IBM keyboard on HP Pavilion

Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

It's time to ask again.

My wonderful old IBM clickclack will not work on my HP 505n Pavilion.
I tried three keyboards, none worked. They were a blue-label by
Lexmark, the old IBM-M, and old Keytronics. All worked on
my friend's HP Pavilion 764n. None work on my 505n.

My motherboard failed recently (in warranty) and HP replaced it.
They took 8 weeks but the good keyboards still don't work.

I've tried "everything" including adding recommended two
pull-up resistors.

Anyone have any idea? My wrists can't stand modern keyboards.

Can I turn the IBM keyboard into a wireless USB connection?
Can I rewire it?
Is there a "modern" good keyboard?

Mason C
27 answers Last reply
More about keyboard pavilion
  1. Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    Mason,

    I'm with you on the clickety-click 101-key old IBM keyboard. Hardware
    designers seem to be messing with the chip that handles the keyboard, departing
    from the old standard IC.

    Two suggestions:

    Try a PS/2-to-USB adapter and plug in the IBM keyboard that way. Let me know if
    it works. The days of the PS/2 "legacy" keyboard connector are numbered.

    Try a newer IBM keyboard. Not nearly as sturdy, but not a bad touch. Dell
    keyboards are decent, too. Not sure about the schlock you find in the retail
    stores... Ben Myers

    On Sun, 23 May 2004 03:06:04 GMT, MasonC <masonc@ix.netcom.xyz.com> wrote:

    >It's time to ask again.
    >
    >My wonderful old IBM clickclack will not work on my HP 505n Pavilion.
    >I tried three keyboards, none worked. They were a blue-label by
    >Lexmark, the old IBM-M, and old Keytronics. All worked on
    >my friend's HP Pavilion 764n. None work on my 505n.
    >
    > My motherboard failed recently (in warranty) and HP replaced it.
    >They took 8 weeks but the good keyboards still don't work.
    >
    >I've tried "everything" including adding recommended two
    >pull-up resistors.
    >
    >Anyone have any idea? My wrists can't stand modern keyboards.
    >
    >Can I turn the IBM keyboard into a wireless USB connection?
    >Can I rewire it?
    >Is there a "modern" good keyboard?
    >
    > Mason C
    >
    >
  2. Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    I *love* those old keyboards... so much easier to type on..

    I will be very much looking forward to hearing if the adapter works...

    I know I hate the keyboards that HP and eMachines provide with their
    computers.. I am presently using a "Microsoft Internet Keyboard" on
    this Pavilion, which is one heck of a lot better than those provided
    by the computer companies, but it still is not as good as the older,
    coil-spring-under-each-key clicky-clack type keyboard..

    JM


    On Sun, 23 May 2004 04:25:39 GMT, ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net
    (Ben Myers) wrote:

    >Mason,
    >
    >I'm with you on the clickety-click 101-key old IBM keyboard. Hardware
    >designers seem to be messing with the chip that handles the keyboard, departing
    >from the old standard IC.
    >
    >Two suggestions:
    >
    >Try a PS/2-to-USB adapter and plug in the IBM keyboard that way. Let me know if
    >it works. The days of the PS/2 "legacy" keyboard connector are numbered.
    >
    >Try a newer IBM keyboard. Not nearly as sturdy, but not a bad touch. Dell
    >keyboards are decent, too. Not sure about the schlock you find in the retail
    >stores... Ben Myers
    >
  3. Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    On Sun, 23 May 2004 04:25:39 GMT, ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben
    Myers) wrote:

    >Mason,
    >
    >I'm with you on the clickety-click 101-key old IBM keyboard. Hardware
    >designers seem to be messing with the chip that handles the keyboard, departing
    >from the old standard IC.
    >
    >Two suggestions:
    >
    >Try a PS/2-to-USB adapter and plug in the IBM keyboard that way. Let me know if
    >it works. The days of the PS/2 "legacy" keyboard connector are numbered.

    I tried a simple five-buck adapter. I suspect a more sophisticated
    adapter would be needed. But also assume I'd need a driver -- not
    to be found. Maybe I'll explore the local Weird Stuff junk warehouse
    for a good keyboard. Buy a dozen for $12 and try them all.

    Or put a new motherboard in my P1 200Mhz and hope.

    >
    >Try a newer IBM keyboard. Not nearly as sturdy, but not a bad touch. Dell
    >keyboards are decent, too. Not sure about the schlock you find in the retail
    >stores... Ben Myers

    I tapped on the local schlock and got the best I found -- it's pretty bad.

    Isn't there some worker's safety law against these things?


    Thanks for the suggestions,

    Mason C
    >
    >On Sun, 23 May 2004 03:06:04 GMT, MasonC <masonc@ix.netcom.xyz.com> wrote:
    >
    >>It's time to ask again.
    >>
    >>My wonderful old IBM clickclack will not work on my HP 505n Pavilion.
    >>I tried three keyboards, none worked. They were a blue-label by
    >>Lexmark, the old IBM-M, and old Keytronics. All worked on
    >>my friend's HP Pavilion 764n. None work on my 505n.
    >>
    >> My motherboard failed recently (in warranty) and HP replaced it.
    >>They took 8 weeks but the good keyboards still don't work.
    >>
    >>I've tried "everything" including adding recommended two
    >>pull-up resistors.
    >>
    >>Anyone have any idea? My wrists can't stand modern keyboards.
    >>
    >>Can I turn the IBM keyboard into a wireless USB connection?
    >>Can I rewire it?
    >>Is there a "modern" good keyboard?
    >>
    >> Mason C
    >>
    >>
  4. Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    Ya know, a keyboard should NOT be this big a problem. Something else
    is going on here.

    Wild guess #1:
    Are you testing these keyboards by plugging them in and unplugging
    them with the computer turned on?
    If so, every one of them may very well be toast. "Hot" plugging a
    keyboard is the best way in the world to blow it out. You can hot plug
    a ps2 mouse, but not a keyboard. Always turn the computer off before
    plugging or unplugging a keyboard.

    Wild guess #2:
    Are you absolutely sure that you aren't plugging these things into
    your ps/2 MOUSE connector? After all. it's physically identical to the
    keyboard connector.
    That would nicely explain why none of them work on your system but
    work fine on your friend's system (whose mouse/keyboard connectors
    might be more clearly labeled)
  5. Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    Maon,

    PS/2-to-USB adapters are inherently simple devices. A small IC converts the
    signals from one interface to the other. Except for the larger, more
    complicated and more functional USB hubs, there is no need for more
    sophisticated technology here.

    No driver is required for any basic 101-key or 104-key (Windows!) keyboard. The
    keyboards with all the silly buttons on the top like the so-called internet
    keyboards and the other keyboards with special function keys and gizmos are the
    ones which require drivers to handle the new wave of great functionality. Gag!

    As a previous posting noted, there is something else going on here. I can't put
    my finger on it without fingering an actual system and keyboard. My guess is
    that HP has made a fundamental change in the keyboard circuitry and/or BIOS to
    lock people into their brand of keyboard. If so, here we go again with yet
    another attempt to lock people into proprietary garbage! It's the history of
    the computer industry... Ben Myers

    On Wed, 26 May 2004 08:00:17 GMT, Mason A. Clark <masoncNOT@THISix.netcom.comQ>
    wrote:

    >On Sun, 23 May 2004 04:25:39 GMT, ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben
    >Myers) wrote:
    >
    >>Mason,
    >>
    >>I'm with you on the clickety-click 101-key old IBM keyboard. Hardware
    >>designers seem to be messing with the chip that handles the keyboard, departing
    >>from the old standard IC.
    >>
    >>Two suggestions:
    >>
    >>Try a PS/2-to-USB adapter and plug in the IBM keyboard that way. Let me know if
    >>it works. The days of the PS/2 "legacy" keyboard connector are numbered.
    >
    >I tried a simple five-buck adapter. I suspect a more sophisticated
    >adapter would be needed. But also assume I'd need a driver -- not
    >to be found. Maybe I'll explore the local Weird Stuff junk warehouse
    >for a good keyboard. Buy a dozen for $12 and try them all.
    >
    >Or put a new motherboard in my P1 200Mhz and hope.
    >
    >>
    >>Try a newer IBM keyboard. Not nearly as sturdy, but not a bad touch. Dell
    >>keyboards are decent, too. Not sure about the schlock you find in the retail
    >>stores... Ben Myers
    >
    >I tapped on the local schlock and got the best I found -- it's pretty bad.
    >
    >Isn't there some worker's safety law against these things?
    >
    >
    > Thanks for the suggestions,
    >
    > Mason C
    >>
    >>On Sun, 23 May 2004 03:06:04 GMT, MasonC <masonc@ix.netcom.xyz.com> wrote:
    >>
    >>>It's time to ask again.
    >>>
    >>>My wonderful old IBM clickclack will not work on my HP 505n Pavilion.
    >>>I tried three keyboards, none worked. They were a blue-label by
    >>>Lexmark, the old IBM-M, and old Keytronics. All worked on
    >>>my friend's HP Pavilion 764n. None work on my 505n.
    >>>
    >>> My motherboard failed recently (in warranty) and HP replaced it.
    >>>They took 8 weeks but the good keyboards still don't work.
    >>>
    >>>I've tried "everything" including adding recommended two
    >>>pull-up resistors.
    >>>
    >>>Anyone have any idea? My wrists can't stand modern keyboards.
    >>>
    >>>Can I turn the IBM keyboard into a wireless USB connection?
    >>>Can I rewire it?
    >>>Is there a "modern" good keyboard?
    >>>
    >>> Mason C
    >>>
    >>>
    >
  6. Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    On Wed, 26 May 2004 09:38:32 GMT, Howd E. Doodat <Howd@freagin.happen> wrote:

    >
    >Ya know, a keyboard should NOT be this big a problem. Something else
    >is going on here.
    >
    >Wild guess #1:
    >Are you testing these keyboards by plugging them in and unplugging
    >them with the computer turned on?
    >If so, every one of them may very well be toast. "Hot" plugging a
    >keyboard is the best way in the world to blow it out. You can hot plug
    >a ps2 mouse, but not a keyboard. Always turn the computer off before
    >plugging or unplugging a keyboard.
    >
    >Wild guess #2:
    >Are you absolutely sure that you aren't plugging these things into
    >your ps/2 MOUSE connector? After all. it's physically identical to the
    >keyboard connector.
    >That would nicely explain why none of them work on your system but
    >work fine on your friend's system (whose mouse/keyboard connectors
    >might be more clearly labeled)
    >
    Put simply: none of the above is applicable.

    Maybe I didn't give enough detail in my last posts.

    In addition, I took the computer and keyboards to a competent
    repair shop and they had no better luck.

    I need more than "wild guesses".

    Mason C
  7. Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    On Wed, 26 May 2004 12:41:19 GMT, ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben
    Myers) wrote:

    >Maon,
    >
    >PS/2-to-USB adapters are inherently simple devices. A small IC converts the
    >signals from one interface to the other. Except for the larger, more
    >complicated and more functional USB hubs, there is no need for more
    >sophisticated technology here.
    >
    >No driver is required for any basic 101-key or 104-key (Windows!) keyboard. The
    >keyboards with all the silly buttons on the top like the so-called internet
    >keyboards and the other keyboards with special function keys and gizmos are the
    >ones which require drivers to handle the new wave of great functionality. Gag!
    >
    >As a previous posting noted, there is something else going on here. I can't put
    >my finger on it without fingering an actual system and keyboard. My guess is
    >that HP has made a fundamental change in the keyboard circuitry and/or BIOS to
    >lock people into their brand of keyboard. If so, here we go again with yet
    >another attempt to lock people into proprietary garbage! It's the history of
    >the computer industry... Ben Myers
    >

    However, right now I'm typing on a (squishy) Kensington keyboard on the HP
    Pavilion 505n. I have only had failure with the 1992 IBM M and an older similar
    Keytronics. The IBM is working perfectly on my old P1 200Mhz ASUS Win 98
    computer.

    Mason C
    \
    >On Wed, 26 May 2004 08:00:17 GMT, Mason A. Clark <masoncNOT@THISix.netcom.comQ>
    >wrote:
    >
    >>On Sun, 23 May 2004 04:25:39 GMT, ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben
    >>Myers) wrote:
    >>
    >>>Mason,
    >>>
    >>>I'm with you on the clickety-click 101-key old IBM keyboard. Hardware
    >>>designers seem to be messing with the chip that handles the keyboard, departing
    >>>from the old standard IC.
    >>>
    >>>Two suggestions:
    >>>
    >>>Try a PS/2-to-USB adapter and plug in the IBM keyboard that way. Let me know if
    >>>it works. The days of the PS/2 "legacy" keyboard connector are numbered.
    >>
    >>I tried a simple five-buck adapter. I suspect a more sophisticated
    >>adapter would be needed. But also assume I'd need a driver -- not
    >>to be found. Maybe I'll explore the local Weird Stuff junk warehouse
    >>for a good keyboard. Buy a dozen for $12 and try them all.
    >>
    >>Or put a new motherboard in my P1 200Mhz and hope.
    >>
    >>>
    >>>Try a newer IBM keyboard. Not nearly as sturdy, but not a bad touch. Dell
    >>>keyboards are decent, too. Not sure about the schlock you find in the retail
    >>>stores... Ben Myers
    >>
    >>I tapped on the local schlock and got the best I found -- it's pretty bad.
    >>
    >>Isn't there some worker's safety law against these things?
    >>
    >>
    >> Thanks for the suggestions,
    >>
    >> Mason C
    >>>
    >>>On Sun, 23 May 2004 03:06:04 GMT, MasonC <masonc@ix.netcom.xyz.com> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>It's time to ask again.
    >>>>
    >>>>My wonderful old IBM clickclack will not work on my HP 505n Pavilion.
    >>>>I tried three keyboards, none worked. They were a blue-label by
    >>>>Lexmark, the old IBM-M, and old Keytronics. All worked on
    >>>>my friend's HP Pavilion 764n. None work on my 505n.
    >>>>
    >>>> My motherboard failed recently (in warranty) and HP replaced it.
    >>>>They took 8 weeks but the good keyboards still don't work.
    >>>>
    >>>>I've tried "everything" including adding recommended two
    >>>>pull-up resistors.
    >>>>
    >>>>Anyone have any idea? My wrists can't stand modern keyboards.
    >>>>
    >>>>Can I turn the IBM keyboard into a wireless USB connection?
    >>>>Can I rewire it?
    >>>>Is there a "modern" good keyboard?
    >>>>
    >>>> Mason C
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>
  8. Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    "Mason A. Clark" <masoncNOT@THISix.netcom.comQ> wrote in message
    news:rjv9b0t3sog02vigj0j9iguh4eok6r2sov@4ax.com...
    > >
    >
    > However, right now I'm typing on a (squishy) Kensington keyboard on the HP
    > Pavilion 505n. I have only had failure with the 1992 IBM M and an older
    similar
    > Keytronics. The IBM is working perfectly on my old P1 200Mhz ASUS Win 98
    > computer.
    >
    > Mason C
    > \

    Mason,

    Unless I missed the details in a post I didn't see, Is your problem that the
    keyboard doesn't work in Windows?

    Does it work while booting? Can you go into the BIOS setup?

    If the keyboard works in the BIOS setup and not in windows, it probably
    indicates the BIOS and electrical connections are OK.

    If it fails in Windows, is the multimedia keyboard driver still being
    loaded? Can you boot into safe mode where most drivers are not loaded?

    It is possible that a multimedia keyboard driver is causing the problem?
    You'll have to provide the information that tells us what is happening.

    As the computer starts up, do you see the keyboard lights flash as the
    keyboard is reset?

    Does the BIOS report the keyboard as it starts? You may have to try this
    with a keyboard that works and the one that doesn't to see if any
    differences are reported.

    Perhaps the answers to these questions will help others point you in the
    right direction.

    craigm
  9. Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    Mason,

    All we have around our office and house are computers with old IBM 101-key
    clicky keyboards. Whenever I have a spare moment (almost never), I clean them
    up and sell them with all brands of refurb gear. I use one to test new
    brand-name computers, and to work with all the computers loaded with spyware and
    browser hijackers that show up here for repair. But every so often, a computer
    refuses to work with the IBM keyboard. I have not kept track of exactly which
    brands and models, but $#it happens.

    My best guess still remains that HP has somehow departed from a long-time
    standard with the 505n. Another reason not by an HP? Because it won't work
    reliably with non-HP keyboards? Go figure... Ben Myers

    On Wed, 26 May 2004 20:35:17 GMT, Mason A. Clark <masoncNOT@THISix.netcom.comQ>
    wrote:

    >On Wed, 26 May 2004 12:41:19 GMT, ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben
    >Myers) wrote:
    >
    >>Maon,
    >>
    >>PS/2-to-USB adapters are inherently simple devices. A small IC converts the
    >>signals from one interface to the other. Except for the larger, more
    >>complicated and more functional USB hubs, there is no need for more
    >>sophisticated technology here.
    >>
    >>No driver is required for any basic 101-key or 104-key (Windows!) keyboard. The
    >>keyboards with all the silly buttons on the top like the so-called internet
    >>keyboards and the other keyboards with special function keys and gizmos are the
    >>ones which require drivers to handle the new wave of great functionality. Gag!
    >>
    >>As a previous posting noted, there is something else going on here. I can't put
    >>my finger on it without fingering an actual system and keyboard. My guess is
    >>that HP has made a fundamental change in the keyboard circuitry and/or BIOS to
    >>lock people into their brand of keyboard. If so, here we go again with yet
    >>another attempt to lock people into proprietary garbage! It's the history of
    >>the computer industry... Ben Myers
    >>
    >
    >However, right now I'm typing on a (squishy) Kensington keyboard on the HP
    >Pavilion 505n. I have only had failure with the 1992 IBM M and an older similar
    >Keytronics. The IBM is working perfectly on my old P1 200Mhz ASUS Win 98
    >computer.
    >
    > Mason C
    >\
    >>On Wed, 26 May 2004 08:00:17 GMT, Mason A. Clark <masoncNOT@THISix.netcom.comQ>
    >>wrote:
    >>
    >>>On Sun, 23 May 2004 04:25:39 GMT, ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben
    >>>Myers) wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>Mason,
    >>>>
    >>>>I'm with you on the clickety-click 101-key old IBM keyboard. Hardware
    >>>>designers seem to be messing with the chip that handles the keyboard, departing
    >>>>from the old standard IC.
    >>>>
    >>>>Two suggestions:
    >>>>
    >>>>Try a PS/2-to-USB adapter and plug in the IBM keyboard that way. Let me know if
    >>>>it works. The days of the PS/2 "legacy" keyboard connector are numbered.
    >>>
    >>>I tried a simple five-buck adapter. I suspect a more sophisticated
    >>>adapter would be needed. But also assume I'd need a driver -- not
    >>>to be found. Maybe I'll explore the local Weird Stuff junk warehouse
    >>>for a good keyboard. Buy a dozen for $12 and try them all.
    >>>
    >>>Or put a new motherboard in my P1 200Mhz and hope.
    >>>
    >>>>
    >>>>Try a newer IBM keyboard. Not nearly as sturdy, but not a bad touch. Dell
    >>>>keyboards are decent, too. Not sure about the schlock you find in the retail
    >>>>stores... Ben Myers
    >>>
    >>>I tapped on the local schlock and got the best I found -- it's pretty bad.
    >>>
    >>>Isn't there some worker's safety law against these things?
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Thanks for the suggestions,
    >>>
    >>> Mason C
    >>>>
    >>>>On Sun, 23 May 2004 03:06:04 GMT, MasonC <masonc@ix.netcom.xyz.com> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>>It's time to ask again.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>My wonderful old IBM clickclack will not work on my HP 505n Pavilion.
    >>>>>I tried three keyboards, none worked. They were a blue-label by
    >>>>>Lexmark, the old IBM-M, and old Keytronics. All worked on
    >>>>>my friend's HP Pavilion 764n. None work on my 505n.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> My motherboard failed recently (in warranty) and HP replaced it.
    >>>>>They took 8 weeks but the good keyboards still don't work.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>I've tried "everything" including adding recommended two
    >>>>>pull-up resistors.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>Anyone have any idea? My wrists can't stand modern keyboards.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>Can I turn the IBM keyboard into a wireless USB connection?
    >>>>>Can I rewire it?
    >>>>>Is there a "modern" good keyboard?
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Mason C
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>
    >
  10. Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    Good thinking and excellent suggestions for all to remember! ... Ben Myers

    On Wed, 26 May 2004 17:58:49 -0500, "craigm" <none@domain.invalid> wrote:

    >
    >"Mason A. Clark" <masoncNOT@THISix.netcom.comQ> wrote in message
    >news:rjv9b0t3sog02vigj0j9iguh4eok6r2sov@4ax.com...
    >> >
    >>
    >> However, right now I'm typing on a (squishy) Kensington keyboard on the HP
    >> Pavilion 505n. I have only had failure with the 1992 IBM M and an older
    >similar
    >> Keytronics. The IBM is working perfectly on my old P1 200Mhz ASUS Win 98
    >> computer.
    >>
    >> Mason C
    >> \
    >
    >Mason,
    >
    >Unless I missed the details in a post I didn't see, Is your problem that the
    >keyboard doesn't work in Windows?
    >
    >Does it work while booting? Can you go into the BIOS setup?
    >
    >If the keyboard works in the BIOS setup and not in windows, it probably
    >indicates the BIOS and electrical connections are OK.
    >
    >If it fails in Windows, is the multimedia keyboard driver still being
    >loaded? Can you boot into safe mode where most drivers are not loaded?
    >
    >It is possible that a multimedia keyboard driver is causing the problem?
    >You'll have to provide the information that tells us what is happening.
    >
    >As the computer starts up, do you see the keyboard lights flash as the
    >keyboard is reset?
    >
    >Does the BIOS report the keyboard as it starts? You may have to try this
    >with a keyboard that works and the one that doesn't to see if any
    >differences are reported.
    >
    >Perhaps the answers to these questions will help others point you in the
    >right direction.
    >
    >craigm
    >
    >
  11. Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    On Wed, 26 May 2004 20:52:11 GMT, ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net
    (Ben Myers) wrote:

    >
    >My best guess still remains that HP has somehow departed from a long-time
    >standard with the 505n. Another reason not by an HP? Because it won't work
    >reliably with non-HP keyboards? Go figure... Ben Myers

    Jeeezzz..."It's deja vu all over again" (Thanks, Yogi)

    Anybody have a copy of "Microsoft Keyboard Simulator"?

    You cyberkids will say "What the hell is he talking about?"

    You cyberfogies will understand, and simply smile.... ;-)
  12. Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    On Wed, 26 May 2004 20:30:12 GMT, Mason A. Clark
    <masoncNOT@THISix.netcom.comQ> wrote:

    >On Wed, 26 May 2004 09:38:32 GMT, Howd E. Doodat <Howd@freagin.happen> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>Ya know, a keyboard should NOT be this big a problem. Something else
    >>is going on here.
    >>
    >>Wild guess #1:
    >>Are you testing these keyboards by plugging them in and unplugging
    >>them with the computer turned on?
    >>If so, every one of them may very well be toast. "Hot" plugging a
    >>keyboard is the best way in the world to blow it out. You can hot plug
    >>a ps2 mouse, but not a keyboard. Always turn the computer off before
    >>plugging or unplugging a keyboard.
    >>
    >>Wild guess #2:
    >>Are you absolutely sure that you aren't plugging these things into
    >>your ps/2 MOUSE connector? After all. it's physically identical to the
    >>keyboard connector.
    >>That would nicely explain why none of them work on your system but
    >>work fine on your friend's system (whose mouse/keyboard connectors
    >>might be more clearly labeled)
    >>
    >Put simply: none of the above is applicable.

    Put simply, in the process of troubleshooting, elimination is far more
    important than suspicion.

    >Maybe I didn't give enough detail in my last posts.

    I would call this a fact.

    >In addition, I took the computer and keyboards to a competent
    >repair shop and they had no better luck.
    >
    >I need more than "wild guesses".

    In the absence of substantive descriptions of your problem, I'm afraid
    "wild guesses" are all I had to start the bidding with.

    Sorry if I disturbed you. I'll go away now.
  13. Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    Try Unicomp's Online Store at pckeyboard.com got mine from them . Has that
    "clickety-clack" sound and old IBM keyboard feel to the keys

    cl

    "Mason A. Clark" <masoncNOT@THISix.netcom.comQ> wrote in message
    news:uaj8b0lh61cg0t820opokuj75bmc062kkb@4ax.com...
    > On Sun, 23 May 2004 04:25:39 GMT, ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben
    > Myers) wrote:
    >
    > >Mason,
    > >
    > >I'm with you on the clickety-click 101-key old IBM keyboard. Hardware
    > >designers seem to be messing with the chip that handles the keyboard,
    departing
    > >from the old standard IC.
    > >
    > >Two suggestions:
    > >
    > >Try a PS/2-to-USB adapter and plug in the IBM keyboard that way. Let me
    know if
    > >it works. The days of the PS/2 "legacy" keyboard connector are numbered.
    >
    > I tried a simple five-buck adapter. I suspect a more sophisticated
    > adapter would be needed. But also assume I'd need a driver -- not
    > to be found. Maybe I'll explore the local Weird Stuff junk warehouse
    > for a good keyboard. Buy a dozen for $12 and try them all.
    >
    > Or put a new motherboard in my P1 200Mhz and hope.
    >
    > >
    > >Try a newer IBM keyboard. Not nearly as sturdy, but not a bad touch.
    Dell
    > >keyboards are decent, too. Not sure about the schlock you find in the
    retail
    > >stores... Ben Myers
    >
    > I tapped on the local schlock and got the best I found -- it's pretty bad.
    >
    > Isn't there some worker's safety law against these things?
    >
    >
    > Thanks for the suggestions,
    >
    > Mason C
    > >
    > >On Sun, 23 May 2004 03:06:04 GMT, MasonC <masonc@ix.netcom.xyz.com>
    wrote:
    > >
    > >>It's time to ask again.
    > >>
    > >>My wonderful old IBM clickclack will not work on my HP 505n Pavilion.
    > >>I tried three keyboards, none worked. They were a blue-label by
    > >>Lexmark, the old IBM-M, and old Keytronics. All worked on
    > >>my friend's HP Pavilion 764n. None work on my 505n.
    > >>
    > >> My motherboard failed recently (in warranty) and HP replaced it.
    > >>They took 8 weeks but the good keyboards still don't work.
    > >>
    > >>I've tried "everything" including adding recommended two
    > >>pull-up resistors.
    > >>
    > >>Anyone have any idea? My wrists can't stand modern keyboards.
    > >>
    > >>Can I turn the IBM keyboard into a wireless USB connection?
    > >>Can I rewire it?
    > >>Is there a "modern" good keyboard?
    > >>
    > >> Mason C
    > >>
    > >>
    >
  14. Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    On Wed, 26 May 2004 17:58:49 -0500, "craigm" <none@domain.invalid> wrote:

    >
    >"Mason A. Clark" <masoncNOT@THISix.netcom.comQ> wrote in message
    >news:rjv9b0t3sog02vigj0j9iguh4eok6r2sov@4ax.com...
    >> >
    >>
    >> However, right now I'm typing on a (squishy) Kensington keyboard on the HP
    >> Pavilion 505n. I have only had failure with the 1992 IBM M and an older
    >similar
    >> Keytronics. The IBM is working perfectly on my old P1 200Mhz ASUS Win 98
    >> computer.
    >>
    >> Mason C
    >> \
    >
    >Mason,
    >
    >Unless I missed the details in a post I didn't see, Is your problem that the
    >keyboard doesn't work in Windows?

    Apparently so.
    >
    >Does it work while booting? Can you go into the BIOS setup?

    From the XP floppy boot-up disk, IT WORKS! There's hope.
    I never thought of trying that. But I go nowhere from there.
    >
    >If the keyboard works in the BIOS setup and not in windows, it probably
    >indicates the BIOS and electrical connections are OK.

    Looks that way.
    >
    >If it fails in Windows, is the multimedia keyboard driver still being
    >loaded? Can you boot into safe mode where most drivers are not loaded?
    >
    HP driver is there. So I uninstalled it (praying that I could get it back :-)

    (it did come back instantly via plug-n-play)

    >It is possible that a multimedia keyboard driver is causing the problem?
    >You'll have to provide the information that tells us what is happening.

    Seems possible, but uninstalling it leaves me with nothing.

    Now my problem is how to drive the IBM keyboard from Windows XP.
    I've rounded up the usual suspects:
    Plug-n-Play didn't. New Hardware Install didn't -- nothing to do there.

    I tried the PS2-USB adapter to force Plug-n-Play but nothing happened.
    (I have little faith in this $4.79 adapter.)

    >
    >As the computer starts up, do you see the keyboard lights flash as the
    >keyboard is reset?

    In XP the Num Lock light comes on; *nothing* else is active on the keyboard.
    >
    >Does the BIOS report the keyboard as it starts? You may have to try this
    >with a keyboard that works and the one that doesn't to see if any
    >differences are reported.
    >
    >Perhaps the answers to these questions will help others point you in the
    >right direction.
    >
    >craigm

    Hey, you've got me one foot in the door -- it works on the computer but not
    in Windows XP. Thank you !

    Mason C now one more foot
    >
  15. Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    On Fri, 28 May 2004 22:09:54 GMT, Mason A. Clark <masoncNOT@THISix.netcom.comQ>
    wrote:

    >On Wed, 26 May 2004 17:58:49 -0500, "craigm" <none@domain.invalid> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>"Mason A. Clark" <masoncNOT@THISix.netcom.comQ> wrote in message
    >>news:rjv9b0t3sog02vigj0j9iguh4eok6r2sov@4ax.com...
    >>> >
    >>>
    >>> However, right now I'm typing on a (squishy) Kensington keyboard on the HP
    >>> Pavilion 505n. I have only had failure with the 1992 IBM M and an older
    >>similar
    >>> Keytronics. The IBM is working perfectly on my old P1 200Mhz ASUS Win 98
    >>> computer.
    >>>
    >>> Mason C
    >>> \
    >>
    >>Mason,
    >>
    >>Unless I missed the details in a post I didn't see, Is your problem that the
    >>keyboard doesn't work in Windows?
    >
    >Apparently so.
    >>
    >>Does it work while booting? Can you go into the BIOS setup?
    >
    >From the XP floppy boot-up disk, IT WORKS! There's hope.
    >I never thought of trying that. But I go nowhere from there.
    >>
    >>If the keyboard works in the BIOS setup and not in windows, it probably
    >>indicates the BIOS and electrical connections are OK.
    >
    >Looks that way.
    >>
    >>If it fails in Windows, is the multimedia keyboard driver still being
    >>loaded? Can you boot into safe mode where most drivers are not loaded?
    >>
    >HP driver is there. So I uninstalled it (praying that I could get it back :-)
    >
    >(it did come back instantly via plug-n-play)
    >
    >>It is possible that a multimedia keyboard driver is causing the problem?
    >>You'll have to provide the information that tells us what is happening.
    >
    >Seems possible, but uninstalling it leaves me with nothing.
    >
    >Now my problem is how to drive the IBM keyboard from Windows XP.
    >I've rounded up the usual suspects:
    >Plug-n-Play didn't. New Hardware Install didn't -- nothing to do there.
    >
    >I tried the PS2-USB adapter to force Plug-n-Play but nothing happened.
    >(I have little faith in this $4.79 adapter.)
    >
    >>
    >>As the computer starts up, do you see the keyboard lights flash as the
    >>keyboard is reset?
    >
    >In XP the Num Lock light comes on; *nothing* else is active on the keyboard.
    >>
    >>Does the BIOS report the keyboard as it starts? You may have to try this
    >>with a keyboard that works and the one that doesn't to see if any
    >>differences are reported.
    >>
    >>Perhaps the answers to these questions will help others point you in the
    >>right direction.
    >>
    >>craigm
    >
    >Hey, you've got me one foot in the door -- it works on the computer but not
    >in Windows XP. Thank you !
    >
    > Mason C now one more foot


    OK, here's one more toe, net yet a foot:

    I switched from the HP PS2 driver to "Standard 101/102-key... " driver.

    Now it boots up a live keyboard (lights flash, NumLock etc lights
    are controllable) --- UNTIL the "HP Invent" screen comes on.
    At that point the keyboard is nul and void. The "Device Manager"
    does not display the presence of any keyboard and all effort to
    install one fails.

    HP has invented something. Now if I could bypass that HP screen maybe
    XP would accept the keyboard ???

    Mason C
  16. Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    Sure sounds like a bad keyboard controller chip to me, but what do I
    know?
  17. Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    On Sat, 29 May 2004 03:47:33 GMT, Howd E. Doodat <Howd@freagin.happen> wrote:

    >
    >Sure sounds like a bad keyboard controller chip to me, but what do I
    >know?
    >
    For a different reason the mother board was replaced. Not likely to
    be hardware. The keyboard works in DOS.

    Mason
  18. Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    On Sat, 29 May 2004 04:39:26 GMT, Mason A. Clark
    <masoncNOT@THISix.netcom.comQ> wrote:

    >On Sat, 29 May 2004 03:47:33 GMT, Howd E. Doodat <Howd@freagin.happen> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>Sure sounds like a bad keyboard controller chip to me, but what do I
    >>know?
    >>
    >For a different reason the mother board was replaced. Not likely to
    >be hardware. The keyboard works in DOS.
    >
    > Mason

    Okay. So i may assume then that all the keyboards worked just fine
    BEFORE you got the new motherboard?

    You've tried a usb adaptor. Did you also enable the "usb keyboard" in
    BIOS when you did it?

    One last wild guess (I know how much you love them!): If your BIOS has
    a setting for "Plug'n'play aware OS", try turning the damned thing OFF
    and see what happems.

    Re the last 2 paragraphs, not all BIOS have these options.
  19. Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    On Sat, 29 May 2004 07:01:05 GMT, Howd E. Doodat <Howd@freagin.happen> wrote:

    >On Sat, 29 May 2004 04:39:26 GMT, Mason A. Clark
    ><masoncNOT@THISix.netcom.comQ> wrote:
    >
    >>On Sat, 29 May 2004 03:47:33 GMT, Howd E. Doodat <Howd@freagin.happen> wrote:
    >>
    >>>
    >>>Sure sounds like a bad keyboard controller chip to me, but what do I
    >>>know?
    >>>
    >>For a different reason the mother board was replaced. Not likely to
    >>be hardware. The keyboard works in DOS.
    >>
    >> Mason
    >
    >Okay. So i may assume then that all the keyboards worked just fine
    >BEFORE you got the new motherboard?

    No no no. Keyboard problem unchanged by new motherboard.
    >
    >You've tried a usb adaptor. Did you also enable the "usb keyboard" in
    >BIOS when you did it?
    >
    >One last wild guess (I know how much you love them!): If your BIOS has
    >a setting for "Plug'n'play aware OS", try turning the damned thing OFF
    >and see what happems.
    >
    >Re the last 2 paragraphs, not all BIOS have these options.

    Thanks for the suggestion. I'll investigate tomorrow morning.
    I don't remember seeing any way to turn off Plug'n'play.

    Mason C
  20. Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    Mason,

    In addition to adding an HP splash screen to Windows, it almost seems as if HP
    has modified the standard Windows startup to impose its keyboard driver, and
    ONLY its keyboard driver. If you have an appetite for experimentation and can
    easily get your hands on a standard Windows XP Home (???) CD, try a reinstall of
    Windows XP Home over the existing software. The reinstall should detect the
    101-key clicky keyboard, install the right driver and maybe even override the HP
    splash screen and other HP rubbish... Ben Myers

    On Sat, 29 May 2004 03:17:17 GMT, Mason A. Clark <masoncNOT@THISix.netcom.comQ>
    wrote:

    <SNIP>
    >> Mason C now one more foot
    >
    >
    >OK, here's one more toe, net yet a foot:
    >
    >I switched from the HP PS2 driver to "Standard 101/102-key... " driver.
    >
    >Now it boots up a live keyboard (lights flash, NumLock etc lights
    >are controllable) --- UNTIL the "HP Invent" screen comes on.
    >At that point the keyboard is nul and void. The "Device Manager"
    >does not display the presence of any keyboard and all effort to
    >install one fails.
    >
    >HP has invented something. Now if I could bypass that HP screen maybe
    >XP would accept the keyboard ???
    >
    > Mason C
    >
    >
  21. Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    >
    >Thanks for the suggestion. I'll investigate tomorrow morning.
    >I don't remember seeing any way to turn off Plug'n'play.
    >
    > Mason C


    One more not-quite-idle question, in your "device manager", do you
    hapen to have any device conflicts ("yellow exclamation points")?
  22. Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    Yet another comment: The Pavilion 505n uses a Trigem Glendale motherboard with
    Intel 845 chipset. I have run many 845 chipset systems with an old reliable
    101-key clicky-clack IBM keyboard. One of them is my primary keyboard for
    servicing computers on the bench. This points to two possibilities. Either the
    Trigem Glendale BIOS is cobbled up so that the IBM 101 won't work with it, or
    the HP version of Windows XPee has been screwed around with by HP. I'll vote
    for the latter, especially in view of the fact that the IBM 101 works just fine
    with the Pavilion during BIOS setup and in DOS mode.

    Let me suggest one more easy thing to try. Does the Trigem Glendale BIOS have a
    CMOS reset menu choice? If so, reset the CMOS, power down, attach the IBM 101,
    and see what happens next. Next thing to try would be to remove the CMOS
    battery for an hour or two, then plug in the IBM 101, re-esatblish the correct
    CMOS settings and see what happens.

    Finally, you can download an interesting little program from the Gateway web
    site to reset the PLUG-AND-PLAY settings, which are different from the CMOS
    settings. The PnP settings are actually stored off in a part of the flash
    memory dedicated to this purpose, following the joint Intel-Microsoft (who
    else?) plug-and-play spec. If memory serves me well, the program is
    ESCSD<something or other>.ZIP . Blowing away the PnP settings will cause
    Windows to go thru all the girations of detecting all its devices again... Ben
    Myers

    On Sun, 23 May 2004 03:06:04 GMT, MasonC <masonc@ix.netcom.xyz.com> wrote:

    >It's time to ask again.
    >
    >My wonderful old IBM clickclack will not work on my HP 505n Pavilion.
    >I tried three keyboards, none worked. They were a blue-label by
    >Lexmark, the old IBM-M, and old Keytronics. All worked on
    >my friend's HP Pavilion 764n. None work on my 505n.
    >
    > My motherboard failed recently (in warranty) and HP replaced it.
    >They took 8 weeks but the good keyboards still don't work.
    >
    >I've tried "everything" including adding recommended two
    >pull-up resistors.
    >
    >Anyone have any idea? My wrists can't stand modern keyboards.
    >
    >Can I turn the IBM keyboard into a wireless USB connection?
    >Can I rewire it?
    >Is there a "modern" good keyboard?
    >
    > Mason C
    >
    >
  23. Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    Oooh, a new toy for the toybox....

    (laughter)

    JM

    On Sat, 29 May 2004 23:14:39 GMT, ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net
    (Ben Myers) wrote:
    <snip some good stuff>
    >Finally, you can download an interesting little program from the Gateway web
    >site to reset the PLUG-AND-PLAY settings, which are different from the CMOS
    >settings. The PnP settings are actually stored off in a part of the flash
    >memory dedicated to this purpose, following the joint Intel-Microsoft (who
    >else?) plug-and-play spec. If memory serves me well, the program is
    >ESCSD<something or other>.ZIP . Blowing away the PnP settings will cause
    >Windows to go thru all the girations of detecting all its devices again... Ben
    >Myers
  24. Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    Actually, the file is called CLRESCSD.EXE . It may not be on the Gateway web
    site any more. It may not be necessary if a clear CMOS jumper also clears the
    ESCD (Extended System Configuration Data). If anybody wants a copy of this
    file and cannot find it on the web, email me and I'll send out a copy.

    .... Ben Myers

    On Sat, 29 May 2004 18:50:46 -0700, JustMee <me@nowhere.com.invalid> wrote:

    >Oooh, a new toy for the toybox....
    >
    >(laughter)
    >
    >JM
    >
    >On Sat, 29 May 2004 23:14:39 GMT, ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net
    >(Ben Myers) wrote:
    ><snip some good stuff>
    >>Finally, you can download an interesting little program from the Gateway web
    >>site to reset the PLUG-AND-PLAY settings, which are different from the CMOS
    >>settings. The PnP settings are actually stored off in a part of the flash
    >>memory dedicated to this purpose, following the joint Intel-Microsoft (who
    >>else?) plug-and-play spec. If memory serves me well, the program is
    >>ESCSD<something or other>.ZIP . Blowing away the PnP settings will cause
    >>Windows to go thru all the girations of detecting all its devices again... Ben
    >>Myers
    >
  25. Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    On Sun, 23 May 2004 03:06:04 GMT, MasonC <masonc@ix.netcom.xyz.com> wrote:

    >It's time to ask again.
    >
    >My wonderful old IBM clickclack will not work on my HP 505n Pavilion.

    ALMOST THERE ! Pardon my shout.

    I'm typing on my old IBM right now.

    The trick is this:

    At the "HP Invent" splash screen, press F1 to enter Setup.
    ( the keyboard is functioning up to this point )

    Set "Reset configuration data" to [YES] -- the secret --

    ( Plug'n'Play is set to [YES] and I don't think it
    has any effect either way.)

    The HP splash returns and it boots with the IBM keyboard OK.

    However, the "Reset configuration data" resets itself to [NO] and
    must be reset *each* time. (I've booted many times....ugh)

    I'll operate this way but hope for a permanent fix.

    Ben, I downloaded CLRESCSD.exe at:

    ftp://ftp.gw2k.com/pub/hardware_support/bios/pentium/clrescsd.exe

    But I'm too scared to run it -- especially if it's not the solution.
    What do you think? Is it a P'n'P problem or "configuration data"?

    Anyway, I'm on the keyboard, thanks to the suggestions
    of everybody, especially *craigm* and ben_myers.

    Thank you much much, merci beaucoup, gracias etc etc

    Mason C
  26. Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    Mason,

    Run CLRESCSD.exe from a DOS box and use it to prepare a floppy which must be
    booted and run at the DOS prompt. For XP, this may be a problem. You may have
    to make up a bootable 95/98/ME floppy first, then use CLRESCSD.exe to finish
    making up the required floppy.

    Running the resulting floppy will give you choices to do things to the ESCD.
    You want to reset it. This may accomplish the same thing as resetting the
    configuration data from the BIOS.

    From what you've described, it almost seems like the HP version of software
    manages somehow to reset the ESCD back again at system shutdown to use the
    stinking HP keyboard.

    "Reset configuration data" always resets itself to [NO] after resetting. This
    is a feature of almost any BIOS. It is normal to assume that the config data
    will not be reset every time the system boots... Ben

    On Sun, 30 May 2004 07:55:53 GMT, Mason A. Clark <masoncNOT@THISix.netcom.comQ>
    wrote:

    >On Sun, 23 May 2004 03:06:04 GMT, MasonC <masonc@ix.netcom.xyz.com> wrote:
    >
    >>It's time to ask again.
    >>
    >>My wonderful old IBM clickclack will not work on my HP 505n Pavilion.
    >
    >ALMOST THERE ! Pardon my shout.
    >
    >I'm typing on my old IBM right now.
    >
    >The trick is this:
    >
    >At the "HP Invent" splash screen, press F1 to enter Setup.
    > ( the keyboard is functioning up to this point )
    >
    >Set "Reset configuration data" to [YES] -- the secret --
    >
    > ( Plug'n'Play is set to [YES] and I don't think it
    > has any effect either way.)
    >
    >The HP splash returns and it boots with the IBM keyboard OK.
    >
    >However, the "Reset configuration data" resets itself to [NO] and
    >must be reset *each* time. (I've booted many times....ugh)
    >
    >I'll operate this way but hope for a permanent fix.
    >
    >Ben, I downloaded CLRESCSD.exe at:
    >
    > ftp://ftp.gw2k.com/pub/hardware_support/bios/pentium/clrescsd.exe
    >
    >But I'm too scared to run it -- especially if it's not the solution.
    >What do you think? Is it a P'n'P problem or "configuration data"?
    >
    >Anyway, I'm on the keyboard, thanks to the suggestions
    >of everybody, especially *craigm* and ben_myers.
    >
    > Thank you much much, merci beaucoup, gracias etc etc
    >
    > Mason C
  27. Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    Ben,

    Because it persistently requires reset of the ESCD, I'm guessing that to
    reset the ESCD in *any* way will be futile -- requiring reset at each cold boot.

    My neighbor gave me another IBM model M and it also fails on the
    HP computer -- needing a reset of ESCD.

    Also an AT/XT keyboard made by EPC in Taiwan. It looks like an IBM; works
    fine and feels good. Not as noisy as IBM's but far superior to the retail
    keyboards I see ( feel ) in the stores today. And the old layout.

    I'll settle for this near thing. If I have serious typing I can always boot
    up to a click/clack IBM. Time out on this.

    Thanks again,

    Mason C


    On Sun, 30 May 2004 21:00:20 GMT, ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben
    Myers) wrote:

    >Mason,
    >
    >Run CLRESCSD.exe from a DOS box and use it to prepare a floppy which must be
    >booted and run at the DOS prompt. For XP, this may be a problem. You may have
    >to make up a bootable 95/98/ME floppy first, then use CLRESCSD.exe to finish
    >making up the required floppy.
    >
    >Running the resulting floppy will give you choices to do things to the ESCD.
    >You want to reset it. This may accomplish the same thing as resetting the
    >configuration data from the BIOS.
    >
    >From what you've described, it almost seems like the HP version of software
    >manages somehow to reset the ESCD back again at system shutdown to use the
    >stinking HP keyboard.
    >
    >"Reset configuration data" always resets itself to [NO] after resetting. This
    >is a feature of almost any BIOS. It is normal to assume that the config data
    >will not be reset every time the system boots... Ben
    >
    >On Sun, 30 May 2004 07:55:53 GMT, Mason A. Clark <masoncNOT@THISix.netcom.comQ>
    >wrote:
    >
    >>On Sun, 23 May 2004 03:06:04 GMT, MasonC <masonc@ix.netcom.xyz.com> wrote:
    >>
    >>>It's time to ask again.
    >>>
    >>>My wonderful old IBM clickclack will not work on my HP 505n Pavilion.
    >>
    >>ALMOST THERE ! Pardon my shout.
    >>
    >>I'm typing on my old IBM right now.
    >>
    >>The trick is this:
    >>
    >>At the "HP Invent" splash screen, press F1 to enter Setup.
    >> ( the keyboard is functioning up to this point )
    >>
    >>Set "Reset configuration data" to [YES] -- the secret --
    >>
    >> ( Plug'n'Play is set to [YES] and I don't think it
    >> has any effect either way.)
    >>
    >>The HP splash returns and it boots with the IBM keyboard OK.
    >>
    >>However, the "Reset configuration data" resets itself to [NO] and
    >>must be reset *each* time. (I've booted many times....ugh)
    >>
    >>I'll operate this way but hope for a permanent fix.
    >>
    >>Ben, I downloaded CLRESCSD.exe at:
    >>
    >> ftp://ftp.gw2k.com/pub/hardware_support/bios/pentium/clrescsd.exe
    >>
    >>But I'm too scared to run it -- especially if it's not the solution.
    >>What do you think? Is it a P'n'P problem or "configuration data"?
    >>
    >>Anyway, I'm on the keyboard, thanks to the suggestions
    >>of everybody, especially *craigm* and ben_myers.
    >>
    >> Thank you much much, merci beaucoup, gracias etc etc
    >>
    >> Mason C
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