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BioShock Soaked in DRM Fiasco

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August 27, 2007 11:51:00 PM

It’s been almost a week since BioShock’s launch, and the DRM fiasco involving SecuROM’s copy protection software is still raging. Here’s a look at the BioShock copy protection controversy.

http://www.twitchguru.com/2007/08/27/bioshock_drm/
August 27, 2007 11:59:14 PM

It's such a shame (or maybe not) that they're going to lose a ton of sales because of this. I played the demo, really liked it, but am extremely irritated that it left crapware on my PC that shouldn't be there.

No way in HELL am I going to spend money on that game or any other game released by anyone involved in this mess.

Not for a long while.

I thought I was done with this after starforce was shunned. Are they TRYING to push PC gamers towards consoles?

I do feel bad for all of the programmers who worked so hard to make a great game.
August 28, 2007 12:33:44 AM

the demo leaves crapware?
Related resources
August 28, 2007 12:43:49 AM

I call it crapware, probably should just call it malware. Check the thread down just a bit.
August 28, 2007 1:03:35 AM

No, you called it right the first time.
August 28, 2007 3:03:37 AM

What I'm really curious about (And haven't heard anything on yet) is if the online delivered version (Through Steam) is affected by the same problems. Has anyone heard? I got the online version as I had an Amex gift card I couldn't use anywhere up in Canada, but I'm not brave enough to try uninstalling and re-installing it just to see if it will crap out on me.

Anyone know? RobWright? ^^
August 28, 2007 3:53:32 AM

To paraphrase "If you build crap, they will come, with a vengeance".
August 28, 2007 4:02:02 AM

I'll eventually get the game, but I will not pay full price. I got the Prey special edition brand new from gamestop a few weeks ago for $10. When Bioshoc reaches that price.. I may consider it.
August 28, 2007 6:46:26 AM

TSIMonster said:
I'll eventually get the game, but I will not pay full price. I got the Prey special edition brand new from gamestop a few weeks ago for $10. When Bioshoc reaches that price.. I may consider it.


I pretty much do the same. It is about the same time that the games start to work under Wine in Linux. Only paid $9.99 ea. for COD2 and HL2: Episode 1.

Tried to run the Bioshock demo, but the SecuROM would not run under Wine. No SecuROM, no demo, and no money from me.
August 28, 2007 6:52:15 AM

What something like this boils down to in my book, I wouldn't touch this software with a bargepole.

Fact: I have one analysis software installed (which cost several hundred bucks) with a wicked protection scheme. I'm dead scared the activation server some day will just disappear but it has been up for more than three years now. But my PC is soon to be upgraded so... :) 
August 28, 2007 9:13:47 AM

I wont buy another Take Two product - until they issue a statement to show that they wont use this kind of DRM in the future - I would encourage all developers considering using this publisher to think twice and insist on no malware with their work.
This kind of copy protection means that in 5 to 10 years time no-one will be able to play Bioshock -as all original owners will have reached the limit - it just shows the publishers are in this for short term gains - and screw the end user community. The best response is don't buy it - ever!
August 28, 2007 9:19:16 AM

Appologies - replace take two with 2K in above post.
August 28, 2007 9:24:55 AM

It's sad that they didn't make an exclusive deal with Steam. Steam works, it protects against piracy, which is really important b/c PC gaming is collapsing due to piracy.

I think it's important to aknowledge their need to protect their software. However, I hate having to plug in my CD into drive. HATE IT.

The new 5 installs with the possibility of uninstalls is REALLY lax, I don't know who could have a problem with the new rules. Still though, going exclusive with Steam would have made for a smoother release. I don't know what was up with Circuit City selling this game for $40.00 on release date though... so I jumped on it. WIsh I had Steam though. The hard release should have gone through Steam, and playing the game should require an internet connection... I don't like piracy and this method is ticking people off which is exactly what gets a PC game cracked to begin with.

I give it a few months before Bioshock is cracked... cracked so that you don't need a stupid disk, and cracked so you can actually play the thing. Way to go.

And by the way, the game is SERIOUSLY overrated.
August 28, 2007 9:26:51 AM

When will the producers learn that DRM will ALWAYS hurt their customers and promote piracy. For one hand, the hackers will always be one step forward. They will always be able to crack any kind of protection. So, using this ridiculous DRM tecnics will only make genuine customers to search for EXE or NOCD crack for the games they've bought. Eventually, they will stop to buy games, and just download them from internet. Why to pay for the game, if you have to crack it? Doesn't make any sense...
:pfff: 
August 28, 2007 9:29:30 AM

People remember this:
Every company that exists, exists solely to make a profit, nothing else.

If they can try prevent you copying the game "illegally", and/or make you buy it more than once they are more than happy to do that. Customer service/satisfaction is just a side benefit that is not really intended it is just a consequence of "industry standards." Long term customers are not their focus, by then newer games will make them far more money.
August 28, 2007 9:59:34 AM

I remember the low grumble that occured (all those years ago) when Alpha Centauri didn't require the CD to be present in the drive but the expansion did and reverse engineered Alpha Centauri to require it as well.

But it died down. I think we all realized that it was a necessary and fair step to ensure the game's profitablilty as far as the general piublic goes. We gamers can be reasonable.

I think they're pushing a bit too far here. IMO this is (among other things) a blatant attempt to block a certain segment of gamers from beating the game and reselling it, sharing it with friends (LEGALLY), or just giving it away. Maybe even an attempt to explore the possibilty of drying up used PC game sales all together.

And what do they have to lose? If every gamer is a console gamer in 10-20 years they'll still make the money on sales and they won't have to worry about piracy.

PC Gamers are just a necessary evil to them. Why make the experience pleasant? My wish is for one of those $%^* to travel to my house on their own time and clean my PC of the crap their demo left on it.

I'm assuming that won't happen.
August 28, 2007 10:02:10 AM

randomizer said:
People remember this:
Customer service/satisfaction is just a side benefit that is not really intended it is just a consequence of "industry standards." Long term customers are not their focus, by then newer games will make them far more money.


True, but we that buy games instead of downloading piracy do it for 3 reasons:
1st: Support develop of more games (maybe not everyone does this...)
2nd: Because of the beautifull box and all manuals that comes with it (ehehehe)
3rd: People are just too lazy to download it from the internet

Concerning the 3rd reason, imagine this: you can have 2 options- a) buy the game and go trough a living hell on the install / error / failure of your OS because of all the crappware that is installed along with the game (Starforce or other DRM crap) or b) download a "safer..." pirate copy from the internet, apply the crack and forget about it, and still save some bucks... Ok, i've bought this game... ok, the company made proffit with it... ok, i WILL NOT buy any more games from this or any other company that uses DRM schemes.
Bottom line is: Instead of collect the eggs, 2K killed the chicken to have them all at once. Now, there is no chicken and no more eggs.
August 28, 2007 10:04:29 AM

zincas said:
True, but we that buy games instead of downloading piracy do it for 3 reasons:
1st: Support develop of more games (maybe not everyone does this...)
2nd: Because of the beautifull box and all manuals that comes with it (ehehehe)
3rd: People are just too lazy to download it from the internet

Concerning the 3rd reason, imagine this: you can have 2 options- a) buy the game and go trough a living hell on the install / error / failure of your OS because of all the crappware that is installed along with the game (Starforce or other DRM crap) or b) download a "safer..." pirate copy from the internet, apply the crack and forget about it, and still save some bucks... Ok, i've bought this game... ok, the company made proffit with it... ok, i WILL NOT buy any more games from this or any other company that uses DRM schemes.
Bottom line is: Instead of collect the eggs, 2K killed the chicken to have them all at once. Now, there is no chicken and no more eggs.

4th reason: You can't be fined/arrested for buying a game legally.
August 28, 2007 10:07:08 AM

EHEHEHEHHEHE!

Nice 4th reason....
August 28, 2007 11:49:09 AM

The Unreal (not counting u2) games have done well on PC (why else wouldn't it still be around), UT and UT2k4 (i'm assuming ut2k3 aswell) did not need cd/dvd in the drive, I hope UT3 does the same.

OMG NO MORE CHICKEN - I'M GOING TO STARVE WHEN I GO TO KFC!!
August 28, 2007 11:59:01 AM

This is a great post!

Quote:
Is man not entitled to the game he buys?

NO, says the man at Securom. It belongs to 2K.
NO, says the man at 2K. It belongs to us.
NO, says the man at Microsoft. It belongs to our license purchasers.

I rejected those answers.

Instead, I chose something different. I chose the impossible. I chose...piracy! Where the gamer would not be censored, where the PC owner would not be bound by petty encryption, where the buyer would not be constrained by corporate greed. And with the downloading of your torrents, piracy could become your salvation.


http://forums.2kgames.com/forums/showpost.php?p=149500&...
August 28, 2007 12:46:08 PM

I have some upgrades coming in for my gaming rig this week, faster CPU and a DX10 card. I was looking forward to going out and purchasing BioShock after I got everything changed out and Windows set back up. I guess that isn't going to happen now, at least not until they quit using the DRM crap. WGA is bad enough, I am not going to start dealing with that style of DRM/activation to run an app or game.
August 28, 2007 1:20:29 PM

What happens when they decide they dont want to support the game anymore and take down the Secure Servers that allow you to install? I guess you wont be able to install and have a nice coaster instead of a game. Nice...
August 28, 2007 1:41:25 PM

Bioshock will be cracked just like every other game. The crap they pull to try and prevent it only hurts the people who buy the game.
August 28, 2007 2:24:38 PM

copy protection is to make legit users go thru hell to play the game while non-legit users will just use crack.
August 28, 2007 2:44:06 PM

I think the idea of using the copy protection was to protect sales at launch... after all, if the game was cracked, pirated, and available online before the retail release, it would harm sales.

Where they screwed up, though, was not being honest about it.

They needed to be up front in saying "here's what our system does, here's what it doesn't do, here's what you can do about it, here's what our plans are going forward". They're still only being very reactionary to any of these issues, and it's stuff like this that makes game developers scared of releasing top-tier titles on the PC.

That aside, the enthusiast PC gamer is (typically) extraordinarily well-informed, and it means that, if a publisher wants the support of those customers, they need to do a better job in regards to customer service and informing the consumer about what is going on behind the scenes.

Asymmetric information only results in market failure, and we're seeing it quite vividly here.
August 28, 2007 3:06:09 PM

I don't understand why anyone should be required to even have an internet connection to play this game. I pay for the discs, and if these mofos want me to register it through the internet, they should pay a month's worth/or the minimum initial subscribtion of fees towards an internet connection. Does this game, as Half life 2 before them list it as a requirement? I didn't see it on the box!

I didn't buy half life 2, and I aint buying this piece of crap game.
August 28, 2007 3:28:06 PM

belal said:
What I'm really curious about (And haven't heard anything on yet) is if the online delivered version (Through Steam) is affected by the same problems. Has anyone heard? I got the online version as I had an Amex gift card I couldn't use anywhere up in Canada, but I'm not brave enough to try uninstalling and re-installing it just to see if it will crap out on me.

Anyone know? RobWright? ^^


Fudge, I forgot to include that little nugget. Yes, the rules apply to Steam and all other digital distribution networks. It doesn't matter that Steam has its own system in place, the SecuROM copy protection is still there for the Steam version.

Speaking of SecuROM, I'll throw this out: I wondered why 2K waited so long to release a BioShock demo for the PC and finally released it on the day the full game launched, which is extremely odd. Could it have had something to do with SecuROM? Did the company know that the DRM was going to cause an uproar and simply tried to delay the inevitable? I'd hate to think it's true, but...in light of recent events, it seems possible.
August 28, 2007 3:37:27 PM

In this day and age.. why would you not have an internet connection. How would you update your system? The game? Get drivers? That is the dumbest reason to forgo one of the best games on the market!
August 28, 2007 3:44:55 PM

This will definately put a hamper on people sharing games they have legally paid for with their friends and the ability to resell the game at a later time. Most EULA agreements state you are allowed to use the software "on one machine" at a time. There usually is no mention of being able to give it away or re-sell it after you have used it. Used software has been a commodity for a long time now as most other things normally purchased as used (such as a book or music CD). This seems to indicate that the industry is trying to take that right away from the end purchaser. Doesn't this violate all such "Fair Use" policies?

I have been sharing games with my friends for almost 10 years now. Whenever we buy a new game and beat them, we pass them down to someone else that wants to play them. This all started back in the early days of being a student with little money to spend. We would pool our money and buy a game and then each person would play it then pass it to the next. The person who put up the most for the pool was the "game holder" and would keep the game when everyone was finished playing it. When the multiplayer type games came out, that changed things a bit since each person would need to have their own copy in order to play it with someone else. Those types of games weren't passed down. BioShock is a single player game. While I understand the re-play value of games, some games aren't worth re-playing or if they are, after a while, they do get "old". For this reason, this game will NOT be in my "to buy" list. A pity too as I was looking forward to playing this game.
August 28, 2007 4:09:17 PM

stemnin said:
The Unreal (not counting u2) games have done well on PC (why else wouldn't it still be around), UT and UT2k4 (i'm assuming ut2k3 aswell) did not need cd/dvd in the drive, I hope UT3 does the same.


As one who bought all the unreal games the moment they were released and preordered many of those let me say this... when they were first released, UT2k3 and 2k4 both required the cd for the first month or so. It was ~ the third patch that removed the cd check on each of them. I do not remember on the first UT if that was the case. Unreal2 also required it at first but I do not remember when they removed it. Don't remember the first unreal on that aspect at all...

I say all that to point out that They have always locked down the checks for ~ the first month or so and then open it up. Helps keep the bulk of the sales up in their minds I think. ;)  Epic has always been quality in my mind... and even if they have a cd check at first that is their MO from the past. If they go the DRM route like this though that will remove one of the last vestiges of true PC gamer support.

@rob:
yikes, I hope that is not the reason for the delay... but methinks that if they are showing such chaos with "support" you may be on to something.
August 28, 2007 4:34:10 PM

From my point of view the issue is larger than usage rights. Even the demo leaves SecuRom null registry entries, hidden files and 'services' in the windows system32 directory. The idea of spending 30 minutes to remove all traces of software you spent a$50.00 is offensive.

It would be easy for Sony/SecuRom to include a full clean up upon uninstall but they do not. Exactly what their agenda is, is open to question. No one has the right to alter my machine without my consent. This Securom system is no different than any other malware, spy-ware or other outside attempt to invade our personal property (systems). They give no notice of what will happen when you consent to load their software. Clearly if they notified the customer that using the product will make almost permanent changes to the registry and other OS files and that these changes may cause conflicts, it would impact sales.

In short the marketing of this product is by a bunch of 'whores' who see nothing wrong with usurping individual rights in an attempt to protect their interests.

I will not buy this game.

Here is a link to directions to remove all traces of SecuRom: http://www.gamingbob.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=300
August 28, 2007 5:20:24 PM

Imagine coming back from the store after purchasing the latest blockbuster on HD DVD (or Blue Ray, don't start arguing =) ), to find technicians working for the movie studio installing video cameras in your house to make sure that you don't loan the movie to a friend or family member. This SecuRom crap is the same thing. No company has the right to monitor what I do with a product I have purchased, EVER, PERIOD. There isn't a chance in hell companies could get away with attempting to monitor what we do in our homes, they shouldn't be using software to monitor what we do on our computers.
August 28, 2007 5:40:14 PM

I wouldn't say that all software is crackable. There are cracks out there for things like Star Force, but they're so god damn involved that its not worth it. I tried to play a copied version of a space game that had Star Force for the protection method and to do so, you had to do things like unhook your optical drives, install some program, do this, that, blah blah. I said screw it. Wasn't worth it just to see what the game was like.

It does sadden me that the game had this happen. The demo on the 360 was great (I'm glad I used the 360 version instead of the PC since I don't want that SecureROM crap on my PC). Sorry to see such a good game get hampered with crap like this. I remember buying Star Wars: Empire at War, getting it home, finding the CD key misprinted off the edge of the manual, taking it back since I couldn't install it, getting it home again, installing it, and trying to run it only to have it tell me that I was trying to pirate the game. I had spend 2 hours to find out that I needed to go into my registry to modify a value that set me as having admin priviledges to my DVD drive (no clue why I didn't already). Was because of the copy protection scheme on the disc. I sent a nasty email to Lucas Arts for that one.
August 28, 2007 5:58:21 PM

I am dead set against this activation crap. It only hurts the end user (legal owner). The pirates will find ways to circumvent it anyway. I guess my first dose of this was with Microsoft's activation scheme in Windows XP. It seems that Microsoft set a trend that others decided to follow. It's all the same though, headache for the legit end user, victory for the pirates.. DAMN PIRATES!
August 28, 2007 6:28:44 PM

They are just pushing this **** too far.

almost every other game with a copy protection on it warns you clearly on the box....something like This game contains technology intended to prevent copying that may conflict with some disk and virtual disk drives(thats pretty standard for secuROM on disks)....

I did not see anything on that game about it....

My question is why not just leave it on the disk....if someone wants it bad enough they are just going to crack it anyway.

And yeah MS's activation has never bugged me....and it does not leave crap everywhere....
August 28, 2007 6:37:42 PM

timinator said:
I am dead set against this activation crap. It only hurts the end user (legal owner). The pirates will find ways to circumvent it anyway. I guess my first dose of this was with Microsoft's activation scheme in Windows XP. It seems that Microsoft set a trend that others decided to follow. It's all the same though, headache for the legit end user, victory for the pirates.. DAMN PIRATES!


I`m a Yankees fan myself ;) 
August 28, 2007 7:47:26 PM

No wonder Pirates of the Carribbean became a trilogical monster
August 28, 2007 8:06:19 PM

Kronos said:
I`m a Yankees fan myself ;) 


A wise man once wrote, rooting for the Yankees is like rooting for the house in Vegas ;) 

Kronos, here's my prediction for this week's series: Pettitte beats Dice-K tonight in a close game, Yanks win Game 1; Beckett destroys the Yanks and Clemens melts down (as usual), Sox win Game 2; Schilling and Wang both get beat up a little, but Sox bullpen outlast Yanks bullpen, Sox win Game 3.


Oh, and here's more BioShock/2K stuff. I can't believe this is true, but read the below post. Ken Levine reportedly posted this on the 2K site and then the 2K moderator took it down. Not exactly sure why, but read on and I'm sure you'll be as surprised as I was concerning his tech knowledge.

Quote:

Hey all-

I'm really trying to answer every PM I get, both here, on TTLG, on Live and a couple of other sites I post on. Since BioShock has made the splash it has, this takes up a bunch of my time. In the interest of saving everybody's time, here's a little FAQ about things I can and cannot answer for you.

Things I can answer:

-Story questions
-Voice acting questions (If you hate that damn circus of values clown, you got me to thank!)
-Interface question
-Gameplay questions
-Art direction questions
-Other aesthetic questions (you hate that Perry Como track, I'm your man!)
-Widescreen questions (i.e. WHY THE HELL DID YOU DO IT THAT WAY, DICKHEAD! etc.)

I take responsiblity for all decisions made by my team at IG/2K Boston/Australia. I won't be able to answer the more technical questions (I love it when people write to me as if I've even heard of shader 2.0! I'm a technological moron.), but I can try to point you in the right direction (which is generally the tech support forums). I do have a huge amount of say as to what goes into patches, given budgetary limitations coming from 2K, however, so feel free to make your voices heard.


Things I can't answer:

These are some of the aspects of the BioShock experience that aren't under my control:

-Customer Service Policies and procedures- I don't have any control over customer service budget or decision making. Like...Zero. You may think I'm some kind of important dude, but at the end of the day we make the games, 2K New York publishes them, does customer support, etc. I've been heavily involved all week trying to get things improved for people, but at the end of the day, I can't take credit or blame for any changes to customer service.

-Copy Protection. Copy protection calls are all made in New York by Technical Director Tim Perry. Our job is to implement what he decides. If he's not a member of these forums, I'll suggest to Elizabeth that he gets active in them. The only thing I know about Securom is I've got about 1000 games with some version of it on my shelf. The tech that I know is limited to my experience many years ago as Macintosh computer consultant- in the days before the tubes of the interweb. All that stuff is entirely out of my hands and frankly a bit beyond my understanding.


My understanding is 2k has hired or is about to hire 24 hour a day support for the forums, amongst other things. I think we were all surprised by what a hit BioShock has been. I expect things to keep getting better. I'll try to help where I can, but there's a large organization above me that I have only marginal input into.

Thanks for listening. If we can direct PM-informed traffic to the most appropriate people everybody can get better and more timely answers to their questions.
August 28, 2007 8:23:23 PM

zincas said:
When will the producers learn that DRM will ALWAYS hurt their customers and promote piracy. For one hand, the hackers will always be one step forward. They will always be able to crack any kind of protection. So, using this ridiculous DRM tecnics will only make genuine customers to search for EXE or NOCD crack for the games they've bought. Eventually, they will stop to buy games, and just download them from internet. Why to pay for the game, if you have to crack it? Doesn't make any sense...
:pfff: 


Just watch: As soon as a properly cracked version pops up, you'll start seeing Bioshock benchmarks in the hardware reviews of some sites. Many people who must own licenses because of legal scrutiny will sneak past registration issues by using cracks, in spite of license ownership.
August 28, 2007 9:19:02 PM

Kronos said:
I`m a Yankees fan myself ;) 


:D  :D  :D 
August 28, 2007 10:21:04 PM

As a legitimate game purchaser over many years, I've always hated CD copy protection - I don't WANT to copy the ******* disc :fou:  :fou:  :fou:  , but being forced to have the game CD in the drive just for the game to run... that's a real PITA when you have a dozen or more games taking up space on your hard drive and another 12 CD's lying around somewhere at arms length. Almost every game I have ever installed will ask if I want a "full install", takes up gigabytes of space on my hard drive, yet still needs the silly CD in the drive to run. :cry: 

I can honestly understand those gamers that look for no-CD cracks and virtual drive software to let them enjoy their store-bought games "off the box" and not need to play "disc roulette" every time they want to get down and frag.

And then there is the hard way, as I found out a while back, when your CD becomes unreadable/scratched/damaged/misplaced, your expensive $40-$60 game that you purchased and "fully installed", becomes unplayable and useless, all because the game won't start without the stupid CD in the drive.

Online activation and forced installation limits - now that's a nasty big zit right there. A few months back I bought BF2 deluxe and the two expansion packs. I installed the game, I entered the software keys, I registered online and created my account. Result? Game did not work!!! I checked FAQ, checked online support and verified my account. Nothing. Nada. Zilch. Zip.

After finally reaching EA support on the phone after 4 days, a rep told me that their server was "confused" and I needed to change my soldier name to my account name.

:heink:  :heink:  :heink: 

Well, it works now. I can enjoy my $60 purchase until EA decides to pull their account server down. I somehow don't think though that when that day comes they will be refunding me my $60, in light of the fact that my perfectly working purchase will at that point be forced worthless by them.

I agree that nobody has the right to modify my computer in any manner without my knowledge, that I may install and use software that I have purchased legally on a computer without somebody watching how many times I fart, and that software should return the system to the state that it was at if I ever decide to uninstall.

This whole DRM issue is becoming more than just an argument for supporting game developers. It is slowly coming to the point where legitimate buyers are being screwed out of their own money and enjoyment, their fair-use rights are being taken away and their privacy is being violated. WAKE UP SONY AND ALL YOU OTHER A-HOLES!!! IT AIN'T GONNA WORK. Pirates will always be one step ahead, you can never develop a foolproof system, DRM will only hurt honest consumers and turn otherwise magnificent software into a hated product.

If you want to eliminate piracy, you need to eliminate the source of all piracy:

STOP COPY PROTECTION AND END DRM
August 29, 2007 2:51:48 AM

I'm not into stealing software, all of my software is 100% legal. That said, I was going to download the demo until I found out about the Sony DRM. No demo and no game for me. I see by the above post the game has been supposedly cracked already. I hope they lose a mother load of sales and that the game is pirated to the maximum. I hope they learn their lesson for messing with fair usage and surreptitiously putting malware on PCs. Screw them for ever. [:zorg]
August 29, 2007 3:50:31 AM

Zorg said:
I hope they lose a mother load of sales and that the game is pirated to the maximum. I hope they learn their lesson for messing with fair usage and surreptitiously putting malware on PCs. Screw them for ever.


I can't say I hope the game gets pirated - all this talk of piracy will just goad them on and convince them they are on the moral high ground.

That said, I do hope this ends up hitting them in the pocket book. Hard. That's about the only thing that get the attention of a large corporation these days.

If that doesn't work, maybe the class action lawsuits that are almost certain to arise from this mess will adjust their thinking.

On a side note, this mess makes me shudder to think of what things may be like if Sony's Blu Ray wins the hi-def DVD battle.

August 29, 2007 4:09:13 AM

zincas said:
When will the producers learn that DRM will ALWAYS hurt their customers and promote piracy. For one hand, the hackers will always be one step forward. They will always be able to crack any kind of protection. So, using this ridiculous DRM tecnics will only make genuine customers to search for EXE or NOCD crack for the games they've bought. Eventually, they will stop to buy games, and just download them from internet. Why to pay for the game, if you have to crack it? Doesn't make any sense...
:pfff: 


heh, was just gonna say the same. Cracked versions seem to be 100 times better these days, as they bypass all DRM schemes. All I can say for the company is the chapter 11 forms are located here:
http://www.uscourts.gov/bkforms/

:lol: 

When your customers lose trust in you, your screwed. :pt1cable: 
August 29, 2007 4:18:31 AM

spongebob said:

On a side note, this mess makes me shudder to think of what things may be like if Sony's Blu Ray wins the hi-def DVD battle.


History has proven that this will NEVER happen, as all of Sony Baloney's formats have always sunk down the deepest drain. Why? Because they are too greedy, and everyone jumps on the other bandwagon because of wider support, cheaper media, and most importantly, competition without massive royalties. We will see this when hi def dvd recorders support both formats. The media wont be phased out because of the dual support, but it will collect dust at your local store if it cannot compete dollar wise in the blank media sector.
August 29, 2007 5:23:19 AM

spongebob said:
That said, I do hope this ends up hitting them in the pocket book. Hard. That's about the only thing that get the attention of a large corporation these days.


Well, they won't get a dime of my hard earned American dollar!
August 29, 2007 6:03:28 AM

Just say 'meh' and be done with it.
August 29, 2007 7:22:18 AM

Living in a mid-east country where cheap, hyperspeed 24/7 internet is still not common (and neither is the consumerism/materialism to leave your computer on like that, and copyright enforcement is relatively lax), I can tell you that people would rather buy a pirated copy of the game even if the original was being given away for free. The effort/pain is just too much and the fancy-graphic corporate-produced games aren't much better fun-wise/replay-value than before. I'm supposed to buy a game for entertainment, for relaxing after a hard day at work/school/whatever, and while we always had the trouble of needing proper hardware requirements, the software people have been adding complications that, compared to the gaming industry of previous years, is the computer equivelant of a 1984 novel. I wouldn't take an original copy of any Steam game as a gift. I'm not about to let them dictate when I can reformat my computer and I just don't have the time/money to waste getting it to update Gigabytes of God-knows-what data (there was a time when patches/updates were considered to be a company's bungle for releasing an incomplete product rather than 'free stuff'. I see people rushing to download newer versions of DirectX with the idea that it will improve the physical hardware in their boxes; as if they are cunningly getting something for nothing. I can see a lot of Steam fanboys on forums saying it's no hassle for them but I never ever see any info/change-list of what exatcly these long updates do, although I can bet that they will be doing a lot more 'uploading' than the company lets on. What do you get? A free mod that was never good enough to be released in the original game? Remember when StarWars was re-released with footage that they never saw fit to include in the original in the first place?). There's a fun game, Alpha Centauri, that doesn't even need CD checks, thus making it easy to install on multiple computers with friends. I bought my own original copy for that one. Go figure.

The only language these business-people understand is money. I'm living in an urbanized desert and don't have much in the way of recreation except passive indoor stuff like tv/video-games, but I suggest you lucky folks living in the rainy greenlands take a break from the video-games and spend more time outdoors to show these money grubbers what-for until they re-think their policies and profit-margins.
August 29, 2007 8:03:42 AM

As I said before:

People remember this:
Every company that exists, exists solely to make a profit, nothing else. said:
People remember this:
Every company that exists, exists solely to make a profit, nothing else.
!