Which Wireless REPEATER ?

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

I need to boost the signal from a WRT54G thru-out the house.

Thinking of antennas and repeaters.

Which repeater do you recommend ?
24 answers Last reply
More about which wireless repeater
  1. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    ~ I need to boost the signal from a WRT54G thru-out the house.
    ~
    ~ Thinking of antennas and repeaters.
    ~
    ~ Which repeater do you recommend ?
    ~

    I'd first consider using higher gain antennas. For the
    WRT54G which uses reverse TNC connectors (the stock antennas
    are 2 dBi or so), you could go with the Linksys HGA7T
    antenna kit, which are 7 dBi omnis. This could be good
    if your coverage area is all in the same plane (e.g. you
    have a one storey house to cover.)
    http://www.linksys.com/products/product.asp?grid=33&scid=38&prid=643

    If you want to use a repeater, in general, you will need to
    get a repeater from the same vendor as supplied your access
    point (/wireless router). The standards do not specify
    interoperability for repeaters; even Cisco Aironet APs
    (repeaters) are not compatible with Cisco Linksys repeaters
    (APs.) So, for compatibility with the Linksys WRT54G,
    I'd recommend the Linksys WRE54G.
    http://www.linksys.com/products/product.asp?grid=33&scid=38&prid=629

    Aaron
  2. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    I would get an antenna rather than a repeater.

    --
    Bob Alston

    <sam1967@hetnet.nl> wrote in message
    news:2sp1h01ha8lr7fchg9dqb7tkhmadncnqc9@4ax.com...
    > I need to boost the signal from a WRT54G thru-out the house.
    >
    > Thinking of antennas and repeaters.
    >
    > Which repeater do you recommend ?
    >
    >


    ---
    Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
    Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
    Version: 6.0.733 / Virus Database: 487 - Release Date: 8/2/2004
  3. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    sam1967@hetnet.nl wrote:
    > I need to boost the signal from a WRT54G thru-out the house.

    I believe you can get firmware (see www.linksysinfo.com for sveasoft,
    others) for that router that enables boosting the power. But what I did
    was add a small homemade parabolic antenna over one of the dipoles aimed
    past the living room to the office on the far side of the house (with four
    old-fashioned wire lath and heavy plaster walls in the way).

    Signal strength in the office registered on WET54G bridge went from the
    50's to 81%; and off-axis about 90 degrees (although still fed by the
    other dipole) through only one wire lath wall and one sheetrock wall, I
    still get a signal my HP laptop reports as "very good" at 54mbps.

    I got the antenna template at www.freeantennas.com (the X12 version).

    --
    Steve
  4. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    On Wed, 04 Aug 2004 14:44:13 GMT, "Bob Alston" <bobalston9
    NOSPAM@aol.com> wrote:

    >I would get an antenna rather than a repeater.

    There is nowhere on the WRT54G to attach an antenna.
    Or am I just not looking properly.
  5. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    You remove the right hand "rubber ducky" antenna and install an alternate
    antenna.

    --
    Bob Alston

    <sam1967@hetnet.nl> wrote in message
    news:o112h01tj7b4pj78uf1k8nhgg7umld1e2p@4ax.com...
    > On Wed, 04 Aug 2004 14:44:13 GMT, "Bob Alston" <bobalston9
    > NOSPAM@aol.com> wrote:
    >
    > >I would get an antenna rather than a repeater.
    >
    > There is nowhere on the WRT54G to attach an antenna.
    > Or am I just not looking properly.
    >
    >


    ---
    Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
    Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
    Version: 6.0.733 / Virus Database: 487 - Release Date: 8/2/2004
  6. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    On Wed, 04 Aug 2004 16:32:05 GMT, "Bob Alston" <bobalston9
    NOSPAM@aol.com> wrote:

    >You remove the right hand "rubber ducky" antenna and install an alternate
    >antenna.

    Which is the right antenna? Looking from the front or the back?

    Linksys antennas have a plastic sleeve covering the R-TNC connector.
    If you just turn the sleeve, it spins making the antenna appear to be
    permanently afixed. Tilt the antenna hinge point down so that the
    antenna is pointed in a stright line, rather than the usual right
    angle. Slide the plastic connector cover toward the tip of the
    antenna. That should expose the R-TNC connector. Unscrew the
    antenna.


    --
    Jeff Liebermann jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
    150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
    Santa Cruz CA 95060 AE6KS 831-336-2558
  7. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    On Wed, 04 Aug 2004 09:36:51 -0700, Aaron Leonard <Aaron@Cisco.COM>
    wrote:

    >~ I need to boost the signal from a WRT54G thru-out the house.
    >~
    >~ Thinking of antennas and repeaters.
    >~
    >~ Which repeater do you recommend ?
    >~
    >
    >I'd first consider using higher gain antennas. For the
    >WRT54G which uses reverse TNC connectors (the stock antennas
    >are 2 dBi or so), you could go with the Linksys HGA7T
    >antenna kit, which are 7 dBi omnis. This could be good
    >if your coverage area is all in the same plane (e.g. you
    >have a one storey house to cover.)
    >http://www.linksys.com/products/product.asp?grid=33&scid=38&prid=643
    >
    thanks. just bought one very similar on ebay.

    >If you want to use a repeater, in general, you will need to
    >get a repeater from the same vendor as supplied your access
    >point (/wireless router). The standards do not specify
    >interoperability for repeaters; even Cisco Aironet APs
    >(repeaters) are not compatible with Cisco Linksys repeaters
    >(APs.) So, for compatibility with the Linksys WRT54G,
    >I'd recommend the Linksys WRE54G.
    >http://www.linksys.com/products/product.asp?grid=33&scid=38&prid=629
    >
    >Aaron
  8. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    On Wed, 04 Aug 2004 16:11:04 GMT, Steve Caple
    <stevecaple@commoncast.net> wrote:

    >sam1967@hetnet.nl wrote:
    >> I need to boost the signal from a WRT54G thru-out the house.
    >
    >I believe you can get firmware (see www.linksysinfo.com for sveasoft,
    >others) for that router that enables boosting the power. But what I did
    >was add a small homemade parabolic antenna over one of the dipoles aimed
    >past the living room to the office on the far side of the house (with four
    >old-fashioned wire lath and heavy plaster walls in the way).
    >
    >Signal strength in the office registered on WET54G bridge went from the
    >50's to 81%; and off-axis about 90 degrees (although still fed by the
    >other dipole) through only one wire lath wall and one sheetrock wall, I
    >still get a signal my HP laptop reports as "very good" at 54mbps.
    >
    >I got the antenna template at www.freeantennas.com (the X12 version).

    I will definitely try this after Ive tried the pre-fab one I just
    bought on ebay.
    I am just not very good at building things from scratch.
  9. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    On Wed, 04 Aug 2004 20:22:27 +0100, sam1967@hetnet.nl wrote:

    >On Wed, 04 Aug 2004 11:31:10 -0700, Jeff Liebermann

    >>I borrowed a 2 pair telephone line (CAT-Zero?) between floors and used
    >
    >what do you mean by borrowed ?

    The house was wired for a central telephone system with two cheap
    2-pair station wires (not CAT-3) between each room and the basement.
    There was no easy way I could run CAT5 between upstairs and the
    basement, so I crimped a RJ45 connectors on the ends of the phone
    wires and used it to connect the radios. I don't like doing it this
    way, but I have done far worse (don't ask).

    >do you have to use a wire to connect the APs ?

    You need some kind of wire to connect two radios that cannot talk to
    each other via RF. The correct way is CAT5, but for short distances,
    just about anything will work. If the radios could have talked to
    each other, then WDS or client mode would have been possible.

    >could I just use a CAT5 to connect the two APs ?

    Yes. You *SHOULD* use CAT5 for ethernet. However, that was not
    available for what I was doing. Besides, the customer is a friend and
    is known to be cheap.


    --
    # Jeff Liebermann 150 Felker St #D Santa Cruz CA 95060
    # 831.336.2558 voice http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
    # jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
    # 831.421.6491 digital_pager jeffl@cruzio.com AE6KS
  10. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    sam1967@hetnet.nl wrote:
    > I am just not very good at building things from scratch.

    Print it out on cover stock, spray glue or siicone glue some foil to the
    back, cut it out with scisors and/or an Exacto knife - grade school level
    stuff, really easy, no wiring, no connectors to buy, just slip it over the
    rubber ducky and aim it, roughly.


    --
    Steve
    Bush fooled ya once, shame on him.
    If he fools ya twice, shame on you!
    (And look out, Nelly!)
  11. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    On Thu, 05 Aug 2004 01:10:46 GMT, Jeff Liebermann
    <jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us> wrote:

    >On Wed, 04 Aug 2004 20:22:27 +0100, sam1967@hetnet.nl wrote:
    >
    >>On Wed, 04 Aug 2004 11:31:10 -0700, Jeff Liebermann
    >
    >>>I borrowed a 2 pair telephone line (CAT-Zero?) between floors and used
    >>
    >>what do you mean by borrowed ?
    >
    >The house was wired for a central telephone system with two cheap
    >2-pair station wires (not CAT-3) between each room and the basement.
    >There was no easy way I could run CAT5 between upstairs and the
    >basement, so I crimped a RJ45 connectors on the ends of the phone
    >wires and used it to connect the radios. I don't like doing it this
    >way, but I have done far worse (don't ask).
    >
    >>do you have to use a wire to connect the APs ?
    >
    >You need some kind of wire to connect two radios that cannot talk to
    >each other via RF.

    i am with you now. they couldnt communicate because of the walls.
    hence the wire.

    > The correct way is CAT5, but for short distances,
    >just about anything will work. If the radios could have talked to
    >each other, then WDS or client mode would have been possible.

    >>could I just use a CAT5 to connect the two APs ?
    >
    >Yes. You *SHOULD* use CAT5 for ethernet. However, that was not
    >available for what I was doing. Besides, the customer is a friend and
    >is known to be cheap.

    thanks again. i am convinced about what i should do.
    i have bought a pair of cheap 5 db antennas on ebay with TNC
    connectors. i will stick one (? ) on the linksys wrt54g.

    if i cant get a signal where i want it i will buy another access point
    (presumably the wap54g from linksys) and run a cat5 cable between
    them.

    anything special i need to do to configure the second AP ?
  12. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    On Thu, 05 Aug 2004 09:31:25 +0100, sam1967@hetnet.nl wrote:

    You really should repair the shift key on your keyboard.

    >i am with you now. they couldnt communicate because of the walls.
    >hence the wire.

    Correct.

    >i have bought a pair of cheap 5 db antennas on ebay with TNC
    >connectors. i will stick one (? ) on the linksys wrt54g.

    One is sufficient. Point it in the direction you want to cover. If
    you have "holes" (dead spots) in your coverage at the other end of the
    building, attaching the 2nd antenna will offer some level of diversity
    switching. If one antenna doesn't get the signal, perhaps the other
    one will. 5dBi isn't a huge amount of gain so this will help, but
    probably not perform a miraclous improvement.

    >if i cant get a signal where i want it i will buy another access point
    >(presumably the wap54g from linksys) and run a cat5 cable between
    >them.
    >
    >anything special i need to do to configure the second AP ?

    Here's where it gets a bit complicated. In theory, you want an
    "access point" and not a "wireless router". The only real difference
    here is that the wireless router has a router section and the access
    point does not. However, you can use most wireless routers as an
    access point by simply ignoring the WAN port. Another WRT54G will
    work but is not required.

    You will need to deal with the following issues on the 2nd access
    point:
    1. Don't attach anything to the WAN port. It's not needed.
    2. Use the same SSID on both radios.
    3. Disable the DHCP server on the 2nd radio.
    4. If the two radios can hear each other, use different channels
    (channels 1, 6, or 11). If they are well isolated, the same channel
    may be used.
    5. You probably do NOT need a CAT5 crossover cable as most AP's have
    some means of dealing with the ethernet cable polarity. Watch the
    lights.
    6. If you are using MAC address filtering on the main wireless
    router, then you'll need to configure the 2nd access point in exactly
    the same manner.
    7. The official limit is 100m of CAT5 cable, but I know it will work
    to about 900ft of cable. If you're using junk wire, CAT5, etc, about
    30m is the limit. Since most routers offer no manual control over the
    10/100 speed, you will have problems with >100m runs if it switches to
    100baseT. Therefore you may need to install a 10baseT only hub in the
    circuit to force the speed to stay at 10baseT HDX.

    I'm sure I forgot something, so don't assume this is everything you
    need to know.


    --
    Jeff Liebermann jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
    150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
    Santa Cruz CA 95060 AE6KS 831-336-2558
  13. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    On Wed, 04 Aug 2004 21:39:45 GMT,
    info_at_cabling-design_dot_com@foo.com (Dmitri(Cabling-Design.com))
    wrote:

    >I guess, that would mean that Jeff crimped RJ45 plugs on the wire and run
    >10BASE-T between the APs.

    Correct.

    The owner did not want to pay me to do a proper wiring job. To run
    the CAT5, he will probably bribe his 15 year old son, who in turn will
    borrow all the wire, tools, connectors, etc from me to do the job.
    In about a week, I expect to be invited to dinner where I'll be asked
    to fix the crimping job. Incidentally, he had several perfectly good
    RG-6/u coax runs available, which I wanted to use with media
    converters (or old hubs) for 10base2, but the owner didn't want to pay
    me for the hardware.

    Beware of doing business with cheap friends.

    >I would also guess that, even with high bit
    >error rates the wired link was probably still faster than the "b"
    >wireless.

    Not really. There's a big problem with NWAY negotiation when using
    cheap routers, access points, and switches. Few offer any control
    over the negotiated speed and protocol (half vs full duplex). The
    result is that the two access points could easily settle on
    100baseTX-FDX and end up just sending errors back and forth over the
    poor quality cabling. While 10baseT-HDX would work just fine, there's
    no configurable way to force 10baseT on most cheap access points.
    What I have to do is insert an old 10baseT hub (not switch) in the
    line so that each router/AP see's only the hub. Then NWAY switches to
    10baseT-HDX. In this specific case, the ancient Eumitcom access point
    did only 10baseT-HDX on the LAN port, so there was no problem. This
    is one case where faster (ethernet) is not better.

    As for performance, 10baseT-HDX will deliver about 6Mbits/sec which is
    approximately the same as what an 11Mbit/sec 802.11b connection will
    deliver under ideal conditions. It's a good match for an 802.11b
    access point. However, if he had used an 802.11b repeater, the
    thruput would have been cut in half because the RF link is half duplex
    and everything needs to be sent twice. I also doubt that I could
    maintain an 11Mbits/sec wireless association through multiple walls in
    a building. Of course 100baseT would be better, but not with junk
    telco station wire.

    >The best (though time consuming) way to borrow that cable would be to use
    >it as a pull string for a brand new CAT5E (CAT6) cable, which would
    >provide enough throughput to link two "g" APs.

    Yep. 802.11g delivers about 33Mbits/sec thruput. No way is 10baseT
    going to handle that.


    --
    Jeff Liebermann jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
    150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
    Santa Cruz CA 95060 AE6KS 831-336-2558
  14. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    On Thu, 05 Aug 2004 09:39:00 -0700, Jeff Liebermann
    <jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us> wrote:

    >On Thu, 05 Aug 2004 09:31:25 +0100, sam1967@hetnet.nl wrote:
    >
    >You really should repair the shift key on your keyboard.

    dont be such a twat.

    >
    >>i am with you now. they couldnt communicate because of the walls.
    >>hence the wire.
    >
    >Correct.
    >
    >>i have bought a pair of cheap 5 db antennas on ebay with TNC
    >>connectors. i will stick one (? ) on the linksys wrt54g.
    >
    >One is sufficient. Point it in the direction you want to cover. If
    >you have "holes" (dead spots) in your coverage at the other end of the
    >building, attaching the 2nd antenna will offer some level of diversity
    >switching. If one antenna doesn't get the signal, perhaps the other
    >one will. 5dBi isn't a huge amount of gain so this will help, but
    >probably not perform a miraclous improvement.
    >
    >>if i cant get a signal where i want it i will buy another access point
    >>(presumably the wap54g from linksys) and run a cat5 cable between
    >>them.
    >>
    >>anything special i need to do to configure the second AP ?
    >
    >Here's where it gets a bit complicated. In theory, you want an
    >"access point" and not a "wireless router". The only real difference
    >here is that the wireless router has a router section and the access
    >point does not. However, you can use most wireless routers as an
    >access point by simply ignoring the WAN port. Another WRT54G will
    >work but is not required.
    >
    >You will need to deal with the following issues on the 2nd access
    >point:
    >1. Don't attach anything to the WAN port. It's not needed.
    >2. Use the same SSID on both radios.
    >3. Disable the DHCP server on the 2nd radio.
    >4. If the two radios can hear each other, use different channels
    >(channels 1, 6, or 11). If they are well isolated, the same channel
    >may be used.
    >5. You probably do NOT need a CAT5 crossover cable as most AP's have
    >some means of dealing with the ethernet cable polarity. Watch the
    >lights.
    >6. If you are using MAC address filtering on the main wireless
    >router, then you'll need to configure the 2nd access point in exactly
    >the same manner.
    >7. The official limit is 100m of CAT5 cable, but I know it will work
    >to about 900ft of cable. If you're using junk wire, CAT5, etc, about
    >30m is the limit. Since most routers offer no manual control over the
    >10/100 speed, you will have problems with >100m runs if it switches to
    >100baseT. Therefore you may need to install a 10baseT only hub in the
    >circuit to force the speed to stay at 10baseT HDX.
    >
    >I'm sure I forgot something, so don't assume this is everything you
    >need to know.
  15. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    sam1967@hetnet.nl wrote:
    >Jeff Liebermann <jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us> wrote:
    >>sam1967@hetnet.nl wrote:
    >>You really should repair the shift key on your keyboard.

    >dont be such a twat.

    And learn to trim.

    --
    William Smith
    ComputerSmiths Consulting, Inc. www.compusmiths.com
  16. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    On Thu, 05 Aug 2004 09:39:00 -0700, Jeff Liebermann
    <jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us> wrote:

    >On Thu, 05 Aug 2004 09:31:25 +0100, sam1967@hetnet.nl wrote:
    >
    >You really should repair the shift key on your keyboard.
    >
    >>i am with you now. they couldnt communicate because of the walls.
    >>hence the wire.
    >
    >Correct.
    >
    >>i have bought a pair of cheap 5 db antennas on ebay with TNC
    >>connectors. i will stick one (? ) on the linksys wrt54g.
    >
    >One is sufficient. Point it in the direction you want to cover. If
    >you have "holes" (dead spots) in your coverage at the other end of the
    >building, attaching the 2nd antenna will offer some level of diversity
    >switching. If one antenna doesn't get the signal, perhaps the other
    >one will. 5dBi isn't a huge amount of gain so this will help, but
    >probably not perform a miraclous improvement.
    >
    >>if i cant get a signal where i want it i will buy another access point
    >>(presumably the wap54g from linksys) and run a cat5 cable between
    >>them.
    >>
    >>anything special i need to do to configure the second AP ?
    >
    >Here's where it gets a bit complicated. In theory, you want an
    >"access point" and not a "wireless router". The only real difference
    >here is that the wireless router has a router section and the access
    >point does not. However, you can use most wireless routers as an
    >access point by simply ignoring the WAN port. Another WRT54G will
    >work but is not required.
    >
    >You will need to deal with the following issues on the 2nd access
    >point:
    >1. Don't attach anything to the WAN port. It's not needed.
    >2. Use the same SSID on both radios.
    >3. Disable the DHCP server on the 2nd radio.
    >4. If the two radios can hear each other, use different channels
    >(channels 1, 6, or 11). If they are well isolated, the same channel
    >may be used.
    >5. You probably do NOT need a CAT5 crossover cable as most AP's have
    >some means of dealing with the ethernet cable polarity. Watch the
    >lights.
    >6. If you are using MAC address filtering on the main wireless
    >router, then you'll need to configure the 2nd access point in exactly
    >the same manner.
    >7. The official limit is 100m of CAT5 cable, but I know it will work
    >to about 900ft of cable. If you're using junk wire, CAT5, etc, about
    >30m is the limit. Since most routers offer no manual control over the
    >10/100 speed, you will have problems with >100m runs if it switches to
    >100baseT. Therefore you may need to install a 10baseT only hub in the
    >circuit to force the speed to stay at 10baseT HDX.
    >
    >I'm sure I forgot something, so don't assume this is everything you
    >need to know.

    great advice. thanks. im too bad a typist to use sentence case. it
    slows me down.
  17. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Kerry has been fooling you since his 4-month stint in Vietnam and he's
    still fooling you.

    On Thu, 05 Aug 2004 01:58:53 GMT, Steve Caple
    <stevecaple@commoncast.net> wrote:

    >Bush fooled ya once, shame on him.
    >If he fools ya twice, shame on you!
  18. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    On Thu, 05 Aug 2004 15:01:03 -0400, William P.N. Smith wrote:

    >sam1967@hetnet.nl wrote:
    >>Jeff Liebermann <jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us> wrote:
    >>>sam1967@hetnet.nl wrote:
    >>>You really should repair the shift key on your keyboard.
    >
    >>dont be such a twat.
    >
    >And learn to trim.

    I was being ironic.

    you obviously dont know what twat means here (holland) .

    it is a word used in the publishing industry for someone who is
    over-fastidious about grammar and punctuation (something I can never
    be accused of) .

    hope you have taken no offence Jeff as your contributions are simply
    stellar.
  19. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    sam1967@hetnet.nl wrote:
    >you obviously dont know what twat means here (holland) .

    >it is a word used in the publishing industry for someone who is
    >over-fastidious about grammar and punctuation (something I can never
    >be accused of) .

    Ah. It's different in the US. Very different.

    --
    William Smith
    ComputerSmiths Consulting, Inc. www.compusmiths.com
  20. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    On Thu, 05 Aug 2004 20:10:39 GMT, Doug Jamal
    <unimportantbishiv6atyahoodotcom@yahoo.com> wrote:

    >Kerry has been fooling you since his 4-month stint in Vietnam and he's
    >still fooling you.
    >
    But Moore is no-ones fool.
  21. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Doug Jamal wrote:
    > Kerry has been fooling you since his 4-month stint in Vietnam and he's
    > still fooling you.

    That was his second stint. And he's not fooling me - I know he's a son
    of wealth and privilege, but so's Bush and at least Kerry says he won't
    date rape the country to keep giving Shrub's buddies huge tax breaks while
    the middle class gets doodly squat.

    Unless you're making over $300,000 a year, you're the fool. And even if
    you are, you obviously have no view toward the long range health of this
    nation.

    </OT Off>
    --
    Steve
    Bush fooled ya once, shame on him.
    If he fools ya twice, shame on you!
    (And look out, Nelly!)
  22. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    On Thu, 05 Aug 2004 21:27:46 GMT, Steve Caple
    <stevecaple@commoncast.net> wrote:

    >That was his second stint.

    Incorrect. There was one 4-month stint.
  23. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    John wrote:
    >>That was his second stint.
    >
    > Incorrect. There was one 4-month stint.

    I suggest you go to snopes.com:
    <http://www.snopes.com/politics/kerry/service.asp>

    He served in the Pacific on a DLG or other destroyer type vessel; something
    like 5 months; _requested_ Swift boat duty, and served in them 4 months
    getting shot at. Reportedly the wounds were minor, but at least he
    volunteered and was there getting shot at. I'll not judge anyone for
    getting several minor wounds - another inch one way or the other and
    those minor wounds can be fatal. I got mine looking at a 37mm shell
    explode 4 feet in front of me (in an H-3 over North Vietnam), and thanks to
    a flak vest and a demolished M-60 I had only scratches and small fragments
    in me, and thanks to pure luck my eyes were untouched. I could easily have
    been blind or dead, and likewise so could Kerry or any other of the
    thousands of us who got Purple Hearts for minor wounds.

    We were there and we were getting shot at and hit, even if relatively
    inconsequentially. Bush was not there, he wasn't even showing up at the
    Texas Country Club Air Force; Rumsfeld was not there. Cheney was doing his
    damnedest to make sure he didn't go there. Feith was not there. Wolfowitz
    was not there. Perle was not there. Limbaugh was not there. Hannity was
    not there. Richard Mellon Scaife was not there. Karl Rove was not there.

    I don't know if you were there or not, but if you were you're sure in
    strange company, making nicey-nicey with the same crowd of people too good
    to serve, people who ran a campaign calling Max Cleland unpatriotic because
    he wouldn't sign on to the idiot war fever that yet another slacker
    slimeball Saxby Chambliss was pumping people like you up with.

    You can go back to your perfervid dreams of Ann Coulter now.

    --
    Steve
    Bush fooled ya once, shame on him.
    If he fools ya twice, shame on you!
    (And look out, Nelly!)
  24. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    On Fri, 06 Aug 2004 04:59:27 GMT, Steve Caple
    <stevecaple@commoncast.net> wrote:

    >John wrote:
    >>>That was his second stint.
    >>
    >> Incorrect. There was one 4-month stint.
    >
    >I suggest you go to snopes.com:
    > <http://www.snopes.com/politics/kerry/service.asp>
    >
    >He served in the Pacific on a DLG or other destroyer type vessel; something
    >like 5 months; _requested_ Swift boat duty, and served in them 4 months
    >getting shot at.


    So, I am partially corrected. Still, one stint/tour. You can't
    expect Rush to feed me 100% correct info. :-) I'll get that from
    the Swift boat captain who wrote "Unfit To Command," when it
    comes out. Your snopes.com article was VERY anti-Kerry. Glad
    you weren't badly hurt. Yes, I certainly would like to do
    Coulter, but not as much as Margaret Carlson. In any case we
    don't belong on this forum.

    John
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