Please help me get into my LAN from work

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

I know this has been covered, and I've done my due diligence in Google, but
I cannot figure out my problem, and my cable internet company basically told
me to take a hike.
I have a LAN behind a Dlink DI614+ router. One of the devices on my network
is a Dlink DCS-900W wireless camera, with a fixed address of 192.168.0.20.
My router is otherwise set up for DHCP. I can access the camera through a
browser from any pc on my LAN, no problems. However, I cannot access it
from outside my LAN. Since the camera has a built-in web server, I used
"virtual server" in my router to forward port 80 to the wireless camera.
The IP address from my ISP, Time Warner cable, is not static, but it hasn't
changed in a year, so I think I should be able to hit my LAN from the
internet, assuming the router settings are correct. Is that a bad
assumption? Is it okay that I leave my router and pc's set to DHCP? I have
wondered if there is a conflict with port 80, having to do with the camera's
"fixed" address being in the router's DHCP range.
BTW, as for any help from Time Warner, I emailed asking if they blocked http
or other protocols to dynamic/residential IPs, and they didn't give me an
answer, just saying that troubleshooting my network problems was not their
business. I tried to explain that I was only wanting to know if I had to
have a static or "public" IP to do what I wanted to do. So much for any
help from them.
Any assistance with this is GREATLY appreciated. Thank you.

jakesnake
7 answers Last reply
More about please work
  1. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    On Wed, 04 Aug 2004 01:37:23 GMT, jakesnake66 spoketh

    >I know this has been covered, and I've done my due diligence in Google, but
    >I cannot figure out my problem, and my cable internet company basically told
    >me to take a hike.
    >I have a LAN behind a Dlink DI614+ router. One of the devices on my network
    >is a Dlink DCS-900W wireless camera, with a fixed address of 192.168.0.20.
    >My router is otherwise set up for DHCP. I can access the camera through a
    >browser from any pc on my LAN, no problems. However, I cannot access it
    >from outside my LAN. Since the camera has a built-in web server, I used
    >"virtual server" in my router to forward port 80 to the wireless camera.
    >The IP address from my ISP, Time Warner cable, is not static, but it hasn't
    >changed in a year, so I think I should be able to hit my LAN from the
    >internet, assuming the router settings are correct. Is that a bad
    >assumption? Is it okay that I leave my router and pc's set to DHCP? I have
    >wondered if there is a conflict with port 80, having to do with the camera's
    >"fixed" address being in the router's DHCP range.
    >BTW, as for any help from Time Warner, I emailed asking if they blocked http
    >or other protocols to dynamic/residential IPs, and they didn't give me an
    >answer, just saying that troubleshooting my network problems was not their
    >business. I tried to explain that I was only wanting to know if I had to
    >have a static or "public" IP to do what I wanted to do. So much for any
    >help from them.
    >Any assistance with this is GREATLY appreciated. Thank you.
    >
    >jakesnake
    >

    If forwarding port 80 to the static internal IP address on your camera
    doesn't work, then it is very possible that your ISP is blocking port
    80. Many ISPs do... If your router supports port translation, you can
    forward another port (ie 8080) to port 80 on your camera...

    Lars M. Hansen
    http://www.hansenonline.net
    (replace 'badnews' with 'news' in e-mail address)
  2. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    "Lars M. Hansen" <badnews@hansenonline.net> wrote in message
    news:h662h05dm92f3v2cnpsdo9c7e8lan35has@4ax.com...
    > On Wed, 04 Aug 2004 01:37:23 GMT, jakesnake66 spoketh
    >
    > >I know this has been covered, and I've done my due diligence in Google,
    but
    > >I cannot figure out my problem, and my cable internet company basically
    told
    > >me to take a hike.
    > >I have a LAN behind a Dlink DI614+ router. One of the devices on my
    network
    > >is a Dlink DCS-900W wireless camera, with a fixed address of
    192.168.0.20.
    > >My router is otherwise set up for DHCP. I can access the camera through
    a
    > >browser from any pc on my LAN, no problems. However, I cannot access it
    > >from outside my LAN. Since the camera has a built-in web server, I used
    > >"virtual server" in my router to forward port 80 to the wireless camera.
    > >The IP address from my ISP, Time Warner cable, is not static, but it
    hasn't
    > >changed in a year, so I think I should be able to hit my LAN from the
    > >internet, assuming the router settings are correct. Is that a bad
    > >assumption? Is it okay that I leave my router and pc's set to DHCP? I
    have
    > >wondered if there is a conflict with port 80, having to do with the
    camera's
    > >"fixed" address being in the router's DHCP range.
    > >BTW, as for any help from Time Warner, I emailed asking if they blocked
    http
    > >or other protocols to dynamic/residential IPs, and they didn't give me an
    > >answer, just saying that troubleshooting my network problems was not
    their
    > >business. I tried to explain that I was only wanting to know if I had to
    > >have a static or "public" IP to do what I wanted to do. So much for any
    > >help from them.
    > >Any assistance with this is GREATLY appreciated. Thank you.
    > >
    > >jakesnake
    > >
    >
    > If forwarding port 80 to the static internal IP address on your camera
    > doesn't work, then it is very possible that your ISP is blocking port
    > 80. Many ISPs do... If your router supports port translation, you can
    > forward another port (ie 8080) to port 80 on your camera...
    >
    > Lars M. Hansen
    > http://www.hansenonline.net
    > (replace 'badnews' with 'news' in e-mail address)
    Nobody can block port 80. That's the internet port.
    Here are some common ports.


    ssh 22/tcp SSH Remote Login Protocol
    ssh 22/udp SSH Remote Login Protocol

    telnet 23/tcp Telnet
    telnet 23/udp Telnet


    finger 79/tcp Finger
    finger 79/udp Finger

    http 80/tcp World Wide Web HTTP
    http 80/udp World Wide Web HTTP
    www 80/tcp World Wide Web HTTP
    www 80/udp World Wide Web HTTP
    www-http 80/tcp World Wide Web HTTP
    www-http 80/udp World Wide Web HTTP

    The list I use is at:
    http://www.iana.org/assignments/port-numbers


    Now as to the original question he is never going to be able to access a 192
    IP address from the web because that is an open private IP address. Anyone
    can use an address in the 192.XXX.XXX.1 - 254 range on their private LAN.
    As a matter of fact the computer I'm on now uses 192.168.254.xxx which is
    usually 119 and I can publish that with the sure knowledge that nobody can
    get into my computer because I'm behind a router doing NAT and acting as a
    gateway to the WWW.
    I used to be on a static IP that was "on the web" and got all kinds of UDP
    probes on my firewall all the time. I have now uninstalled the firewall
    because it was just taking up CPU cycles.
    Hope this helps.
    AG
  3. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Hi,
    I don't have experience with a wireless camera connected to my LAN (will be
    the case when I find a suitable one) and haven't read the user manual for
    your router, but I have experience with a web server running on one of my
    PC's behind a Sitecom router.
    The Sitecom router offers virtual servers, just select the service (=Web),
    define the external port number and the internal port number.
    If you are using a fixed IP address for your camera, you don't have to
    worry, just make sure that the IP address of the camera is connected to the
    vitual server feature.

    In most cases, the IP address from the ISP stays the same. If you want to
    make life easy, use a free Dynamic DNS (DDNS) service.
    There are several free DDNS services, I am using http://www.dyndns.org/
    How does it work, register yourself and connect your ISP IP address to the
    DDNS-name.

    As I said, I don't know the Dlink router, but the Sitecom has a special
    setting DDNS => changes in the ISP IP-address are automatically forwarded to
    DynDNS => No more worries.

    Example: http://jakesnake.homedns.org:8989/.....

    /rob

    "jakesnake66" <jake@lycos.com> wrote in message
    news:n5XPc.114117$fv.72143@fe2.columbus.rr.com...
    > I know this has been covered, and I've done my due diligence in Google,
    but
    > I cannot figure out my problem, and my cable internet company basically
    told
    > me to take a hike.
    > I have a LAN behind a Dlink DI614+ router. One of the devices on my
    network
    > is a Dlink DCS-900W wireless camera, with a fixed address of 192.168.0.20.
    > My router is otherwise set up for DHCP. I can access the camera through a
    > browser from any pc on my LAN, no problems. However, I cannot access it
    > from outside my LAN. Since the camera has a built-in web server, I used
    > "virtual server" in my router to forward port 80 to the wireless camera.
    > The IP address from my ISP, Time Warner cable, is not static, but it
    hasn't
    > changed in a year, so I think I should be able to hit my LAN from the
    > internet, assuming the router settings are correct. Is that a bad
    > assumption? Is it okay that I leave my router and pc's set to DHCP? I
    have
    > wondered if there is a conflict with port 80, having to do with the
    camera's
    > "fixed" address being in the router's DHCP range.
    > BTW, as for any help from Time Warner, I emailed asking if they blocked
    http
    > or other protocols to dynamic/residential IPs, and they didn't give me an
    > answer, just saying that troubleshooting my network problems was not their
    > business. I tried to explain that I was only wanting to know if I had to
    > have a static or "public" IP to do what I wanted to do. So much for any
    > help from them.
    > Any assistance with this is GREATLY appreciated. Thank you.
    >
    > jakesnake
    >
    >
    >
    >
  4. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    On Wed, 4 Aug 2004 15:03:14 -0500, AG spoketh

    >Nobody can block port 80. That's the internet port.

    Of course they can block port 80. They can block any port _IN_ to their
    customers that they want, especially when the TOS says that you can't
    host a web server...

    >
    >
    >Now as to the original question he is never going to be able to access a 192
    >IP address from the web because that is an open private IP address. Anyone
    >can use an address in the 192.XXX.XXX.1 - 254 range on their private LAN.

    I suggest you read up on NAT routers. Of course he can access anything
    on his LAN from anywhere, because he'll be using the EXTERNAL public IP
    address of his router, which will forward the traffic to the internal IP
    address.


    Lars M. Hansen
    www.hansenonline.net
    Remove "bad" from my e-mail address to contact me.
    "If you try to fail, and succeed, which have you done?"
  5. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    "Lars M. Hansen" <badnews@hansenonline.net> wrote in message
    news:t0t2h09ccj07ged5qnm6rdf80ma7vpq59s@4ax.com...
    > On Wed, 4 Aug 2004 15:03:14 -0500, AG spoketh
    >
    > >Nobody can block port 80. That's the internet port.
    >
    > Of course they can block port 80. They can block any port _IN_ to their
    > customers that they want, especially when the TOS says that you can't
    > host a web server...
    >
    > >
    > >
    > >Now as to the original question he is never going to be able to access a
    192
    > >IP address from the web because that is an open private IP address.
    Anyone
    > >can use an address in the 192.XXX.XXX.1 - 254 range on their private LAN.
    >
    > I suggest you read up on NAT routers. Of course he can access anything
    > on his LAN from anywhere, because he'll be using the EXTERNAL public IP
    > address of his router, which will forward the traffic to the internal IP
    > address.
    >
    >
    > Lars M. Hansen
    > www.hansenonline.net
    > Remove "bad" from my e-mail address to contact me.
    > "If you try to fail, and succeed, which have you done?"

    You're right, it can be done but not just by simply typing in that IP 192
    address and expecting to get into the camera. He's going to have to get to
    the router first, then forward his requests to the camera. I'm not sure how
    to do it since I've got plenty of IP addresses that I can use to put
    equipment on when I need web access to it.
    That's the good thing about working at a small ISP that bought more
    addresses than we really needed back in '98 when we started.
    AG
  6. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    On Thu, 5 Aug 2004 08:17:13 -0500, AG spoketh

    >
    >You're right, it can be done but not just by simply typing in that IP 192
    >address and expecting to get into the camera. He's going to have to get to
    >the router first, then forward his requests to the camera. I'm not sure how
    >to do it since I've got plenty of IP addresses that I can use to put
    >equipment on when I need web access to it.
    >That's the good thing about working at a small ISP that bought more
    >addresses than we really needed back in '98 when we started.
    >AG
    >

    He never said he used the private address from the public side...

    Lars M. Hansen
    www.hansenonline.net
    Remove "bad" from my e-mail address to contact me.
    "If you try to fail, and succeed, which have you done?"
  7. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Port 80 can be blocked just like any other port.


    On Wed, 4 Aug 2004 15:03:14 -0500, "AG" <atenor@email.com> wrote:

    >Nobody can block port 80. That's the internet port.
    >Here are some common ports.
Ask a new question

Read More

Routers LAN Cameras Wireless Networking