Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

!! Motherboards - a whole new territory !!

Tags:
  • Hewlett Packard
  • Hardware
  • Motherboards
  • Computers
Last response: in Computer Brands
Share
Anonymous
a b α HP
a b V Motherboard
May 9, 2004 3:51:15 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

So, how can I find out whether the motherboard supports the correct
voltage? Another News Group??

Er, and how do I find out what motherboard I have?!

Do I get the fire extinguisher ready if I take the gamble?

Regards, Marcus

More about : motherboards territory

Anonymous
a b α HP
a b V Motherboard
May 9, 2004 3:51:16 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

On Sat, 08 May 2004 23:51:15 +0100, Marcus Naraidoo
<marcus.naraidoo@definitive.f9.co.uk> wrote:

>So, how can I find out whether the motherboard supports the correct
>voltage? Another News Group??

You can find out which voltages the board supports either by reading HP
engineering specs (which won't be released), by trail-and-error, or by taking
advantage of the experience of someone else, successful or otherwise.

>
>Er, and how do I find out what motherboard I have?!

With HP systems, this is a problem. HP have never been very much forthcoming
about the manufacturer or model of its motherboards.
>
>Do I get the fire extinguisher ready if I take the gamble?

Yes, as a worst case... Ben Myers
>
>Regards, Marcus
>
Anonymous
a b α HP
a b V Motherboard
May 12, 2004 2:49:44 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

You were right.

HP doesn't make life easy. I have taken the following information from
the various things either stuck to, or printed on, the motherboard.

The board itself has HP5183-8014 etched onto the upper front left hand
edge. I've searched for this on the web. No joy.

The board has a sticker proclaiming that it's part number is
D6940-60001, although the HP web site said that it should be part number
D6940-69001. Confusion starts.

There is a bar code with the following number; S630UTQ0785E 4798 Made in
Mexico. This is located within a white outlined box etched onto the
board towards the centre.

I've looked for clues to all of these and the best I have come up with
is this.

This board is very very similar to an Intel NX440LX item, with the
exception that the Intel item has a NIC and sound built in and the HP
item does not. However the CPU, RAM and macro-layout are largely
identical. (The IO backplane is different though.) Additionally, the
Intel item appears to have been sold at the same time as my Vectra
VL6/400 Series 8. Is that a co-incidence?

Is there a chance that Intel manufactured the HP5183-8014 as OEM for HP?
I can't get more help from the Intel or HP websites and I'm running out
of routes to solve this problem.

Any pointers?

Best regards, Marcus
Related resources
May 12, 2004 2:49:45 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

"Marcus Naraidoo" <marcus.naraidoo@definitive.f9.co.uk> wrote in message
news:XTboc.2599$h87.1118@front-1.news.blueyonder.co.uk...
> You were right.
>
> HP doesn't make life easy. I have taken the following information from
> the various things either stuck to, or printed on, the motherboard.
>
> The board itself has HP5183-8014 etched onto the upper front left hand
> edge. I've searched for this on the web. No joy.
>
> The board has a sticker proclaiming that it's part number is
> D6940-60001, although the HP web site said that it should be part number
> D6940-69001. Confusion starts.
>
> There is a bar code with the following number; S630UTQ0785E 4798 Made in
> Mexico. This is located within a white outlined box etched onto the
> board towards the centre.
>
> I've looked for clues to all of these and the best I have come up with
> is this.
>
> This board is very very similar to an Intel NX440LX item, with the
> exception that the Intel item has a NIC and sound built in and the HP
> item does not. However the CPU, RAM and macro-layout are largely
> identical. (The IO backplane is different though.) Additionally, the
> Intel item appears to have been sold at the same time as my Vectra
> VL6/400 Series 8. Is that a co-incidence?
>
> Is there a chance that Intel manufactured the HP5183-8014 as OEM for HP?
> I can't get more help from the Intel or HP websites and I'm running out
> of routes to solve this problem.
>
> Any pointers?
>
> Best regards, Marcus


Things ain't so bad if you know the system.

HP will make a board with a part number on it for internal use only. They
track it for manufacturing and accounting purposes with this number.
The 5183-8014 might be that number or just the board with no parts
on it. Don't worry about it.

The D6940-60001 is the NEW "user" part number. It can be purchased
but will be very expensive since it is a new part. The parts system
will refer you to the rebuilt part number.

The D6940-69001 is the REBUILT part number that is available at
a "reasonable" price for purchase. The "69" numbers usually require the
return of the old (defective) part back to HP. This is the one you would
order if you wanted one.

The S630UTQ0785E 4798 might be a contractor number - don't know.

I also don't know about the Intel board.

Regards,
Mike
May 12, 2004 2:49:45 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

"Marcus Naraidoo" <marcus.naraidoo@definitive.f9.co.uk> wrote in message
news:XTboc.2599$h87.1118@front-1.news.blueyonder.co.uk...
> You were right.
>
> HP doesn't make life easy. I have taken the following information from
> the various things either stuck to, or printed on, the motherboard.
>
> The board itself has HP5183-8014 etched onto the upper front left hand
> edge. I've searched for this on the web. No joy.

> The board has a sticker proclaiming that it's part number is
> D6940-60001, although the HP web site said that it should be part number
> D6940-69001. Confusion starts.

Same basic board.

>
> There is a bar code with the following number; S630UTQ0785E 4798 Made in
> Mexico. This is located within a white outlined box etched onto the
> board towards the centre.
>
> I've looked for clues to all of these and the best I have come up with
> is this.
>
> This board is very very similar to an Intel NX440LX item, with the
> exception that the Intel item has a NIC and sound built in and the HP
> item does not. However the CPU, RAM and macro-layout are largely
> identical. (The IO backplane is different though.) Additionally, the
> Intel item appears to have been sold at the same time as my Vectra
> VL6/400 Series 8. Is that a co-incidence?
>
> Is there a chance that Intel manufactured the HP5183-8014 as OEM for HP?



> I can't get more help from the Intel or HP websites and I'm running out
> of routes to solve this problem.
>
> Any pointers?

Figure out which one of these you have

pIII 600
pIII 600E
pIII 600EB
pIII 600B


At one time, there was a page on the ASUS site that described the
differences between these processors. It was a useful reference for what you
are trying to do. Maybe you can find it. Perhaps you can find similar stuff
on the Intel site.


You can google on the code names to the PIII processor for more info.
( tualatin coppermine katmai )

Here is a German page with some comparison info (scroll down a bit)
http://de.shuttle.com/cpu_cumine.htm



>
> Best regards, Marcus
>
Anonymous
a b α HP
a b V Motherboard
May 12, 2004 6:25:45 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

The Vectras use boards from different manufacturers than the Pavilions and
Brios. The early Vectras were designed and built in France, which accounts for
the physical design being well outside the mainstream of personal computing, to
be kind about it.

The Intel NX440LX uses the 440LX chipset, whereas your board undoubtedly has an
Intel 440BX chipset. The 440LX is limited to 66MHz front side bus.

Regardless of the stickers on the board, or the absence thereof, Intel-designed
motherboards have a consistent scheme for identifying major system components
including sockets, jumper blocks, and connectors. The easiest way to
familiarize yourself with the scheme is to read an Intel spec and pay attention
to the identification of these parts. For example, a jumper block location is
typically identified in the format "anan", where the a's are alphabetic
characters and the n's numbers. So J6C1 might be a typical one. If your HP
board follows the same scheme, it may well have been made by Intel, who also
made the server motherboards for HP for a long time.

Because the Vectras are more expensive "business" computers, rather than the
Pavilion schlock, HP tended to use parts from better quality manufacturers.
Sorry, Pavilion owners, but that's the way it is. This group is unmoderated and
I don't have any secret police telling me what I can say or do... Ben Myers

On Tue, 11 May 2004 22:49:44 +0100, Marcus Naraidoo
<marcus.naraidoo@definitive.f9.co.uk> wrote:

>You were right.
>
>HP doesn't make life easy. I have taken the following information from
>the various things either stuck to, or printed on, the motherboard.
>
>The board itself has HP5183-8014 etched onto the upper front left hand
>edge. I've searched for this on the web. No joy.
>
>The board has a sticker proclaiming that it's part number is
>D6940-60001, although the HP web site said that it should be part number
>D6940-69001. Confusion starts.
>
>There is a bar code with the following number; S630UTQ0785E 4798 Made in
>Mexico. This is located within a white outlined box etched onto the
>board towards the centre.
>
>I've looked for clues to all of these and the best I have come up with
>is this.
>
>This board is very very similar to an Intel NX440LX item, with the
>exception that the Intel item has a NIC and sound built in and the HP
>item does not. However the CPU, RAM and macro-layout are largely
>identical. (The IO backplane is different though.) Additionally, the
>Intel item appears to have been sold at the same time as my Vectra
>VL6/400 Series 8. Is that a co-incidence?
>
>Is there a chance that Intel manufactured the HP5183-8014 as OEM for HP?
>I can't get more help from the Intel or HP websites and I'm running out
>of routes to solve this problem.
>
>Any pointers?
>
>Best regards, Marcus
>
Anonymous
a b α HP
a b V Motherboard
May 12, 2004 6:28:38 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

One more point. HP don't make life easy. Neither do the other major name brand
manufacturers: Dell, IBM, Gateway, eMachines (ugh!). All of them disguise the
original manufacturer of their motherboards, often with a company-wide BIOS
look-and-feel. But I know that a great many Dell boards are/were built by
Intel, as were Gateway's. IBM has used different mobo manufacturers, and I
haven't yet figured out who some the recent ones are. My guess is FoxConn.

.... Ben Myers

On Tue, 11 May 2004 22:49:44 +0100, Marcus Naraidoo
<marcus.naraidoo@definitive.f9.co.uk> wrote:

>You were right.
>
>HP doesn't make life easy. I have taken the following information from
>the various things either stuck to, or printed on, the motherboard.
>
>The board itself has HP5183-8014 etched onto the upper front left hand
>edge. I've searched for this on the web. No joy.
>
>The board has a sticker proclaiming that it's part number is
>D6940-60001, although the HP web site said that it should be part number
>D6940-69001. Confusion starts.
>
>There is a bar code with the following number; S630UTQ0785E 4798 Made in
>Mexico. This is located within a white outlined box etched onto the
>board towards the centre.
>
>I've looked for clues to all of these and the best I have come up with
>is this.
>
>This board is very very similar to an Intel NX440LX item, with the
>exception that the Intel item has a NIC and sound built in and the HP
>item does not. However the CPU, RAM and macro-layout are largely
>identical. (The IO backplane is different though.) Additionally, the
>Intel item appears to have been sold at the same time as my Vectra
>VL6/400 Series 8. Is that a co-incidence?
>
>Is there a chance that Intel manufactured the HP5183-8014 as OEM for HP?
>I can't get more help from the Intel or HP websites and I'm running out
>of routes to solve this problem.
>
>Any pointers?
>
>Best regards, Marcus
>
Anonymous
a b α HP
a b V Motherboard
May 12, 2004 10:28:49 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

eMachines!................ <gag> They make HP look good... I
recently saw stacks of Gateway machines for sale in Costco, so I think
that eMachines has indeed dragged Gateway down to their level ... It
is really too bad...

JM


On Wed, 12 May 2004 02:28:38 GMT, ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net
(Ben Myers) wrote:

>One more point. HP don't make life easy. Neither do the other major name brand
>manufacturers: Dell, IBM, Gateway, eMachines (ugh!). All of them disguise the
>original manufacturer of their motherboards, often with a company-wide BIOS
>look-and-feel. But I know that a great many Dell boards are/were built by
>Intel, as were Gateway's. IBM has used different mobo manufacturers, and I
>haven't yet figured out who some the recent ones are. My guess is FoxConn.
>
>... Ben Myers
Anonymous
a b α HP
a b V Motherboard
May 12, 2004 11:02:39 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

Gee, the secret police are not standing over you with their
billyclubs??????

<laughter>

On a different matter, awhile back there was a discussion about the
reduction in time that harddrives are warrantied for...

I recently did a deal of checking on harddrive warranties... Western
Digital is still "offering off the shelf" 3 year warranties on *some*
harddrives .. Specifically the SATA drives, and "bare" EIDE 7200rpm
harddrives with the 8mb cache (SE)... (these apparent same EIDE drives
in a retail box "kit" carry a 1 year warranty)...

Bare Drives:

Protégé & WD Caviar - 1-year
WD Caviar SE - 3-year
WD Raptor - 5-year

Retail Boxed:

Protégé & WD Caviar - 1-year
WD Caviar SE - 1-year
WD Raptor - 5-year
External Drives 1-year

Also, Western Digital has adopted a policy of the warranty begins at
manufacture date... So, if you purchase a retail boxed harddrive which
was manufactured 6 months ago, you only have a 6 month warranty..
Further, Western Digital will sell you additional warranty time on the
1 year warrantied units, as long as your initial warranty is still in
effect. Western Digital does not provide any warranty on units
purchased as a component of a pre-built computer (such as those in HP
computers), they expect the computer manufacturer to supply the
warranty (understandable)

Maxtor (ugh - too many premature failures imo....)

Bare drives:

Maxtor Fireball®, DiamondMax® ATA drives carry a Standard Warranty
Period of 1 year.

Maxtor DiamondMax Plus ATA drives that have an 8MB cache buffer AND
capacities of 120GB or greater carry a Standard Warranty Period of 3
years.

All other DiamondMax Plus drives carry a Standard Warranty Period of 1
year.

Maxtor MAXLine ATA drives carry a Standard Warranty Period of 3 years.

Maxtor Atlas® SCSI drives carry a Standard Warranty Period of 5 years.

Retail Boxed:

ATA kits - 1 year
SCSI kits - 5 years
external drives - 1 year

*******************************************
So, I think that buying new harddrives has definitely become a caveat
emptor situation, and confusing.. You really need to do your homework
then pick the best drive you can, and it would appear that buying bare
drives makes better sense warranty wise than buying boxed kits...

JM

On Wed, 12 May 2004 02:25:45 GMT, ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net
(Ben Myers) wrote:
<snip>
>Because the Vectras are more expensive "business" computers, rather than the
>Pavilion schlock, HP tended to use parts from better quality manufacturers.
>Sorry, Pavilion owners, but that's the way it is. This group is unmoderated and
>I don't have any secret police telling me what I can say or do... Ben Myers
Anonymous
a b α HP
a b V Motherboard
May 13, 2004 1:07:25 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

AFAIK, WD and other drive manufacturers have always started the warranty clock
ticking on the date of manufacture... Ben

On Wed, 12 May 2004 19:02:39 GMT, Just mee <me@mydomain.net.invalid> wrote:

>Gee, the secret police are not standing over you with their
>billyclubs??????
>
><laughter>
>
>On a different matter, awhile back there was a discussion about the
>reduction in time that harddrives are warrantied for...
>
>I recently did a deal of checking on harddrive warranties... Western
>Digital is still "offering off the shelf" 3 year warranties on *some*
>harddrives .. Specifically the SATA drives, and "bare" EIDE 7200rpm
>harddrives with the 8mb cache (SE)... (these apparent same EIDE drives
>in a retail box "kit" carry a 1 year warranty)...
>
>Bare Drives:
>
>Protégé & WD Caviar - 1-year
>WD Caviar SE - 3-year
>WD Raptor - 5-year
>
>Retail Boxed:
>
>Protégé & WD Caviar - 1-year
>WD Caviar SE - 1-year
>WD Raptor - 5-year
>External Drives 1-year
>
>Also, Western Digital has adopted a policy of the warranty begins at
>manufacture date... So, if you purchase a retail boxed harddrive which
>was manufactured 6 months ago, you only have a 6 month warranty..
>Further, Western Digital will sell you additional warranty time on the
>1 year warrantied units, as long as your initial warranty is still in
>effect. Western Digital does not provide any warranty on units
>purchased as a component of a pre-built computer (such as those in HP
>computers), they expect the computer manufacturer to supply the
>warranty (understandable)
>
>Maxtor (ugh - too many premature failures imo....)
>
>Bare drives:
>
>Maxtor Fireball®, DiamondMax® ATA drives carry a Standard Warranty
>Period of 1 year.
>
>Maxtor DiamondMax Plus ATA drives that have an 8MB cache buffer AND
>capacities of 120GB or greater carry a Standard Warranty Period of 3
>years.
>
>All other DiamondMax Plus drives carry a Standard Warranty Period of 1
>year.
>
>Maxtor MAXLine ATA drives carry a Standard Warranty Period of 3 years.
>
>Maxtor Atlas® SCSI drives carry a Standard Warranty Period of 5 years.
>
>Retail Boxed:
>
>ATA kits - 1 year
>SCSI kits - 5 years
>external drives - 1 year
>
>*******************************************
>So, I think that buying new harddrives has definitely become a caveat
>emptor situation, and confusing.. You really need to do your homework
>then pick the best drive you can, and it would appear that buying bare
>drives makes better sense warranty wise than buying boxed kits...
>
>JM
>
>On Wed, 12 May 2004 02:25:45 GMT, ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net
>(Ben Myers) wrote:
><snip>
>>Because the Vectras are more expensive "business" computers, rather than the
>>Pavilion schlock, HP tended to use parts from better quality manufacturers.
>>Sorry, Pavilion owners, but that's the way it is. This group is unmoderated and
>>I don't have any secret police telling me what I can say or do... Ben Myers
>
Anonymous
a b α HP
a b V Motherboard
May 13, 2004 7:03:25 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

<ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
news:40a291e5.4361824@news.charter.net...

> AFAIK, WD and other drive manufacturers have always started the warranty
> clock
> ticking on the date of manufacture... Ben

That's normally only if you can't prove that you purchased it from an
authorized reseller at a later date.

DS
Anonymous
a b α HP
a b V Motherboard
May 13, 2004 6:35:50 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

There you go then. As a rule, I have not bought many drives from authorized
resellers. The drives usually turn up here in a failed or failing state in
client's computer systems. And the drives were usually bought originally from
an authorized reseller well down the food chain... Ben Myers

On Thu, 13 May 2004 03:03:25 -0700, "David Schwartz" <davids@webmaster.com>
wrote:

>
><ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
>news:40a291e5.4361824@news.charter.net...
>
>> AFAIK, WD and other drive manufacturers have always started the warranty
>> clock
>> ticking on the date of manufacture... Ben
>
> That's normally only if you can't prove that you purchased it from an
>authorized reseller at a later date.
>
> DS
>
>
!