the states. I mean why is Windows Vista the same price in dollars as it is in pounds when we get nearly 2.1 USD to a single British pound at the moment.
May 8, 2007 1:57:05 PM

Has anyone ever used any sites for free games that are of the older type. I ran across this site and was wondering if anyone else has used it. Just looking for advice so I dont waste my time.


http://free-game-downloads.mosw.com/


Trager
May 8, 2007 5:35:18 PM

you mean abandonware sites or freeware sites?

Abandonware is the concept that after video game manufacturers go out of business or quit manufacturing/selling a particular game, that the game in question becomes public domain and free game.

There is still quite a bit of controversy over the explicit legality of abandonware as a concept, but since these companies are not around or not profiting from that IP anymore, generally such sites are left alone.

Freeware is where the game manufacturer produced the game and either provided it for free from day one, or provided it as a free download once it was no longer profitable. The former are far more common than the latter but both exist. I'm not familiar with any sites that have gathered links/downloads for completely freeware games, but many freeware/shareware games can be found on sites like tucows and download.com
May 9, 2007 12:02:48 PM

I've taken a crap game back to Game and got a refund before now.
May 9, 2007 12:06:00 PM

Cafuddled - I agree that we get ripped off in Britain. This is why I now purchase all my games/CDs/DVDs from Play.com or cd-wow. Vote with your feet!
May 9, 2007 12:09:59 PM

Quote:
If you see what people are prepared to pay for food, it is staggering and also there you will not get a refund if it was a bad experience.

You are quite entitled to complain in a restaurant, and if it's a half-decent establishment they won't charge you if you have a legit complaint.
May 10, 2007 1:39:57 PM

Quote:
If you see what people are prepared to pay for food, it is staggering and also there you will not get a refund if it was a bad experience.

You are quite entitled to complain in a restaurant, and if it's a half-decent establishment they won't charge you if you have a legit complaint.

Obviously if the provider waives his/her rights on compensation, that is fine. It is something else to take a unilateral course of action without agreement from the provider.

As far as I am concerned everyone is quite entitled to complain about bad software or bad computer games. That is quite different from stealing someone's property (infringement on copy rights for the nut pickers).
May 10, 2007 4:51:39 PM

This is why they come and ask you if the meal is OK at even the cheapest restaurants where they don't give a toss about service - it's a legal thing. Once you say "yes, it's lovely thanks", you commit yourself to paying for the meal in full.

Otherwise, you are entitled to only pay what you think the meal was worth (little-known and obscure British legal thingy).


They could try a similar thing with games - you buy the game at a low price/free, but it comes with a limited life. After a certain amount of time/use, you can either pay for unlimited use, or say "no thanks" and the game ceases to function.
This would;
a. Do away with the need for seperate demos
b. Call the bluff of people who claim they only pirate to "test" games.
May 10, 2007 5:52:30 PM

Quote:
They could try a similar thing with games - you buy the game at a low price/free, but it comes with a limited life. After a certain amount of time/use, you can either pay for unlimited use, or say "no thanks" and the game ceases to function.
This would;
a. Do away with the need for seperate demos
b. Call the bluff of people who claim they only pirate to "test" games.


They have those, its called shareware, and it is older than the internet.
Also, I have used shareware AND purchased the games several times before. In some ways I like this model and in others I find it annoying depending on how they implement it.

The big game companies usually don't do this though, and the reason is that they produce mostly crap, they know they produce mostly crap, and they want to entice you into buying the crap anyway with deceptive demos and "paid for" reviews.
May 11, 2007 7:18:12 AM

Quote:
This is why they come and ask you if the meal is OK at even the cheapest restaurants where they don't give a toss about service - it's a legal thing. Once you say "yes, it's lovely thanks", you commit yourself to paying for the meal in full.

Otherwise, you are entitled to only pay what you think the meal was worth (little-known and obscure British legal thingy).


It being obscure and British (in random order) should make you realize you cannot generalize it to behavior of people around the globe (regarding eating habits or the playing of computer games) :roll:
May 11, 2007 7:21:34 AM

Quote:
They have those, its called shareware, and it is older than the internet.


Actually it's about as old as the internet. Not the concept but the actual dubbing of the term and general usage.

Quote:
The big game companies usually don't do this though, and the reason is that they produce mostly crap, they know they produce mostly crap, and they want to entice you into buying the crap anyway with deceptive demos and "paid for" reviews.


That's why these companies don't worry about people like you. They worry about the mindless masses that do like the crap but still don't pay for it.
May 11, 2007 2:48:49 PM

Quote:
That's why these companies don't worry about people like you. They worry about the mindless masses that do like the crap but still don't pay for it.
With that in mind then, the only companies that worry about people not paying for there goods are the ones that are trying to scam the common folk out of there good hard earned cash because they do not know any better. So why should we have a debate on game publishes (who are them self cheating the public) complaining about it when they get cheated?
May 11, 2007 5:49:54 PM

Quote:
They have those, its called shareware, and it is older than the internet.


Actually it's about as old as the internet. Not the concept but the actual dubbing of the term and general usage.

I remember Flagg's Floppies. They had these big racks in a few stores and you could get the games for next to nothing, but they were just shareware. You then had to give them money for the full game. They were around in the early 90's, which while technically not older than the internet, were certainly around before the internet became popular and long before I ever got on it.

on a side note, I find it strange and sort of weird that I could only find 3 references to Flagg's Floppies on google and nothing in Wikipedia.

Quote:

The big game companies usually don't do this though, and the reason is that they produce mostly crap, they know they produce mostly crap, and they want to entice you into buying the crap anyway with deceptive demos and "paid for" reviews.


That's why these companies don't worry about people like you. They worry about the mindless masses that do like the crap but still don't pay for it.

They might not worry about me, but I'm the type of person they hurt with their stupid DRM. DRM does next to nothing to stop or even significantly slow down piracy. It does however cause programs to not work on legitimate customers' systems.

Honestly, I seriously doubt that enough people are pirating their software that would even have the money to pay for it otherwise to even put a dent in their profits. Hell just look at how many people have answered that they don't know how to crack software in the poll, and these are people who are tech savvy enough to chat on a hardware forum.
May 15, 2007 9:37:47 AM

Quote:
great games
Steady :roll:
May 16, 2007 12:34:35 AM

Quote:
great games
Steady :roll:
Well said :trophy:

I have tried a few games on that list (Silkroad/Knight/Mu online): some were decent, but none were great (if you compare them to games you can actually pick up from the store). After I completed my current rig I actually played Silkroad for about 2 weeks until I bought some great games from the store.

In regards to hacking for free games, I can see why some may chose to do that. I agree with infornography42 that I don't want to waste my cash for terrible games (although I have to admit I have in the past). I don't even want to play free games that are terrible since I can afford to pay for good ones.

New games are not the only ones that get hacked. Although some of the older games have become abondonware, some popular titles are still protected. It is easier to have many games running off a single PC rather than off different systems and cartridges. What do the posters in this forum think about hacking old console games to run off emulators on the PC?
May 16, 2007 12:52:06 AM

ok so they may not be the greatest but i currently play silkroads and think it's pretty comparable to the bigger pay to play games.

I once got a hacked version of Galactic Civilization II so i could play it and later bought it after getting addicted to it.

as far as emulators go i support those 110%
May 16, 2007 1:59:34 AM

emulators used to be used for pretty obvious abandonware, but that has become a bit of a sticky pickle with the advent of live arcade and the Wii Virtual Console.

They are slowly ressurecting some of the really good old console games and you will have a viable option to pay for them and play them again.

I think I will support the philosophy of emulating games that are not yet available on those services, but buying them if you want to keep playing them once they do become available. *shrug* Not something I've put a considerable amount of thought into though since I STILL HAVEN'T FOUND A WII!
May 16, 2007 2:06:42 AM

i see your in dallas... so am i. Try microcenter on North Central Expy (75 hwy) up in richardson. they have all the consoles in stock as far as i know.
May 16, 2007 5:28:14 PM

I'll have to check that out whenever I scrape some money together.
!