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Recomemdations please

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May 15, 2004 6:29:16 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

I am looking for recommendations for 3 to 4 phones that I need. I am
currently with ATT with 3 phones and need to add a 4th phone. Before I buy
another phone I would like to check this out.

What are the current good phones offered for Verizon--good voice quality,
battery life, ease of use are primary concerns. Thanks.

More about : recomemdations

Anonymous
May 15, 2004 6:29:17 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

Vijay wrote:
> What are the current good phones offered for Verizon--good voice quality,
> battery life, ease of use are primary concerns. Thanks.

Don't touch anything by Audiovox. The LG phones tend to be the least
worst. Read the archives for this group if particular features matter
to you (eg camera, bluetooth, international travel etc) where they
have all been discussed multiple times.

Roger
Anonymous
May 15, 2004 1:45:12 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

Roger Binns wrote:
> Vijay wrote:
>
>>What are the current good phones offered for Verizon--good voice quality,
>>battery life, ease of use are primary concerns. Thanks.
>
>
> Don't touch anything by Audiovox. The LG phones tend to be the least
> worst. Read the archives for this group if particular features matter
> to you (eg camera, bluetooth, international travel etc) where they
> have all been discussed multiple times.
>
> Roger
>
>
I'd have to second that one. We just got 4 audiovox 8900's from VZW and
found out that:

1. There's no way to download pics directly to your computer
2. The USB port is useless because the internal software is so fragile
that even trivial operations can render the phone inoperable

see: http://bitpim.sourceforge.net/testhelp/

It seems that VZW has done something to the software to cripple the
ability to communicate with your PC. This means that all operations
must be conducted through their web site, which entails more charges
that they don't make clear to you upfront. Of equal concern is the loss
of privacy involved in trusting that 3rd party site with your pictures,
phone book and other information transferred to and from your phone.

In addition, the phones don't work in many places where our previous
analog AT&T phones had no problems at all.

If we had it to do over again, we'd be looking at different phones, and
probably a different carrier too.
Related resources
Anonymous
May 15, 2004 6:02:36 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

my 8900 has only dropped one call in over 50 hours of talk time. Also my
data cable and curel drivers work great. i can download as much as i want
from the camera and put it on my computer. Everytime i fill up my camera
memory i plug it in and download them using bitpim and curel drivers.

Howver it will not upload ringers, which is no big deal for me as i like the
ringers it has.

brian s.

"FrankH" <frank@med-%nospam%-zilla.com> wrote in message
news:1084639302.678894@nnrp2.phx1.gblx.net...
> Roger Binns wrote:
> > Vijay wrote:
> >
> >>What are the current good phones offered for Verizon--good voice
quality,
> >>battery life, ease of use are primary concerns. Thanks.
> >
> >
> > Don't touch anything by Audiovox. The LG phones tend to be the least
> > worst. Read the archives for this group if particular features matter
> > to you (eg camera, bluetooth, international travel etc) where they
> > have all been discussed multiple times.
> >
> > Roger
> >
> >
> I'd have to second that one. We just got 4 audiovox 8900's from VZW and
> found out that:
>
> 1. There's no way to download pics directly to your computer
> 2. The USB port is useless because the internal software is so fragile
> that even trivial operations can render the phone inoperable
>
> see: http://bitpim.sourceforge.net/testhelp/
>
> It seems that VZW has done something to the software to cripple the
> ability to communicate with your PC. This means that all operations
> must be conducted through their web site, which entails more charges
> that they don't make clear to you upfront. Of equal concern is the loss
> of privacy involved in trusting that 3rd party site with your pictures,
> phone book and other information transferred to and from your phone.
>
> In addition, the phones don't work in many places where our previous
> analog AT&T phones had no problems at all.
>
> If we had it to do over again, we'd be looking at different phones, and
> probably a different carrier too.
Anonymous
May 15, 2004 7:34:58 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

> 1. There's no way to download pics directly to your computer

That is officially true of all phones Verizon sells. However
the phones usually have some means of at least accessing the
phonebook over a cable. This is supported to varying degrees
by 3rd party software.

> 2. The USB port is useless

You can use it as a modem, like all phones using Qualcomm
chipsets.

> because the internal software is so fragile
> that even trivial operations can render the phone inoperable

BTW I am the author of BitPim and have the 2nd dead CDM8900 on my
desk (and returned a Thera a few months ago).

The problem is that all these phones have software that runs
inside them. That software implements the phone's housekeeping,
functionality, sync protocols etc. The internal software in
the CDM8900 is the worst I have every come across, and it is
trivial to crash the phone, and have it unable to even boot.
For example I most recently did this by changing the group
a phonebook entry is a member of on the phone itself. Ask
any programmers how they would write code that on doing that
would lock up a device, and then prevent it from ever booting
again. Additionally the screen may be substandard. I left
a previously locked up phone on for about 10 minutes to see if
the software would recover. The screen ended up burnt in
really badly (ie completely unusable).

(The functionality on the phone was also below par. For example
phonebook entries are limited to 16 characters each, you only
have 6 groups and it will only let you rename 3 of those, you
can't store two types of the same number for people such as
two work numbers or two home numbers, the voice dials don't
link directly to the phonebook and have to be seperately
maintained, the design of the phonebook didn't have a
few simple feautures which would make syncing easier etc etc).

For a previous Audiovox product, the Thera I found similar
issues. They had taken a pre-release version of a Sierra
Wireless cellular modem and frigged it, done something similar
with the SW software, and then made a bastardised version
of PocketPC, instead of using PocketPC Phone Edition. The
resulting device can never be upgraded, and no standard PocketPC
Phone Edition programs can work with, nor can you write anything
since the SW SDK will not work due to the cellular modem and
software being frigged.

Taking a step back, you will realise why this is. Audiovox is
more of a marketing company than a products company. They spot
market opportunities, source a product from somewhere else, do the
minimum necesary to make it look good on paper and then sell
it. They don't have an incentive to worry about the long term
life of their products, and to be early in the market they don't
have an incentive to do a thorough and deep job on accompanying
bits like internal software.

The funny thing is that the CDM8900 and LG VX6000 actually have the
same circuit board, designed by Curitel. LG went ahead and put
decent software inside. Audiovox just used whatever Curitel
had. Despite that, LG beat Audiovox to market by several
months. (Audiovox also included analog which may have
contributed to the delay).

> It seems that VZW has done something to the software to cripple the
> ability to communicate with your PC.

VZW had nothing to do with it. The cell phone manufacturers
are hardware people. Internal software on the devices is
just a time and cost centre to them. They get the CDMA phoneset
chips from Qualcomm, slap together the reference software and
their own "value adds" and release it. VZW doesn't mind this
as most Qualcomm chipsets in that Brew nonsense so they can
sell apps to do the ringtones etc that way.

> If we had it to do over again, we'd be looking at different phones, and
> probably a different carrier too.

The general consensus is that Verizon has the best overall coverage,
although there will be many locations where a seperate carrier has
better coverage. The phones Verizon offers are a mixed bag. For
some bizarre reason they shy away from features not directly related
to running a phone such as BlueTooth.

Roger
May 15, 2004 9:59:45 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

"FrankH" <frank@med-%nospam%-zilla.com> wrote in message
news:1084639302.678894@nnrp2.phx1.gblx.net...
> Roger Binns wrote:
> > Vijay wrote:
> >
> >>What are the current good phones offered for Verizon--good voice
quality,
> >>battery life, ease of use are primary concerns. Thanks.
> >
> >
> > Don't touch anything by Audiovox. The LG phones tend to be the least
> > worst. Read the archives for this group if particular features matter
> > to you (eg camera, bluetooth, international travel etc) where they
> > have all been discussed multiple times.
> >
> > Roger
> >
> >
> I'd have to second that one. We just got 4 audiovox 8900's from VZW and
> found out that:
>
> 1. There's no way to download pics directly to your computer
> 2. The USB port is useless because the internal software is so fragile
> that even trivial operations can render the phone inoperable
>
> see: http://bitpim.sourceforge.net/testhelp/
>
> It seems that VZW has done something to the software to cripple the
> ability to communicate with your PC. This means that all operations
> must be conducted through their web site, which entails more charges
> that they don't make clear to you upfront. Of equal concern is the loss
> of privacy involved in trusting that 3rd party site with your pictures,
> phone book and other information transferred to and from your phone.
>
> In addition, the phones don't work in many places where our previous
> analog AT&T phones had no problems at all.
>
> If we had it to do over again, we'd be looking at different phones, and
> probably a different carrier too.

Which different phone? Which differnt carrier? Currently my ATT GSM
(Siemens S46)works great in Sunnyvale, but my daughter's TDMA (Nokia 33xx?)
performance in San Diego is going downhill.
Anonymous
May 16, 2004 6:11:42 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

Thanks Roger.

Perhaps your words will deter future buyers of these poorly programmed
VZW phones.

It's probably too much to hope for that VZW will see how these errors
are damaging their otherwise fine reputation, and take steps to provide
higher quality, consumer friendly software

FrankH

Roger Binns wrote:
>>1. There's no way to download pics directly to your computer
>
>
> That is officially true of all phones Verizon sells. However
> the phones usually have some means of at least accessing the
> phonebook over a cable. This is supported to varying degrees
> by 3rd party software.
>
>
>>2. The USB port is useless
>
>
> You can use it as a modem, like all phones using Qualcomm
> chipsets.
>
>
>>because the internal software is so fragile
>>that even trivial operations can render the phone inoperable
>
>
> BTW I am the author of BitPim and have the 2nd dead CDM8900 on my
> desk (and returned a Thera a few months ago).
>
> The problem is that all these phones have software that runs
> inside them. That software implements the phone's housekeeping,
> functionality, sync protocols etc. The internal software in
> the CDM8900 is the worst I have every come across, and it is
> trivial to crash the phone, and have it unable to even boot.
> For example I most recently did this by changing the group
> a phonebook entry is a member of on the phone itself. Ask
> any programmers how they would write code that on doing that
> would lock up a device, and then prevent it from ever booting
> again. Additionally the screen may be substandard. I left
> a previously locked up phone on for about 10 minutes to see if
> the software would recover. The screen ended up burnt in
> really badly (ie completely unusable).
>
> (The functionality on the phone was also below par. For example
> phonebook entries are limited to 16 characters each, you only
> have 6 groups and it will only let you rename 3 of those, you
> can't store two types of the same number for people such as
> two work numbers or two home numbers, the voice dials don't
> link directly to the phonebook and have to be seperately
> maintained, the design of the phonebook didn't have a
> few simple feautures which would make syncing easier etc etc).
>
> For a previous Audiovox product, the Thera I found similar
> issues. They had taken a pre-release version of a Sierra
> Wireless cellular modem and frigged it, done something similar
> with the SW software, and then made a bastardised version
> of PocketPC, instead of using PocketPC Phone Edition. The
> resulting device can never be upgraded, and no standard PocketPC
> Phone Edition programs can work with, nor can you write anything
> since the SW SDK will not work due to the cellular modem and
> software being frigged.
>
> Taking a step back, you will realise why this is. Audiovox is
> more of a marketing company than a products company. They spot
> market opportunities, source a product from somewhere else, do the
> minimum necesary to make it look good on paper and then sell
> it. They don't have an incentive to worry about the long term
> life of their products, and to be early in the market they don't
> have an incentive to do a thorough and deep job on accompanying
> bits like internal software.
>
> The funny thing is that the CDM8900 and LG VX6000 actually have the
> same circuit board, designed by Curitel. LG went ahead and put
> decent software inside. Audiovox just used whatever Curitel
> had. Despite that, LG beat Audiovox to market by several
> months. (Audiovox also included analog which may have
> contributed to the delay).
>
>
>>It seems that VZW has done something to the software to cripple the
>>ability to communicate with your PC.
>
>
> VZW had nothing to do with it. The cell phone manufacturers
> are hardware people. Internal software on the devices is
> just a time and cost centre to them. They get the CDMA phoneset
> chips from Qualcomm, slap together the reference software and
> their own "value adds" and release it. VZW doesn't mind this
> as most Qualcomm chipsets in that Brew nonsense so they can
> sell apps to do the ringtones etc that way.
>
>
>>If we had it to do over again, we'd be looking at different phones, and
>>probably a different carrier too.
>
>
> The general consensus is that Verizon has the best overall coverage,
> although there will be many locations where a seperate carrier has
> better coverage. The phones Verizon offers are a mixed bag. For
> some bizarre reason they shy away from features not directly related
> to running a phone such as BlueTooth.
>
> Roger
>
>
Anonymous
May 17, 2004 7:23:37 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

"Roger Binns" <rogerb@rogerbinns.com> wrote in message news:<fhiin1-mlb.ln1@home.rogerbinns.com>...
> > 1. There's no way to download pics directly to your computer
>
> That is officially true of all phones Verizon sells. However
> the phones usually have some means of at least accessing the
> phonebook over a cable. This is supported to varying degrees
> by 3rd party software.
>
> > 2. The USB port is useless
>
> You can use it as a modem, like all phones using Qualcomm
> chipsets.
>
> > because the internal software is so fragile
> > that even trivial operations can render the phone inoperable
>
> BTW I am the author of BitPim and have the 2nd dead CDM8900 on my
> desk (and returned a Thera a few months ago).
>
> The problem is that all these phones have software that runs
> inside them. That software implements the phone's housekeeping,
> functionality, sync protocols etc. The internal software in
> the CDM8900 is the worst I have every come across, and it is
> trivial to crash the phone, and have it unable to even boot.
> For example I most recently did this by changing the group
> a phonebook entry is a member of on the phone itself. Ask
> any programmers how they would write code that on doing that
> would lock up a device, and then prevent it from ever booting
> again. Additionally the screen may be substandard. I left
> a previously locked up phone on for about 10 minutes to see if
> the software would recover. The screen ended up burnt in
> really badly (ie completely unusable).
>
> (The functionality on the phone was also below par. For example
> phonebook entries are limited to 16 characters each, you only
> have 6 groups and it will only let you rename 3 of those, you
> can't store two types of the same number for people such as
> two work numbers or two home numbers, the voice dials don't
> link directly to the phonebook and have to be seperately
> maintained, the design of the phonebook didn't have a
> few simple feautures which would make syncing easier etc etc).
>
> For a previous Audiovox product, the Thera I found similar
> issues. They had taken a pre-release version of a Sierra
> Wireless cellular modem and frigged it, done something similar
> with the SW software, and then made a bastardised version
> of PocketPC, instead of using PocketPC Phone Edition. The
> resulting device can never be upgraded, and no standard PocketPC
> Phone Edition programs can work with, nor can you write anything
> since the SW SDK will not work due to the cellular modem and
> software being frigged.
>
> Taking a step back, you will realise why this is. Audiovox is
> more of a marketing company than a products company. They spot
> market opportunities, source a product from somewhere else, do the
> minimum necesary to make it look good on paper and then sell
> it. They don't have an incentive to worry about the long term
> life of their products, and to be early in the market they don't
> have an incentive to do a thorough and deep job on accompanying
> bits like internal software.
>
> The funny thing is that the CDM8900 and LG VX6000 actually have the
> same circuit board, designed by Curitel. LG went ahead and put
> decent software inside. Audiovox just used whatever Curitel
> had. Despite that, LG beat Audiovox to market by several
> months. (Audiovox also included analog which may have
> contributed to the delay).
>
> > It seems that VZW has done something to the software to cripple the
> > ability to communicate with your PC.
>
> VZW had nothing to do with it. The cell phone manufacturers
> are hardware people. Internal software on the devices is
> just a time and cost centre to them. They get the CDMA phoneset
> chips from Qualcomm, slap together the reference software and
> their own "value adds" and release it. VZW doesn't mind this
> as most Qualcomm chipsets in that Brew nonsense so they can
> sell apps to do the ringtones etc that way.
>
> Roger


The Audiovox handset division is up for sale, see below.

The last Nokia (3595i), may have the best digital reception of ANY
Verzion phone. The Nokia's ability to rapidly aquire a usable digital
signal/network, is a cut a above. Their use of Texas Instruments chips
may be one reason for improved performance. Keep your eyes out for the
next Nokia that Verizon releases. If Nokia can put that great digital
signal performance, into a professional looking flip exterior....they
could have a big winner!

I'd agree the current crop of Audiovox's, (and many others) may not be
the best picks. I'd wait just a little longer. There are going to be a
lot of new releases... soon. Eventually, there's got to be a standout
(like the LG 4400)!

Verizon propriatary handset features, designed to create more kinds of
additional pay services, are the driving force behind new handset
releases.

Not all the Audiovox's are "bad" but every phone does have a mix of
strengths and flaws.
For example, there are some stand out features on the Audiovox 9500,
besides a few faults...

Well built in Japan, by Toshiba.
Has the best analog reception of any Verizon phone.
Can be hard wired to even better antennas, for max reception.
Very large, bright, clear, easy to read, color display.
Holds 100 voicedial locations, requiring only ONE headset button
press, to make a call.
Can access Sprint/PCS carriers through a direct "channel number
entry" (in debug menu).
300 locations, having 80 digit, numeric string capacity.
3x300 locations, holding 48 digit characters for notes or email
addresses.
Caller ID ringtones for 1500 locations.

Just depends upon what one values, for their particular handset usage
needs.

BTW Roger, thanks for Bitpim!

-
David

*******************************************************

Audiovox is selling their handset division...


UTStarcom Pushing Audiovox Handset Bid
By Scott Moritz
TheStreet.com
4/30/2004

"UTStarcom (UTSI:Nasdaq - news - research) is battling with South
Korea's Curitel over the cell-phone division of Audiovox (VOXX:Nasdaq
- news - research) , according to people familiar with the talks.
No terms of the discussions were available, but the back-and-forth
heated up in recent weeks after UTStarcom put a bigger bid on the
table. Analysts estimate that the handset business -- known as
Audiovox Communications -- could fetch as much as $200 million. There
is also a chance that other bids may be tendered or that both suitors
could walk away from a deal.
Representatives of Hauppauge, N.Y.-based Audiovox and Alameda,
Calif.-based UTStarcom declined to comment.
UTStarcom, which has had success selling systems for portable
local phone service in China, has been looking to expand into other
areas of wireless technology. Industry observers say the Audiovox deal
would give UTStarcom an immediate entry into the hot code division
multiple access, or CDMA, cell-phone market.
Audiovox's handset unit, which is 25% owned by Toshiba, sells phones
to outfits such as Sprint (FON:NYSE - news - research) and Verizon
Wireless, which is a joint venture of Verizon (VZ:NYSE - news -
research) and Vodafone (VOD:NYSE - news - research) .
Audiovox put the cell-phone business on the block in February, after
it entered a nonbinding agreement to sell the unit to Curitel for an
undisclosed amount. Audiovox then hired Jefferies & Co. to find a
higher bid.
Word that UTStarcom was exploring the purchase of the Audiovox handset
division was first reported in TheStreet.com's Tech Edge newsletter on
March 16.
Audiovox distributes phones made by Toshiba and Curitel in the U.S.
under the Audiovox name. Industry watchers say Audiovox offers a
complete handset operation, from supply to distribution. Most
important, it boasts a direct relationship with Verizon Wireless, the
nation's largest cell-phone service.
Analysts note that margins on phone distribution are thin, and the
handset operation would make more sense as part of a larger phone
business. Audiovox could cash out on the sales at a time when
cell-phone sales are reaching record-high levels, allowing the company
to focus on its remaining electronics division, which includes a
growing portable DVD player business.


While both Curitel and UTStarcom make their own handsets and could try
to distribute directly to big telcos such as Verizon, industry experts
say the long initial engagement-and-testing process makes that path
perilous.
The relationship between the handset supplier and carrier is valuable.
"It takes a lot of time and effort to build the phone testing and
approval process," says Charter Equity Research analyst Ed Snyder. He
says big players such as Verizon Wireless don't necessarily have time
to start from scratch with a new vendor. "If you don't have access,
you can certainly buy it," says Snyder, who has no rating on Audiovox
or UTStarcom.
UTStarcom makes personal wireless access system, or PAS, networks
that effectively substitute limited-range portable phones for
wire-line local phone-and-Internet service. This lower-cost system has
provided an alternative communication network in areas where there has
been limited phone network infrastructure. UTStarcom gained a loyal
following last year as investors cheered its success in finding a
niche in markets such as China, where it has 45 million subscribers.
But analysts say UTStarcom's growth potential will be limited as
conventional wireless services get cheaper and more widespread.
UTStarcom has been searching for ways to diversify its business.
Last week, for example, UTStarcom agreed to buy Telos, a
Vancover-based CDMA networking gearmaker, for $29 million. The deal
will help UTStarcom expand its infrastructure product offering and
allow it to better compete with large players such as Lucent (LU:NYSE
- news - research) , Nortel (NT:NYSE - news - research) and Motorola
(MOT:NYSE - news - research) in the network-equipment market.
Curitel is South Korea's No. 3 cell-phone maker, behind Samsung and
LG. The company has informally approached Verizon Wireless with the
prospect of setting up a direct distribution arrangement that could
start up early next year, said one person familiar with the two
companies.
For the most recent quarter ended in February, Audiovox's handset unit
posted a profit of $1.9 million on $240 million in revenue. The
revenue number marked an 11% jump from the same period a year ago. The
top-line growth came from the popularity of some of its color camera
phones that were introduced in the second half of last year."
Anonymous
May 17, 2004 6:13:51 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

David L wrote:
> Not all the Audiovox's are "bad" but every phone does have a mix of
> strengths and flaws.
> For example, there are some stand out features on the Audiovox 9500,
> besides a few faults...

Their phones always look ok on paper :-) That is the point.

> Well built in Japan, by Toshiba.

Yes, but the internal phone software has to be written and
customised for the US. It is that internal software and
Audiovox's track record I have the biggest issue with.

> Just depends upon what one values, for their particular handset usage
> needs.

The other things you listed are the same (and in fact often worse) than
other phones. I note there is no listing of the maximum length of a
name, any internal data structures to make synchronization easier,
how many groups there are and how many can be editted etc.

> BTW Roger, thanks for Bitpim!

You are welcome!

> Analysts note that margins on phone distribution are thin,

Which is sadly why the cell phone companies spend so little
on the internal software, interaction design and other
things which make out lives as users better.

> For the most recent quarter ended in February, Audiovox's handset unit
> posted a profit of $1.9 million on $240 million in revenue.

That is a pretty pitiful profit!

Roger
Anonymous
May 19, 2004 7:24:43 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

On Sat, 15 May 2004 15:34:58 -0700, "Roger Binns" <rogerb@rogerbinns.com>
chose to add this to the great equation of life, the universe, and
everything:

>For a previous Audiovox product, the Thera I found similar
>issues. They had taken a pre-release version of a Sierra
>Wireless cellular modem and frigged it, done something similar
>with the SW software, and then made a bastardised version
>of PocketPC, instead of using PocketPC Phone Edition. The
>resulting device can never be upgraded, and no standard PocketPC
>Phone Edition programs can work with, nor can you write anything
>since the SW SDK will not work due to the cellular modem and
>software being frigged.

Thanks, Roger. I live just a few miles from the TigerDirect outlet store
and I was getting pretty tempted by that Thera. (Of course, now that I have
a laptop, I really have no need for a PDA.)

--
David Streeter, "an internet god" -- Dave Barry
http://home.att.net/~dwstreeter
Remove the naughty bit from my address to reply
Expect a train on ANY track at ANY time.
"t's a big world, and there are many more adventures awaiting us, out
there on the vastness of the ocean. For example, we have yet to try the
shrimp scampi." - Dave Barry
Anonymous
June 24, 2004 8:18:02 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

[posted to group and emailed]

On Sat, 15 May 2004 15:34:58 -0700, "Roger Binns" <rogerb@rogerbinns.com>
chose to add this to the great equation of life, the universe, and
everything:

>For a previous Audiovox product, the Thera I found similar
>issues. They had taken a pre-release version of a Sierra
>Wireless cellular modem and frigged it, done something similar
>with the SW software, and then made a bastardised version
>of PocketPC, instead of using PocketPC Phone Edition. The
>resulting device can never be upgraded, and no standard PocketPC
>Phone Edition programs can work with, nor can you write anything
>since the SW SDK will not work due to the cellular modem and
>software being frigged.

Is a Thera worth buying for $75? I walked into the Tiger Direct outlet
store today and they had 3 of them, all open boxes (but 2 with plastic
straps so people wouldn't paw through them), for that price. The one that
was open appeared to have everything in it.

Thanks,

--
David Streeter, "an internet god" -- Dave Barry
http://home.att.net/~dwstreeter
Remove the naughty bit from my address to reply
Expect a train on ANY track at ANY time.
"One of the symptoms of an approaching nervous breakdown is the belief that
one's work is terribly important." - Bertrand Russell
Anonymous
June 24, 2004 8:18:03 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

David S wrote:
> [posted to group and emailed]

BTW that is not nice. I read the group and don't need to see things
twice.

> Is a Thera worth buying for $75?

Only if you will find it useful as is. You cannot put any PocketPC
phone edition programs on it, and you cannot write code to interface
with the builtin cellular modem.

It does do voice IIRC (via a headset) so you can use it as a phone.

The OS is also dated and non-upgradeable.

Quite simply there is a reason why they are $75. Verizon are getting
antsy about requiring you have a data plan if you have a PDA style
device (and they can tell from the ESN what you have).

So it will be only be useful to you if you don't intend to run
3rd party phone edition programs, and are prepared to lose the
phone functionality in a few months time if Verizon insists
you have a data plan.

Oh, and they also crash and hang a lot. A lot more than the
other PocketPC devices I have used (all PPC devices are somewhat
flaky - the Thera was definitely the worst).

Roger
Anonymous
June 24, 2004 6:24:38 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

On Wed, 23 Jun 2004 23:27:23 -0700, "Roger Binns" <rogerb@rogerbinns.com>
chose to add this to the great equation of life, the universe, and
everything:

>David S wrote:
>> [posted to group and emailed]
>
>BTW that is not nice. I read the group and don't need to see things
>twice.

If you're like me, you read your email more often than you read the group,
and I wanted to get a quick response. I rarely do this, and when I do, I
make it a point to say so (as I did above).

>> Is a Thera worth buying for $75?
>
>Only if you will find it useful as is. You cannot put any PocketPC
>phone edition programs on it, and you cannot write code to interface
>with the builtin cellular modem.
>
>It does do voice IIRC (via a headset) so you can use it as a phone.
>
>The OS is also dated and non-upgradeable.
>
>Quite simply there is a reason why they are $75. Verizon are getting
>antsy about requiring you have a data plan if you have a PDA style
>device (and they can tell from the ESN what you have).
>
>So it will be only be useful to you if you don't intend to run
>3rd party phone edition programs, and are prepared to lose the
>phone functionality in a few months time if Verizon insists
>you have a data plan.
>
>Oh, and they also crash and hang a lot. A lot more than the
>other PocketPC devices I have used (all PPC devices are somewhat
>flaky - the Thera was definitely the worst).

Thanks for the advice. I think what it is going to come down to is whether
the digital voice recorder currently on sale at Radio Shack connects to a
computer. If it doesn't, I can make pretty good use of the Thera as it is
(I believe it said on the box that it has a voice recorder function).

--
David Streeter, "an internet god" -- Dave Barry
http://home.att.net/~dwstreeter
Remove the naughty bit from my address to reply
Expect a train on ANY track at ANY time.
"If Martha Stewart comes anywhere near my picnic, she's risking a barbecue
fork to the eyeball." - 4th of July picnic motto suggested by Dave Barry
Anonymous
June 24, 2004 10:37:05 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

David S wrote:
> If you're like me, you read your email more often than you read the group,
> and I wanted to get a quick response.

There is an old saying about what is a priority for you is not a priority
for me :-)

> I make it a point to say so (as I did above).

That was appreciated and is best practise.

> Thanks for the advice. I think what it is going to come down to is whether
> the digital voice recorder currently on sale at Radio Shack connects to a
> computer. If it doesn't, I can make pretty good use of the Thera as it is
> (I believe it said on the box that it has a voice recorder function).

All the PocketPC based devices have a voice recorder and if you find
a better voice recorder app that works on PocketPC 2002 then you
will also be able to install and use that.

Roger
!