Does weather effect Wifi in the home ?

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

Just wondering...
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More about does weather effect wifi home
  1. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    "Meatwad" <hn195@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:2nd01rFv7ctuU1@uni-berlin.de...
    > Just wondering...
    >
    No, but it may affect it. HTH.

    --
    frosty
  2. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    No.
    Range is short, 2.4Ghz frequencies quite high and radio transmission uses
    digital spread spectrum. Even if a glitch can get through because of a *big*
    lithning close by, the packet will be retransmitted, you won't notice a
    difference. (Unless the lightning blows up your system :)
    2.4GhZ cordless phone and microwave ovens are more effective interference
    generators.

    Moist

    "Meatwad" <hn195@hotmail.com> a écrit dans le message de
    news:2nd01rFv7ctuU1@uni-berlin.de...
    > Just wondering...
    >
    >
  3. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    In message <z_bQc.1375$T5.75411@weber.videotron.net>, Moist
    <moist@msn.com> writes
    >No.
    >Range is short, 2.4Ghz frequencies quite high and radio transmission uses
    >digital spread spectrum. Even if a glitch can get through because of a *big*
    >lithning close by, the packet will be retransmitted, you won't notice a
    >difference. (Unless the lightning blows up your system :)
    >2.4GhZ cordless phone and microwave ovens are more effective interference
    >generators.

    I would have said the same, but today there was a thunderstorm around
    here, and the wifi connection to my laptop failed only once, just at the
    time that there was a loud thunderclap. From the flash-sound interval
    it wasn't all that close, maybe 1 km away, but clearly it generated
    enough white noise all over the RF band to stop my wifi connection
    working for a second or two. I had to reopen the connections, and
    things were ok afterwards.

    --
    Clive Page
  4. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    "Clive Page" <junk@page.demon.co.uk> a écrit dans le message de
    news:JYJwQzAEXVEBJw2m@page.demon.co.uk...
    > In message <z_bQc.1375$T5.75411@weber.videotron.net>, Moist
    > <moist@msn.com> writes
    > >No.
    > >Range is short, 2.4Ghz frequencies quite high and radio transmission uses
    > >digital spread spectrum. Even if a glitch can get through because of a
    *big*
    > >lithning close by, the packet will be retransmitted, you won't notice a
    > >difference. (Unless the lightning blows up your system :)
    > >2.4GhZ cordless phone and microwave ovens are more effective interference
    > >generators.
    >
    > I would have said the same, but today there was a thunderstorm around
    > here, and the wifi connection to my laptop failed only once, just at the
    > time that there was a loud thunderclap. From the flash-sound interval
    > it wasn't all that close, maybe 1 km away, but clearly it generated
    > enough white noise all over the RF band to stop my wifi connection
    > working for a second or two. I had to reopen the connections, and
    > things were ok afterwards.
    >
    > --
    > Clive Page

    Interesting!
    The interference was bad enough to interrupt our connection. Mmmmh!
    Did you get other WiFi interruptions during that period? I assume it was
    not the only lightning during that period.
    And what was the distance between your access point and your laptop?

    I may have given a incorrect answer to the first post afterall :(

    Moist
  5. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    I have the same feeling than Clive.

    In summer, flow are higher and ping are less large because of the moisture
    of the air :(
    moreover, wind a un big effect because that made tremble the antennas :(

    ok, I must improve my English ;)

    have fun
    Thomas (FR)

    "Clive Page" <junk@page.demon.co.uk> a écrit dans le message de news:
    JYJwQzAEXVEBJw2m@page.demon.co.uk...
    > In message <z_bQc.1375$T5.75411@weber.videotron.net>, Moist
    > <moist@msn.com> writes
    > >No.
    > >Range is short, 2.4Ghz frequencies quite high and radio transmission uses
    > >digital spread spectrum. Even if a glitch can get through because of a
    *big*
    > >lithning close by, the packet will be retransmitted, you won't notice a
    > >difference. (Unless the lightning blows up your system :)
    > >2.4GhZ cordless phone and microwave ovens are more effective interference
    > >generators.
    >
    > I would have said the same, but today there was a thunderstorm around
    > here, and the wifi connection to my laptop failed only once, just at the
    > time that there was a loud thunderclap. From the flash-sound interval
    > it wasn't all that close, maybe 1 km away, but clearly it generated
    > enough white noise all over the RF band to stop my wifi connection
    > working for a second or two. I had to reopen the connections, and
    > things were ok afterwards.
    >
    > --
    > Clive Page
  6. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    "Thoomas" <gassilloud@hotmail.com> wrote in news:41115a1d$0$15275
    $636a15ce@news.free.fr:

    > moreover, wind a un big effect because that made tremble the antennas :(

    If wind is making the antennas in your home tremble, you need to move. Or
    close the windows.

    --
    Minister of All Things Digital & Electronic, and Holder of Past Knowledge
    stile99@email.com. Cabal# 24601-fnord | Sleep is irrelevant.
    I speak for no one but myself, and |Caffeine will be assimilated.
    no one else speaks for me. O- | Decaf is futile.
  7. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    My 802.11b outdoor camera seems to have no problem, even in severe
    thunderstorms, as long as the power stays on. Its about 125' from an
    18DBi directional antenna in my attic.

    Meatwad wrote:
    > Just wondering...
    >
    >
  8. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Yes it can, massive farting inside a house has been known
    to effect Wifi.
  9. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    In message <AgdQc.157$_i5.7391@wagner.videotron.net>, Moist
    <moist@msn.com> writes
    >The interference was bad enough to interrupt our connection. Mmmmh!
    >Did you get other WiFi interruptions during that period? I assume it was
    >not the only lightning during that period.

    I only got one interruption that I noticed that day, but not much
    thunder either.

    But yesterday there was again a thunderstorm not far away. My ssh
    connection to a machine at work dropped, and I wondered if that was
    again the storm as it had got quite dark: and then about 5 seconds
    later I heard a moderately loud roll of thunder. I did not see the
    flash, but guess that the it had roughly coincided with the loss of
    signal (5 secs = 1 mile in old money, 1.6 km). So that's two cases. I
    think that's more than a coincidence. Lightning clearly causes
    interference to radio and TV signals across all bands, so it's not
    surprising that it should interrupt wifi also.

    >And what was the distance between your access point and your laptop?

    I was at the far end of the house, through a couple of walls from the
    access point. Signal strength is usually "low", but I mostly get full
    bandwidth of 11 Mb/s.


    --
    Clive Page
  10. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    No not reaaly chance of wheather effecting Wifi in home is 1/1000

    ramsey
    www.a2bcomputers.com
    "Meatwad" <hn195@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:2nd01rFv7ctuU1@uni-berlin.de...
    > Just wondering...
    >
    >
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