HP Laptop - Reliable?

Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

Hi,

This is my first trip to this ng.

I've been looking at laptops for my daugher who's going to college. I've
always owned wintel type desktops by Gateway (never again), Dell, and
homebuilt. I'm not familiar with HP products, except their laser
printers.

I was comparing Toshiba, Dell, Compaq, and HP laptops tonight at Circuit
City. I'm in the $1500 and less price range. Can anyone tell me, what's
your opinion of the reliability of HP laptops, primarily with Intel
processors? Also, is there a lot proprietary hardware/software (esp.
bios) that would cause me to pull my hair out if I ever had to
repartition?


Thanks much,
Bruce
19 answers Last reply
More about laptop reliable
  1. Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    On Tue, 04 May 2004 05:53:01 GMT
    Bruce <parcxman@netscape.net> wrote:

    >
    > I was comparing Toshiba, Dell, Compaq, and HP laptops tonight at Circuit
    > City. I'm in the $1500 and less price range. Can anyone tell me,
    > what's your opinion of the reliability of HP laptops, primarily with
    > Intel processors? Also, is there a lot proprietary hardware/software
    > (esp. bios) that would cause me to pull my hair out if I ever had to
    > repartition?

    Make sure you get a CD with the drivers, and recovery CDs
    with the OS. On the whole, the big brands you mention offer
    nothing over the (usually cheaper) reputable Taiwanese brands
    such as Acer or Asus. As a matter of fact, they have their
    notebooks built by them (or other contract manufacturers such
    as Samsung).

    --
    Stefaan
    --
    "What is stated clearly conceives easily." -- Inspired sales droid
  2. Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    Stefaan A Eeckels <tengo@DELETEMEecc.lu> wrote in
    news:20040504094726.3429d70e.tengo@DELETEMEecc.lu:

    > On Tue, 04 May 2004 05:53:01 GMT
    > Bruce <parcxman@netscape.net> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> I was comparing Toshiba, Dell, Compaq, and HP laptops tonight at
    >> Circuit City. I'm in the $1500 and less price range. Can anyone
    >> tell me, what's your opinion of the reliability of HP laptops,
    >> primarily with Intel processors? Also, is there a lot proprietary
    >> hardware/software (esp. bios) that would cause me to pull my hair out
    >> if I ever had to repartition?
    >
    > Make sure you get a CD with the drivers, and recovery CDs
    > with the OS. On the whole, the big brands you mention offer
    > nothing over the (usually cheaper) reputable Taiwanese brands
    > such as Acer or Asus. As a matter of fact, they have their
    > notebooks built by them (or other contract manufacturers such
    > as Samsung).
    >

    Thanks for the reply, Stefaan,

    Do you mention CD drivers and recoverys CDs because of what I am reading
    on this ng about desktops? That is, there are many posters complaining
    that their machines didn't come with the most recent CD drivers and they
    are not on the HP site, and that recovery CDs aren't included with your
    purchase, but have to be requested online?

    Bruce
  3. Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    On Tue, 4 May 2004 15:32:29 +0000 (UTC)
    Bruce <parcxman@netscape.net> wrote:

    > Do you mention CD drivers and recoverys CDs because of what I am reading
    > on this ng about desktops? That is, there are many posters complaining
    > that their machines didn't come with the most recent CD drivers and they
    > are not on the HP site, and that recovery CDs aren't included with your
    > purchase, but have to be requested online?

    Recent desktops _and notebooks_ from HP have shown
    a disturbing trend towards absence of CDs. Drivers
    and the OS reinstallation data are provided only on a
    hidden partition, which IMHO is totally inacceptable.

    I would not consider buying such a product, whomever
    the supplier. When I shopped around for a notebook
    earlier this year, I selected an Acer because of the
    fact that it came with a decent driver disk (for W2K
    and XP) and recovery CDs for the OS and all the applications.
    The big brand (HP and Toshiba) notebooks I looked at either
    had neither drivers nor recovery CDs, or no drivers (Toshiba,
    where the salesman offered to give me a copy of a CD he
    claimed to have).

    In addition, the fit and finish of the Acer were way above
    the HP, and as the warranties were similar (2 years carry-in),
    I went for the Acer.

    Something you might also consider is whether the notebook
    can be used without the battery. This will extend the
    life of the battery when the computer is used a lot
    when connected to the mains.

    --
    Stefaan
    --
    "What is stated clearly conceives easily." -- Inspired sales droid
  4. Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    One point you might ask about is the security of a laptop.

    Some people say that a student is much more likely to have a laptop
    stolen than a desktop. It is just to easy to walk away with.

    Ask people whose children have been to college or university lately
    if this is likely to be an issue.

    Aidan Grey


    On Tue, 04 May 2004 05:53:01 GMT, Bruce wrote:

    >Hi,
    >
    >This is my first trip to this ng.
    >
    >I've been looking at laptops for my daugher who's going to college. I've
    >always owned wintel type desktops by Gateway (never again), Dell, and
    >homebuilt. I'm not familiar with HP products, except their laser
    >printers.
    >
    >I was comparing Toshiba, Dell, Compaq, and HP laptops tonight at Circuit
    >City. I'm in the $1500 and less price range. Can anyone tell me, what's
    >your opinion of the reliability of HP laptops, primarily with Intel
    >processors? Also, is there a lot proprietary hardware/software (esp.
    >bios) that would cause me to pull my hair out if I ever had to
    >repartition?
    >
    >
    >Thanks much,
    >Bruce
  5. Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    "Aidan Grey" <apgrey@nospam.con> wrote in message
    news:ncterlbqlffrlbapn.hx7pwd1.pminews@news.odyssey.on.ca...
    > One point you might ask about is the security of a laptop.
    >
    > Some people say that a student is much more likely to have a
    laptop
    > stolen than a desktop. It is just to easy to walk away with.
    >
    > Ask people whose children have been to college or university
    lately
    > if this is likely to be an issue.
    >
    > Aidan Grey
    >


    There are many security cables for laptops which on the theft side
    make it a "not so likely" event. I have mine secured through a whole
    in my desk with a metal ring, the other end is secured via a cable
    with a key. If the dope were to try and remove the unit it would
    render it useless for sale and broken for any use other than my
    insurance company claim.

    I would recommend the targus notebook cable lock. its worth the $40 I
    spent on my laptop. And its an HP ZE4420US and HP has been of no help
    fixing this unit even though its under warranty. I have fixed it
    myself and glad I did. If you buy an HP lap top or desktop expect to
    receive Poor or non existence in service.

    Elector
  6. Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    "Aidan Grey" <apgrey@nospam.con> wrote in
    news:ncterlbqlffrlbapn.hx7pwd1.pminews@news.odyssey.on.ca:

    > One point you might ask about is the security of a laptop.
    >
    > Some people say that a student is much more likely to have a laptop
    > stolen than a desktop. It is just to easy to walk away with.
    >
    > Ask people whose children have been to college or university lately
    > if this is likely to be an issue.
    >
    > Aidan Grey
    >
    >
    > On Tue, 04 May 2004 05:53:01 GMT, Bruce wrote:
    >
    >>Hi,
    >>
    >>This is my first trip to this ng.
    >>
    >>I've been looking at laptops for my daugher who's going to college.
    >>I've always owned wintel type desktops by Gateway (never again), Dell,
    >>and homebuilt. I'm not familiar with HP products, except their laser
    >>printers.
    >>
    >>I was comparing Toshiba, Dell, Compaq, and HP laptops tonight at
    >>Circuit City. I'm in the $1500 and less price range. Can anyone tell
    >>me, what's your opinion of the reliability of HP laptops, primarily
    >>with Intel processors? Also, is there a lot proprietary
    >>hardware/software (esp. bios) that would cause me to pull my hair out
    >>if I ever had to repartition?
    >>
    >>
    >>Thanks much,
    >>Bruce
    >
    >
    >

    Hi, Aidan,

    Yep, that's a consideration. My oldest son graduates next month, and he
    has both a desktop and a laptop. He's been able to hold on to his laptop
    because he keeps his eye on it when at school, and he has his own off
    campus apartment with trustworthy roomates. He also brings it home when
    he visits.

    When he was in the dorms, he only had a desktop, which we cabled to the
    wall. When they closed the dorms during break, he'd bring it home.

    My daughter hasn't decided yet if she wants to go the laptop route, or
    stick with a desktop. She likes the full size keyboard, mouse, and
    monitor. (Yes, I know about docking stations.) I'm on the fence about
    it. I can repair desktops, but if her laptop gets flakey, there's nothing
    I can do, and from what I read, no company (especially HP), has good
    service.

    Bruce

    But,
  7. Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    Get an IBM ThinkPad. Solid construction. Good warranty service, if needed.
    Well designed. Not found in mass market outlets. Prices start a little below
    $1000. If battery life is a major consideration, get one with a slower
    power-conserving Pentium Centrino and disable the WiFi except when in use.

    One of my clients bought a 3GHz Dell notebook without asking my advice, then
    complained that the battery lasts only an hour. So she has a scalding hot
    notebook which won't run too long without line power. Sort of like one of those
    quarter-mile drag racers. Fast = power hungry... Ben Myers

    On Tue, 04 May 2004 05:53:01 GMT, Bruce <parcxman@netscape.net> wrote:

    >Hi,
    >
    >This is my first trip to this ng.
    >
    >I've been looking at laptops for my daugher who's going to college. I've
    >always owned wintel type desktops by Gateway (never again), Dell, and
    >homebuilt. I'm not familiar with HP products, except their laser
    >printers.
    >
    >I was comparing Toshiba, Dell, Compaq, and HP laptops tonight at Circuit
    >City. I'm in the $1500 and less price range. Can anyone tell me, what's
    >your opinion of the reliability of HP laptops, primarily with Intel
    >processors? Also, is there a lot proprietary hardware/software (esp.
    >bios) that would cause me to pull my hair out if I ever had to
    >repartition?
    >
    >
    >Thanks much,
    >Bruce
  8. Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers) wrote in
    news:40996976.17331195@news.charter.net:

    > Get an IBM ThinkPad. Solid construction. Good warranty service, if
    > needed. Well designed. Not found in mass market outlets. Prices
    > start a little below $1000. If battery life is a major consideration,
    > get one with a slower power-conserving Pentium Centrino and disable
    > the WiFi except when in use.
    >
    > One of my clients bought a 3GHz Dell notebook without asking my
    > advice, then complained that the battery lasts only an hour. So she
    > has a scalding hot notebook which won't run too long without line
    > power. Sort of like one of those quarter-mile drag racers. Fast =
    > power hungry... Ben Myers
    >
    > On Tue, 04 May 2004 05:53:01 GMT, Bruce <parcxman@netscape.net> wrote:
    >
    >>Hi,
    >>
    >>This is my first trip to this ng.
    >>
    >>I've been looking at laptops for my daugher who's going to college.
    >>I've always owned wintel type desktops by Gateway (never again), Dell,
    >>and homebuilt. I'm not familiar with HP products, except their laser
    >>printers.
    >>
    >>I was comparing Toshiba, Dell, Compaq, and HP laptops tonight at
    >>Circuit City. I'm in the $1500 and less price range. Can anyone tell
    >>me, what's your opinion of the reliability of HP laptops, primarily
    >>with Intel processors? Also, is there a lot proprietary
    >>hardware/software (esp. bios) that would cause me to pull my hair out
    >>if I ever had to repartition?
    >>
    >>
    >>Thanks much,
    >>Bruce
    >
    >

    Hi, Ben,

    I've just begun to look at the ThinkPads for all the reasons you mention.

    Bruce
  9. Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    Stefaan A Eeckels <tengo@DELETEMEecc.lu> wrote in
    news:20040504183427.5b43f2b3.tengo@DELETEMEecc.lu:

    > Recent desktops _and notebooks_ from HP have shown
    > a disturbing trend towards absence of CDs. Drivers
    > and the OS reinstallation data are provided only on a
    > hidden partition, which IMHO is totally inacceptable.

    FYI: The HP Notebook (ze5260us) that I just bought a couple of weeks ago
    came with a Driver Recovery CD.


    --
    Gail Gurman gail@homemail.com
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------
    Currently on the lookout for an Oakland area paralegal internship or
    part-time technical writing contract.
  10. Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    Stefaan A Eeckels <tengo@deletemeecc.lu> wrote:
    > On Tue, 4 May 2004 15:32:29 +0000 (UTC)
    > Bruce <parcxman@netscape.net> wrote:
    >
    >> Do you mention CD drivers and recoverys CDs because of what I am reading
    >> on this ng about desktops? That is, there are many posters complaining
    >> that their machines didn't come with the most recent CD drivers and they
    >> are not on the HP site, and that recovery CDs aren't included with your
    >> purchase, but have to be requested online?
    >
    > Recent desktops _and notebooks_ from HP have shown
    > a disturbing trend towards absence of CDs. Drivers
    > and the OS reinstallation data are provided only on a
    > hidden partition, which IMHO is totally inacceptable.
    >
    > I would not consider buying such a product, whomever
    > the supplier. When I shopped around for a notebook
    > earlier this year, I selected an Acer because of the
    > fact that it came with a decent driver disk (for W2K
    > and XP) and recovery CDs for the OS and all the applications.
    > The big brand (HP and Toshiba) notebooks I looked at either
    > had neither drivers nor recovery CDs, or no drivers (Toshiba,
    > where the salesman offered to give me a copy of a CD he
    > claimed to have).

    While there is some legitimate need for recovery CDs, IMO the 'need'
    is often blown out of proportion. One also needs backup of one's *own*
    stuff (i.e. 'data', configuration information, installed freeware, etc.)
    and, for all intents and purposes, one needs crash-recovery backup. In
    case of a crash, it is not practical for Joe User to re-install all his
    software, reconfigure every of the zillion [1] settings which he has
    set/changed over the last months to years (and restore his (data)
    backup). When people have proper backup, including crash-recovery
    backup, they normally do not need recovery or/and driver CDs. (Yes,
    there are exceptions, but they are very rare and solvable with
    third-party software.)

    In my case, for Windows XP Professional, I use the Dantz Retrospect
    Express software which came with my external Maxtor disk. It allows to
    create a Disaster Recovery CD (yes, you (temporarily) need a CD writer
    for that). Other people use stuff like Drive Image, etc..

    [1] Case in point: My *incomplete* [2] list of re-configuration
    instructions is currently some 1700 lines!
    [2] The main list refers to other files which contain additional,
    per-subject, re-configuration instructions.
  11. Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    Gail Gurman <gail@homemail.com> wrote in
    news:Xns94E1C17FCB017gailhomemailcom@63.223.5.250:

    > Stefaan A Eeckels <tengo@DELETEMEecc.lu> wrote in
    > news:20040504183427.5b43f2b3.tengo@DELETEMEecc.lu:
    >
    >> Recent desktops _and notebooks_ from HP have shown
    >> a disturbing trend towards absence of CDs. Drivers
    >> and the OS reinstallation data are provided only on a
    >> hidden partition, which IMHO is totally inacceptable.
    >
    > FYI: The HP Notebook (ze5260us) that I just bought a couple of weeks ago
    > came with a Driver Recovery CD.
    >
    >

    Hi, Gail,

    Can you tell me, what's the battery life of that unit?
    (The ze5160us is one laptop on my (long) list.)

    Thanks,
    Bruce
  12. Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    In article <409b4efc$0$60793$cd19a363@news.wanadoo.nl>,
    Frank Slootweg <this@ddress.is.invalid> wrote:
    # While there is some legitimate need for recovery CDs, IMO the 'need'
    #is often blown out of proportion. One also needs backup of one's *own*
    #stuff (i.e. 'data', configuration information, installed freeware, etc.)
    #and, for all intents and purposes, one needs crash-recovery backup.

    Yeah. Right.

    How many recordable DVD's is your complete 30 gig-used system
    crash-recovery backup stored on? How old is it?

    I thought so...

    How many joe users with 2 year old machines, who have a 20G or 80G
    system, have ever made a crash recovery backup during those 2 years?

    I thought so...

    How many joe users, with freshly crashed 2 year old machines, can
    present their "expert" friend with everything that ever came with the
    system... but no crash recovery backup?

    I thought so...

    In
    #case of a crash, it is not practical for Joe User to re-install all his
    #software,

    That's why they call on people like us, and the first thing we ask for
    is the first thing they don't have...

    Ken.
    --
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Mail: kmarsh at charm dot net | Save the environment! Buy US-made
    WWW: http://www.charm.net/~kmarsh | heavy industries products.
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------
  13. Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    Hi,

    Bruce <parcxman@netscape.net> wrote:
    #I was comparing Toshiba, Dell, Compaq, and HP laptops tonight at Circuit
    #City. I'm in the $1500 and less price range. Can anyone tell me, what's
    #your opinion of the reliability of HP laptops, primarily with Intel
    #processors? Also, is there a lot proprietary hardware/software (esp.
    #bios) that would cause me to pull my hair out if I ever had to
    #repartition?

    All laptops are comparatively proprietary in drivers and hardware
    compared to desktops. They are also very limited in hardware upgrades.
    You can upgrade or replace the memory and maybe the disk, and there are
    a couple of PC-Card slots, that's about it.

    If you go the laptop route, I suggest getting a Pentium M. Runs faster
    at half the megahertz because of the big cache. Get one with the latest
    Windoze on it, get the h/w upgrades when you buy it, because everything
    related to that laptop model gets hard to find exactly 6 months after
    you buy it.... if not less time.

    Ken.
    --
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Mail: kmarsh at charm dot net | Save the environment! Buy US-made
    WWW: http://www.charm.net/~kmarsh | heavy industries products.
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------
  14. Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    "Bruce" wrote
    >
    > I've been looking at laptops for my daugher who's going to college. I've
    > always owned wintel type desktops by Gateway (never again), Dell, and
    > homebuilt. I'm not familiar with HP products, except their laser
    > printers.
    >
    > I was comparing Toshiba, Dell, Compaq, and HP laptops tonight at Circuit
    > City. I'm in the $1500 and less price range. Can anyone tell me, what's
    > your opinion of the reliability of HP laptops, primarily with Intel
    > processors? Also, is there a lot proprietary hardware/software (esp.
    > bios) that would cause me to pull my hair out if I ever had to
    > repartition?
    >
    I've bought 2 HP notebooks for my older kids in the last year and had
    absolutely no problems that couldn't be solved by not allowing college-bound
    teenagers to download viruses to them...... I've had to repartition both on
    2 occassions (my personal HP notebook hasn't had problem one in nearly 3
    years) but it didn't really cause any major headaches. I've worked for
    companies that bought Dell's and for some reason EVERY Dell notebook that
    I've been issued has failed within a couple of months, after sending the
    unit to be repaired it always comes back and I've never had a problem
    afterward, but my experience is 3 for 3 with Dell failures. My new work IBM
    notebook has worked flawlessly but I'm not crazy about the design and layout
  15. Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    On 07 May 2004 08:55:24 GMT
    Frank Slootweg <this@ddress.is.invalid> wrote:

    > While there is some legitimate need for recovery CDs, IMO the 'need'
    > is often blown out of proportion.

    Granted. Driver CDs (instead of hidden partitions) are much
    more important. Still, this is a bit like a car manufacturer
    not supplying a second key because most people never lose
    their car keys (and it saves them a few bucks).
    <aside>
    As a matter of fact, I'd prefer a real OS license rather than
    something keyed to a particular brand, but hey, we all know
    we're dealing with a convicted monopoly abuser.
    </aside>

    > One also needs backup of one's *own*
    > stuff (i.e. 'data', configuration information, installed freeware, etc.)
    > and, for all intents and purposes, one needs crash-recovery backup. In
    > case of a crash, it is not practical for Joe User to re-install all his
    > software, reconfigure every of the zillion [1] settings which he has
    > set/changed over the last months to years (and restore his (data)
    > backup).

    This points to a major flaw in the architecture of Windows.
    Installed applications should not be tied to the registry,
    and all setting should be saved in the application's area.
    Given that we're saddled with the registry 'till kingdom
    comes, applications ought to write a copy of their registry
    entries to a file (and maintain a storage area in each user's
    environment) so that applications can be backed up and
    restored individually.

    > When people have proper backup, including crash-recovery
    > backup, they normally do not need recovery or/and driver CDs. (Yes,
    > there are exceptions, but they are very rare and solvable with
    > third-party software.)

    Correct. And a humble suggestion to the lads from Redmond
    is that the next version of Windows should include a backup
    facility that creates a crash-recovery CD (let's finally drive
    a stake though the floppy drive's heart) and correct backups.


    --
    Stefaan
    --
    "What is stated clearly conceives easily." -- Inspired sales droid
  16. Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    "SWMyers" <swmyers@hotmaeel.com> wrote in
    news:MnUmc.9251$nL.8032@fe1.columbus.rr.com:

    > "Bruce" wrote
    >>
    >> I've been looking at laptops for my daugher who's going to college.
    >> I've always owned wintel type desktops by Gateway (never again),
    >> Dell, and homebuilt. I'm not familiar with HP products, except their
    >> laser printers.
    >>
    >> I was comparing Toshiba, Dell, Compaq, and HP laptops tonight at
    >> Circuit City. I'm in the $1500 and less price range. Can anyone
    >> tell me, what's your opinion of the reliability of HP laptops,
    >> primarily with Intel processors? Also, is there a lot proprietary
    >> hardware/software (esp. bios) that would cause me to pull my hair out
    >> if I ever had to repartition?
    >>
    > I've bought 2 HP notebooks for my older kids in the last year and had
    > absolutely no problems that couldn't be solved by not allowing
    > college-bound teenagers to download viruses to them...... I've had to
    > repartition both on 2 occassions (my personal HP notebook hasn't had
    > problem one in nearly 3 years) but it didn't really cause any major
    > headaches. I've worked for companies that bought Dell's and for some
    > reason EVERY Dell notebook that I've been issued has failed within a
    > couple of months, after sending the unit to be repaired it always
    > comes back and I've never had a problem afterward, but my experience
    > is 3 for 3 with Dell failures. My new work IBM notebook has worked
    > flawlessly but I'm not crazy about the design and layout
    >
    >
    >

    Thanks for the reply, SW.

    That's good to hear about the HPs, since they are on my short list.

    Am I correct in my understanding that the Pentium-M is the Pentium
    Centrino that has a specific chipset, WLAN adapter, etc., and not the
    same as the Pentium 4-M, per

    http://www.tomshardware.com/mobile/20030205/

    BTW, I know what you mean about teens and viruses. I've got 6 machines
    networked in the house, and regardless of all the firewalls and av
    software on them, there's one that seems to keep catching viruses. I've
    had to repartition one machine three times; twice between 12/03 and 2/04.
    Luckily, I don't let any of their machines write to the others over the
    network.

    Bruce
  17. Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    Bruce <parcxman@netscape.net> wrote in
    news:Xns94E2C28CAE136parcxmannetscapenet@63.240.76.16:

    > "SWMyers" <swmyers@hotmaeel.com> wrote in
    > news:MnUmc.9251$nL.8032@fe1.columbus.rr.com:
    >
    >> "Bruce" wrote
    >>>
    >>> I've been looking at laptops for my daugher who's going to college.
    >>> I've always owned wintel type desktops by Gateway (never again),
    >>> Dell, and homebuilt. I'm not familiar with HP products, except
    >>> their laser printers.
    >>>
    >>> I was comparing Toshiba, Dell, Compaq, and HP laptops tonight at
    >>> Circuit City. I'm in the $1500 and less price range. Can anyone
    >>> tell me, what's your opinion of the reliability of HP laptops,
    >>> primarily with Intel processors? Also, is there a lot proprietary
    >>> hardware/software (esp. bios) that would cause me to pull my hair
    >>> out if I ever had to repartition?
    >>>
    >> I've bought 2 HP notebooks for my older kids in the last year and had
    >> absolutely no problems that couldn't be solved by not allowing
    >> college-bound teenagers to download viruses to them...... I've had to
    >> repartition both on 2 occassions (my personal HP notebook hasn't had
    >> problem one in nearly 3 years) but it didn't really cause any major
    >> headaches. I've worked for companies that bought Dell's and for some
    >> reason EVERY Dell notebook that I've been issued has failed within a
    >> couple of months, after sending the unit to be repaired it always
    >> comes back and I've never had a problem afterward, but my experience
    >> is 3 for 3 with Dell failures. My new work IBM notebook has worked
    >> flawlessly but I'm not crazy about the design and layout
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >
    > Thanks for the reply, SW.
    >
    > That's good to hear about the HPs, since they are on my short list.
    >
    > Am I correct in my understanding that the Pentium-M is the Pentium
    > Centrino that has a specific chipset, WLAN adapter, etc., and not the
    > same as the Pentium 4-M, per
    >
    > http://www.tomshardware.com/mobile/20030205/
    >
    > BTW, I know what you mean about teens and viruses. I've got 6
    > machines networked in the house, and regardless of all the firewalls
    > and av software on them, there's one that seems to keep catching
    > viruses. I've had to repartition one machine three times; twice
    > between 12/03 and 2/04. Luckily, I don't let any of their machines
    > write to the others over the network.
    >
    > Bruce
    >
    >

    My apologies, the Pentium M question was meant for Ken.

    Bruce
  18. Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    Stefaan A Eeckels <tengo@deletemeecc.lu> wrote:
    > On 07 May 2004 08:55:24 GMT
    > Frank Slootweg <this@ddress.is.invalid> wrote:
    >
    >> While there is some legitimate need for recovery CDs, IMO the 'need'
    >> is often blown out of proportion.
    >
    > Granted. Driver CDs (instead of hidden partitions) are much
    > more important.

    The HP systems I used all had their drivers and other 'added-value'
    software etc. in one directory (tree). Very convenient, *if*, in case of
    a crash, you have backup.

    > Still, this is a bit like a car manufacturer
    > not supplying a second key because most people never lose
    > their car keys (and it saves them a few bucks).
    > <aside>
    > As a matter of fact, I'd prefer a real OS license rather than
    > something keyed to a particular brand, but hey, we all know
    > we're dealing with a convicted monopoly abuser.
    > </aside>
    >
    >> One also needs backup of one's *own*
    >> stuff (i.e. 'data', configuration information, installed freeware, etc.)
    >> and, for all intents and purposes, one needs crash-recovery backup. In
    >> case of a crash, it is not practical for Joe User to re-install all his
    >> software, reconfigure every of the zillion [1] settings which he has
    >> set/changed over the last months to years (and restore his (data)
    >> backup).
    >
    > This points to a major flaw in the architecture of Windows.
    > Installed applications should not be tied to the registry,
    > and all setting should be saved in the application's area.
    > Given that we're saddled with the registry 'till kingdom
    > comes, applications ought to write a copy of their registry
    > entries to a file (and maintain a storage area in each user's
    > environment) so that applications can be backed up and
    > restored individually.

    Yes, the configuration stuff is all over the place, in the registry,
    in system directories, in application directories, sometimes
    system-wide, somtimes per-user, etc..

    For fun have a look at System Restore. It *thinks* it knows where
    everything is and says/implies you will not lose your personal files if
    you do a System Restore to a previous Restore Point. Well, that works
    *if* 1) you are Joe Luser and only put your personal files where MS puts
    them by default *and* 2) use only MS stuff. If you violate one of these
    'rules' you *will* lose you personal files. The *MS* *system* will work
    perfectly in its previous state, just without your stuff, minor point!
    :-(

    >> When people have proper backup, including crash-recovery
    >> backup, they normally do not need recovery or/and driver CDs. (Yes,
    >> there are exceptions, but they are very rare and solvable with
    >> third-party software.)
    >
    > Correct. And a humble suggestion to the lads from Redmond
    > is that the next version of Windows should include a backup
    > facility that creates a crash-recovery CD (let's finally drive
    > a stake though the floppy drive's heart) and correct backups.

    What again where you saying about "a convicted monopoly abuser"? :-)
  19. Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    Ken Marsh <kmarsh@fellspt.charm.net> wrote:
    > In article <409b4efc$0$60793$cd19a363@news.wanadoo.nl>,
    > Frank Slootweg <this@ddress.is.invalid> wrote:
    > # While there is some legitimate need for recovery CDs, IMO the 'need'
    > #is often blown out of proportion. One also needs backup of one's *own*
    > #stuff (i.e. 'data', configuration information, installed freeware, etc.)
    > #and, for all intents and purposes, one needs crash-recovery backup.
    >
    > Yeah. Right.
    >
    > How many recordable DVD's is your complete 30 gig-used system
    > crash-recovery backup stored on?

    Exactly which part of "Disaster Recovery CD" didn't you understand?
    (I.e. it is one/1 CD.) As for the rest of the backup: Hint: "my
    external Maxtor disk".

    > How old is it?

    I don't understand what that has to do with anything, but IIRC about
    one and half year and about half a year when I set this up.

    > I thought so...
    >
    > How many joe users with 2 year old machines, who have a 20G or 80G
    > system, have ever made a crash recovery backup during those 2 years?
    >
    > I thought so...

    Fair point, but why blame a manufacturer for not supplying recovery/
    driver CDs, when supplying such CDs solves exactly nothing (or are you
    implying that they *do* make backup, just not crash-recovery backup?)?

    > How many joe users, with freshly crashed 2 year old machines, can
    > present their "expert" friend with everything that ever came with the
    > system... but no crash recovery backup?
    >
    > I thought so...

    See above.

    > In
    > #case of a crash, it is not practical for Joe User to re-install all his
    > #software,
    >
    > That's why they call on people like us, and the first thing we ask for
    > is the first thing they don't have...

    Yes, silly us! :-)
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