Disk Partitioning

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

My computer has the disk divided into 2 partitions from when I bought it.
This was done by the manufacturer Sony. So I have a 60GB disk partitioned into
14 GB for the C drive and the rest for the D drive
My son had just bought a computer but he has no partition on the disk.
He has a 40 GB disk.
We both use NTFS not FAT. on XP home
My question: Should my son partition his disk, especially as he has
installed a lot of games, or is it not really necessary?
If it is a good thing to do, what is the best tools to do this with without
having to format the disk again. I have googled about this but I get
conflicting information.
Thanks for the advice in advance
7 answers Last reply
More about disk partitioning
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    Hi,

    Multiple partitions are a matter of personal choice. There is no particular
    reason why one would have to do that. I usually set up systems with two
    partitions, one for the operating system and programs, the other for data
    storage. The reason for this is so that the system partition can easily be
    formatted and reinstalled without losing the stored data, or necessitating
    copying everything to CD first (you may not get that chance in some
    situations). I know just as many people that are happy with one big
    partition for everything, and there's nothing wrong with that.

    If you want to repartition without damaging the existing system, you will
    need to use a third-party program, here are several of them:

    BootIT NG www.terabyteunlimited.com
    Partition Magic www.powerquest.com/partitionmagic
    Partition Commander http://www.v-com.com/product/pc_ind.html
    Ranish Partition Manager http://www.ranish.com/part/

    All are capable of doing what you ask. While these are all fairly safe to
    use, partitioning work carries with it an element of danger, so backup
    critical data before you begin just in case.

    --
    Best of Luck,

    Rick Rogers, aka "Nutcase" - Microsoft MVP
    http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/
    Associate Expert - WindowsXP Expert Zone
    www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone
    Windows help - www.rickrogers.org

    "TheBFG" <TheBFG@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:2D2F89F4-BCD8-420D-A309-69974E269426@microsoft.com...
    > My computer has the disk divided into 2 partitions from when I bought it.
    > This was done by the manufacturer Sony. So I have a 60GB disk partitioned
    > into
    > 14 GB for the C drive and the rest for the D drive
    > My son had just bought a computer but he has no partition on the disk.
    > He has a 40 GB disk.
    > We both use NTFS not FAT. on XP home
    > My question: Should my son partition his disk, especially as he has
    > installed a lot of games, or is it not really necessary?
    > If it is a good thing to do, what is the best tools to do this with
    > without
    > having to format the disk again. I have googled about this but I get
    > conflicting information.
    > Thanks for the advice in advance
    >
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    "TheBFG" <TheBFG@discussions.microsoft.com>
    wrote in news:2D2F89F4-BCD8-420D-A309-69974E269426@microsoft.com:
    > My computer has the disk divided into 2 partitions from when I bought
    > it. This was done by the manufacturer Sony. So I have a 60GB disk
    > partitioned into 14 GB for the C drive and the rest for the D drive
    > My son had just bought a computer but he has no partition on the disk.
    > He has a 40 GB disk.
    > We both use NTFS not FAT. on XP home
    > My question: Should my son partition his disk, especially as he has
    > installed a lot of games, or is it not really necessary?
    > If it is a good thing to do, what is the best tools to do this with
    > without having to format the disk again. I have googled about this
    > but I get conflicting information.
    > Thanks for the advice in advance

    The reasons for partitioning have waned due to the operating systems
    evolving to catch up with the ever increasing disk sizes. At one time,
    you were forced to partition because the OS wouldn't handle really big
    partitions. Today you don't need to partition but you might want to
    anyway. Partitioning lets you separate the type of files you will put
    into each. You could have one partition for the operating system and
    programs, another for games, another for your data, and a separate
    instance of other operating systems in other partitions (so you can
    multiboot and pick which operating system you want to use at that time).

    Personally, and because I am using only one operating system on my
    current home computer, I like to have 2 partitions: one for the
    operating system and applications, and another for my data. This way
    when I have to eventually do repairs or even do a [fresh] install of the
    operating system (and it WILL occur), I can do the OS repair or
    reinstall and/or reinstall the applications without worrying about my
    data. However, that does mean you need to move all your data over to
    the other partition. You can move your My Documents folder easily
    enough, but moving over your profile paths (for your account, the All
    Users and Default accounts, and all other accounts), and changing
    programs to store on the other partition, like for Outlook [Express],
    will take time and some digging into. When you reinstall the operating
    system or applications, you would then have to reconfigure them again to
    point at your data over on the other partition.

    Having separate partitions also lets you manage your backups. I save a
    drive image of my OS & app partition and only occasionally do logical
    backups of it. That's because it doesn't change much and many of the
    updates are automatic so a reinstall would be quick from an old drive
    image followed up automatic updates. I can then more often perform
    backups on my data partition to ensure my backups are up to date but
    without all the extraneous files intermixed with it from the OS & app
    partition. However, you can also usually configure your backups to list
    specific directories or files to include in a data-only backup but I
    really don't want to bother traversing all my paths to separate out my
    data from the OS and applications.

    So it is really a personal choice how you want to slice up your OS,
    applications, and data across multiple partitions or pile them
    altogether within one partition. This only discusses the use of basic
    drives in Windows. You can use dynamic drives to make one spanned
    volume that spans across multiple drives, much like RAID span array,
    where you can add more drives but they all become part of a single
    spanned volume. That way you can add more drives and to increase the
    storage capacity of a single drive letter but, as with software RAID, I
    suspect you cannot include the OS partition, and reliability of the
    spanned volume diminishes with each added drive in the same way it
    diminishes with striping in RAID 0 (if one drive dies then the whole
    stripe set or spanned volume dies, and the more drives you add the more
    likely one will die). There is no fault tolerance in spanned volumes or
    striped RAID 0 sets.


    --
    _________________________________________________________________
    ******** Post replies to newsgroup - Share with others ********
    Email: lh_811newsATyahooDOTcom and append "=NEWS=" to Subject.
    _________________________________________________________________
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    Thanx for the quick answers.
    Very helpful.


    "Vanguardx" wrote:

    > "TheBFG" <TheBFG@discussions.microsoft.com>
    > wrote in news:2D2F89F4-BCD8-420D-A309-69974E269426@microsoft.com:
    > > My computer has the disk divided into 2 partitions from when I bought
    > > it. This was done by the manufacturer Sony. So I have a 60GB disk
    > > partitioned into 14 GB for the C drive and the rest for the D drive
    > > My son had just bought a computer but he has no partition on the disk.
    > > He has a 40 GB disk.
    > > We both use NTFS not FAT. on XP home
    > > My question: Should my son partition his disk, especially as he has
    > > installed a lot of games, or is it not really necessary?
    > > If it is a good thing to do, what is the best tools to do this with
    > > without having to format the disk again. I have googled about this
    > > but I get conflicting information.
    > > Thanks for the advice in advance
    >
    > The reasons for partitioning have waned due to the operating systems
    > evolving to catch up with the ever increasing disk sizes. At one time,
    > you were forced to partition because the OS wouldn't handle really big
    > partitions. Today you don't need to partition but you might want to
    > anyway. Partitioning lets you separate the type of files you will put
    > into each. You could have one partition for the operating system and
    > programs, another for games, another for your data, and a separate
    > instance of other operating systems in other partitions (so you can
    > multiboot and pick which operating system you want to use at that time).
    >
    > Personally, and because I am using only one operating system on my
    > current home computer, I like to have 2 partitions: one for the
    > operating system and applications, and another for my data. This way
    > when I have to eventually do repairs or even do a [fresh] install of the
    > operating system (and it WILL occur), I can do the OS repair or
    > reinstall and/or reinstall the applications without worrying about my
    > data. However, that does mean you need to move all your data over to
    > the other partition. You can move your My Documents folder easily
    > enough, but moving over your profile paths (for your account, the All
    > Users and Default accounts, and all other accounts), and changing
    > programs to store on the other partition, like for Outlook [Express],
    > will take time and some digging into. When you reinstall the operating
    > system or applications, you would then have to reconfigure them again to
    > point at your data over on the other partition.
    >
    > Having separate partitions also lets you manage your backups. I save a
    > drive image of my OS & app partition and only occasionally do logical
    > backups of it. That's because it doesn't change much and many of the
    > updates are automatic so a reinstall would be quick from an old drive
    > image followed up automatic updates. I can then more often perform
    > backups on my data partition to ensure my backups are up to date but
    > without all the extraneous files intermixed with it from the OS & app
    > partition. However, you can also usually configure your backups to list
    > specific directories or files to include in a data-only backup but I
    > really don't want to bother traversing all my paths to separate out my
    > data from the OS and applications.
    >
    > So it is really a personal choice how you want to slice up your OS,
    > applications, and data across multiple partitions or pile them
    > altogether within one partition. This only discusses the use of basic
    > drives in Windows. You can use dynamic drives to make one spanned
    > volume that spans across multiple drives, much like RAID span array,
    > where you can add more drives but they all become part of a single
    > spanned volume. That way you can add more drives and to increase the
    > storage capacity of a single drive letter but, as with software RAID, I
    > suspect you cannot include the OS partition, and reliability of the
    > spanned volume diminishes with each added drive in the same way it
    > diminishes with striping in RAID 0 (if one drive dies then the whole
    > stripe set or spanned volume dies, and the more drives you add the more
    > likely one will die). There is no fault tolerance in spanned volumes or
    > striped RAID 0 sets.
    >
    >
    > --
    > _________________________________________________________________
    > ******** Post replies to newsgroup - Share with others ********
    > Email: lh_811newsATyahooDOTcom and append "=NEWS=" to Subject.
    > _________________________________________________________________
    >
    >
    >
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    I have a slightly different problem. My system came with the disk
    partitioned into 2 - one for programs (labeled C) and the other data storage
    (labeled D). I have added programs to C and the volume has decreased to under
    1GB. I have shifted as many unnecessary things as possible to D. I want to
    know if it is possible to increase the volume of C by essentially shifting
    some of the extra volume from D to C using DISKPART/extend? What would be the
    dangers/problems associated with this procedure or can it be done that way?
    Thanks
    Alleng

    "Rick "Nutcase" Rogers" wrote:

    > Hi,
    >
    > Multiple partitions are a matter of personal choice. There is no particular
    > reason why one would have to do that. I usually set up systems with two
    > partitions, one for the operating system and programs, the other for data
    > storage. The reason for this is so that the system partition can easily be
    > formatted and reinstalled without losing the stored data, or necessitating
    > copying everything to CD first (you may not get that chance in some
    > situations). I know just as many people that are happy with one big
    > partition for everything, and there's nothing wrong with that.
    >
    > If you want to repartition without damaging the existing system, you will
    > need to use a third-party program, here are several of them:
    >
    > BootIT NG www.terabyteunlimited.com
    > Partition Magic www.powerquest.com/partitionmagic
    > Partition Commander http://www.v-com.com/product/pc_ind.html
    > Ranish Partition Manager http://www.ranish.com/part/
    >
    > All are capable of doing what you ask. While these are all fairly safe to
    > use, partitioning work carries with it an element of danger, so backup
    > critical data before you begin just in case.
    >
    > --
    > Best of Luck,
    >
    > Rick Rogers, aka "Nutcase" - Microsoft MVP
    > http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/
    > Associate Expert - WindowsXP Expert Zone
    > www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone
    > Windows help - www.rickrogers.org
    >
    > "TheBFG" <TheBFG@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > news:2D2F89F4-BCD8-420D-A309-69974E269426@microsoft.com...
    > > My computer has the disk divided into 2 partitions from when I bought it.
    > > This was done by the manufacturer Sony. So I have a 60GB disk partitioned
    > > into
    > > 14 GB for the C drive and the rest for the D drive
    > > My son had just bought a computer but he has no partition on the disk.
    > > He has a 40 GB disk.
    > > We both use NTFS not FAT. on XP home
    > > My question: Should my son partition his disk, especially as he has
    > > installed a lot of games, or is it not really necessary?
    > > If it is a good thing to do, what is the best tools to do this with
    > > without
    > > having to format the disk again. I have googled about this but I get
    > > conflicting information.
    > > Thanks for the advice in advance
    > >
    >
    >
    >
  5. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    Hi Alleng,

    You can only use the DISKPART/extend to increase the size of a particular
    volume if there is unallocated (unpartitioned) space that is contiguous to
    the volume that you want to resize. In addition, you cannot use that utility
    to "resize" the boot or system partition, and I'm assuming that your C drive
    (volume) is a system partition.


    Regards,

    --
    Patti MacLeod
    Microsoft MVP - Windows Shell/User

    "Alleng" <Alleng@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:6848990D-9741-4375-AB2F-890D757F5F5C@microsoft.com...
    >
    > I have a slightly different problem. My system came with the disk
    > partitioned into 2 - one for programs (labeled C) and the other data
    storage
    > (labeled D). I have added programs to C and the volume has decreased to
    under
    > 1GB. I have shifted as many unnecessary things as possible to D. I want to
    > know if it is possible to increase the volume of C by essentially shifting
    > some of the extra volume from D to C using DISKPART/extend? What would be
    the
    > dangers/problems associated with this procedure or can it be done that
    way?
    > Thanks
    > Alleng
    >
    > "Rick "Nutcase" Rogers" wrote:
    >
    > > Hi,
    > >
    > > Multiple partitions are a matter of personal choice. There is no
    particular
    > > reason why one would have to do that. I usually set up systems with two
    > > partitions, one for the operating system and programs, the other for
    data
    > > storage. The reason for this is so that the system partition can easily
    be
    > > formatted and reinstalled without losing the stored data, or
    necessitating
    > > copying everything to CD first (you may not get that chance in some
    > > situations). I know just as many people that are happy with one big
    > > partition for everything, and there's nothing wrong with that.
    > >
    > > If you want to repartition without damaging the existing system, you
    will
    > > need to use a third-party program, here are several of them:
    > >
    > > BootIT NG www.terabyteunlimited.com
    > > Partition Magic www.powerquest.com/partitionmagic
    > > Partition Commander http://www.v-com.com/product/pc_ind.html
    > > Ranish Partition Manager http://www.ranish.com/part/
    > >
    > > All are capable of doing what you ask. While these are all fairly safe
    to
    > > use, partitioning work carries with it an element of danger, so backup
    > > critical data before you begin just in case.
    > >
    > > --
    > > Best of Luck,
    > >
    > > Rick Rogers, aka "Nutcase" - Microsoft MVP
    > > http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/
    > > Associate Expert - WindowsXP Expert Zone
    > > www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone
    > > Windows help - www.rickrogers.org
    > >
    > > "TheBFG" <TheBFG@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > > news:2D2F89F4-BCD8-420D-A309-69974E269426@microsoft.com...
    > > > My computer has the disk divided into 2 partitions from when I bought
    it.
    > > > This was done by the manufacturer Sony. So I have a 60GB disk
    partitioned
    > > > into
    > > > 14 GB for the C drive and the rest for the D drive
    > > > My son had just bought a computer but he has no partition on the disk.
    > > > He has a 40 GB disk.
    > > > We both use NTFS not FAT. on XP home
    > > > My question: Should my son partition his disk, especially as he has
    > > > installed a lot of games, or is it not really necessary?
    > > > If it is a good thing to do, what is the best tools to do this with
    > > > without
    > > > having to format the disk again. I have googled about this but I get
    > > > conflicting information.
    > > > Thanks for the advice in advance
    > > >
    > >
    > >
    > >
  6. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    Thanks Patti.
    Greatly appreciate it.

    "Patti MacLeod" wrote:

    > Hi Alleng,
    >
    > You can only use the DISKPART/extend to increase the size of a particular
    > volume if there is unallocated (unpartitioned) space that is contiguous to
    > the volume that you want to resize. In addition, you cannot use that utility
    > to "resize" the boot or system partition, and I'm assuming that your C drive
    > (volume) is a system partition.
    >
    >
    >
    > Regards,
    >
    > --
    > Patti MacLeod
    > Microsoft MVP - Windows Shell/User
    >
    > "Alleng" <Alleng@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > news:6848990D-9741-4375-AB2F-890D757F5F5C@microsoft.com...
    > >
    > > I have a slightly different problem. My system came with the disk
    > > partitioned into 2 - one for programs (labeled C) and the other data
    > storage
    > > (labeled D). I have added programs to C and the volume has decreased to
    > under
    > > 1GB. I have shifted as many unnecessary things as possible to D. I want to
    > > know if it is possible to increase the volume of C by essentially shifting
    > > some of the extra volume from D to C using DISKPART/extend? What would be
    > the
    > > dangers/problems associated with this procedure or can it be done that
    > way?
    > > Thanks
    > > Alleng
    > >
    > > "Rick "Nutcase" Rogers" wrote:
    > >
    > > > Hi,
    > > >
    > > > Multiple partitions are a matter of personal choice. There is no
    > particular
    > > > reason why one would have to do that. I usually set up systems with two
    > > > partitions, one for the operating system and programs, the other for
    > data
    > > > storage. The reason for this is so that the system partition can easily
    > be
    > > > formatted and reinstalled without losing the stored data, or
    > necessitating
    > > > copying everything to CD first (you may not get that chance in some
    > > > situations). I know just as many people that are happy with one big
    > > > partition for everything, and there's nothing wrong with that.
    > > >
    > > > If you want to repartition without damaging the existing system, you
    > will
    > > > need to use a third-party program, here are several of them:
    > > >
    > > > BootIT NG www.terabyteunlimited.com
    > > > Partition Magic www.powerquest.com/partitionmagic
    > > > Partition Commander http://www.v-com.com/product/pc_ind.html
    > > > Ranish Partition Manager http://www.ranish.com/part/
    > > >
    > > > All are capable of doing what you ask. While these are all fairly safe
    > to
    > > > use, partitioning work carries with it an element of danger, so backup
    > > > critical data before you begin just in case.
    > > >
    > > > --
    > > > Best of Luck,
    > > >
    > > > Rick Rogers, aka "Nutcase" - Microsoft MVP
    > > > http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/
    > > > Associate Expert - WindowsXP Expert Zone
    > > > www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone
    > > > Windows help - www.rickrogers.org
    > > >
    > > > "TheBFG" <TheBFG@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > > > news:2D2F89F4-BCD8-420D-A309-69974E269426@microsoft.com...
    > > > > My computer has the disk divided into 2 partitions from when I bought
    > it.
    > > > > This was done by the manufacturer Sony. So I have a 60GB disk
    > partitioned
    > > > > into
    > > > > 14 GB for the C drive and the rest for the D drive
    > > > > My son had just bought a computer but he has no partition on the disk.
    > > > > He has a 40 GB disk.
    > > > > We both use NTFS not FAT. on XP home
    > > > > My question: Should my son partition his disk, especially as he has
    > > > > installed a lot of games, or is it not really necessary?
    > > > > If it is a good thing to do, what is the best tools to do this with
    > > > > without
    > > > > having to format the disk again. I have googled about this but I get
    > > > > conflicting information.
    > > > > Thanks for the advice in advance
    > > > >
    > > >
    > > >
    > > >
    >
    >
    >
  7. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    You're very welcome :-)


    Regards,

    --
    Patti MacLeod
    Microsoft MVP - Windows Shell/User

    "Alleng" <Alleng@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:912F85FE-B9B3-4328-8163-47B6B617826B@microsoft.com...
    > Thanks Patti.
    > Greatly appreciate it.
    >
    > "Patti MacLeod" wrote:
    >
    > > Hi Alleng,
    > >
    > > You can only use the DISKPART/extend to increase the size of a
    particular
    > > volume if there is unallocated (unpartitioned) space that is contiguous
    to
    > > the volume that you want to resize. In addition, you cannot use that
    utility
    > > to "resize" the boot or system partition, and I'm assuming that your C
    drive
    > > (volume) is a system partition.
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > Regards,
    > >
    > > --
    > > Patti MacLeod
    > > Microsoft MVP - Windows Shell/User
    > >
    > > "Alleng" <Alleng@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > > news:6848990D-9741-4375-AB2F-890D757F5F5C@microsoft.com...
    > > >
    > > > I have a slightly different problem. My system came with the disk
    > > > partitioned into 2 - one for programs (labeled C) and the other data
    > > storage
    > > > (labeled D). I have added programs to C and the volume has decreased
    to
    > > under
    > > > 1GB. I have shifted as many unnecessary things as possible to D. I
    want to
    > > > know if it is possible to increase the volume of C by essentially
    shifting
    > > > some of the extra volume from D to C using DISKPART/extend? What would
    be
    > > the
    > > > dangers/problems associated with this procedure or can it be done that
    > > way?
    > > > Thanks
    > > > Alleng
    > > >
    > > > "Rick "Nutcase" Rogers" wrote:
    > > >
    > > > > Hi,
    > > > >
    > > > > Multiple partitions are a matter of personal choice. There is no
    > > particular
    > > > > reason why one would have to do that. I usually set up systems with
    two
    > > > > partitions, one for the operating system and programs, the other for
    > > data
    > > > > storage. The reason for this is so that the system partition can
    easily
    > > be
    > > > > formatted and reinstalled without losing the stored data, or
    > > necessitating
    > > > > copying everything to CD first (you may not get that chance in some
    > > > > situations). I know just as many people that are happy with one big
    > > > > partition for everything, and there's nothing wrong with that.
    > > > >
    > > > > If you want to repartition without damaging the existing system, you
    > > will
    > > > > need to use a third-party program, here are several of them:
    > > > >
    > > > > BootIT NG www.terabyteunlimited.com
    > > > > Partition Magic www.powerquest.com/partitionmagic
    > > > > Partition Commander http://www.v-com.com/product/pc_ind.html
    > > > > Ranish Partition Manager http://www.ranish.com/part/
    > > > >
    > > > > All are capable of doing what you ask. While these are all fairly
    safe
    > > to
    > > > > use, partitioning work carries with it an element of danger, so
    backup
    > > > > critical data before you begin just in case.
    > > > >
    > > > > --
    > > > > Best of Luck,
    > > > >
    > > > > Rick Rogers, aka "Nutcase" - Microsoft MVP
    > > > > http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/
    > > > > Associate Expert - WindowsXP Expert Zone
    > > > > www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone
    > > > > Windows help - www.rickrogers.org
    > > > >
    > > > > "TheBFG" <TheBFG@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > > > > news:2D2F89F4-BCD8-420D-A309-69974E269426@microsoft.com...
    > > > > > My computer has the disk divided into 2 partitions from when I
    bought
    > > it.
    > > > > > This was done by the manufacturer Sony. So I have a 60GB disk
    > > partitioned
    > > > > > into
    > > > > > 14 GB for the C drive and the rest for the D drive
    > > > > > My son had just bought a computer but he has no partition on the
    disk.
    > > > > > He has a 40 GB disk.
    > > > > > We both use NTFS not FAT. on XP home
    > > > > > My question: Should my son partition his disk, especially as he
    has
    > > > > > installed a lot of games, or is it not really necessary?
    > > > > > If it is a good thing to do, what is the best tools to do this
    with
    > > > > > without
    > > > > > having to format the disk again. I have googled about this but I
    get
    > > > > > conflicting information.
    > > > > > Thanks for the advice in advance
    > > > > >
    > > > >
    > > > >
    > > > >
    > >
    > >
    > >
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