linksys WAP54G connection problem

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

Hello
This is my setup:
ADSL modem connected to a 4-port switch, then the linksys WAP54G (with
newest firmware) connects to that, and also 2 other computers. The WAP54G
serves 3 laptops around the house.

The laptops connect to the access point with no problems, but they don't
have a connection to the internet. So I tried to connect to the access point
via the web interface (with the standard 192.168.1.245 address that is set
for it) from one of the wired computers, and I couldn't. It times out. So I
loaded the Linksys Setup Wizard, and when it searches the network for a
linksys machine, it doesn't find it. So I'm wondering whether it's because
the modem isn't assigning an IP address to the access point or whether it's
some hardware problem with the ethernet connection.
By the way, the switch shows the link light as on, when the access point is
connected, so the connection is there, just no communication. Oh, and when I
send a ping to 192.168.1.245 the "Link/Act" light on the access point blinks
twice, and then the ping times out after about 2 seconds, then it blinks
twice again, and the ping times out, and it could go on forever like that.
This makes me wonder then whether something is blocking the communication.

thanks for the help!
20 answers Last reply
More about linksys wap54g connection problem
  1. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Taking a moment's reflection, d.p. mused:
    |
    | Hello
    | This is my setup:
    | ADSL modem connected to a 4-port switch, then the linksys WAP54G (with
    | newest firmware) connects to that, and also 2 other computers. The WAP54G
    | serves 3 laptops around the house.

    What are you using for DHCP? If using static IPs, what are you using
    for NAT ... assuming you are sharing the xDSL connection among all of the
    computers? Regarding the WAP54G specifically, it does not perform any of
    those functions above. Also, in order to connect to its web configuration
    page, you'll need to be in the same IP range and subnet. It is generally
    recommended to do all configuration of wireless components with a wired
    connection (i.e.. computer connected to router, WAP54G connected to same
    router).
  2. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    the ADSL modem is the DHCP server. It is connected to the 5th "in" port on
    the switch. All the other components are connected via that switch as well
    using the normal ports These components are the linksys access point and two
    wired computers. The laptops use wireless, and also get their IP's from the
    modem. The access point is just a "pass-through" in a sense. NAT is used and
    the IP range that's used is the standard 192.168.1.x.
    I connect to the wireless access point using a wired computer, via the
    switch.
    Everything has been working great in the past. It just recently started
    acting like this.


    "mhicaoidh" <®êmõvé_mhic_aoidh@hotÑîXmailSPäM.com> wrote in message
    news:H4MRc.274322$Oq2.58050@attbi_s52...
    > Taking a moment's reflection, d.p. mused:
    > |
    > | Hello
    > | This is my setup:
    > | ADSL modem connected to a 4-port switch, then the linksys WAP54G (with
    > | newest firmware) connects to that, and also 2 other computers. The
    WAP54G
    > | serves 3 laptops around the house.
    >
    > What are you using for DHCP? If using static IPs, what are you using
    > for NAT ... assuming you are sharing the xDSL connection among all of the
    > computers? Regarding the WAP54G specifically, it does not perform any of
    > those functions above. Also, in order to connect to its web configuration
    > page, you'll need to be in the same IP range and subnet. It is generally
    > recommended to do all configuration of wireless components with a wired
    > connection (i.e.. computer connected to router, WAP54G connected to same
    > router).
    >
    >
  3. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    "d.p." <no@spam.never> wrote in message
    news:411791d1$0$7122$db0fefd9@news.zen.co.uk...
    > the ADSL modem is the DHCP server. It is connected to the 5th "in" port on
    > the switch. All the other components are connected via that switch as well
    > using the normal ports These components are the linksys access point and
    two
    > wired computers. The laptops use wireless, and also get their IP's from
    the
    > modem. The access point is just a "pass-through" in a sense. NAT is used
    and
    > the IP range that's used is the standard 192.168.1.x.
    > I connect to the wireless access point using a wired computer, via the
    > switch.
    > Everything has been working great in the past. It just recently started
    > acting like this.
    >
    >
    >
    > "mhicaoidh" <®êmõvé_mhic_aoidh@hotÑîXmailSPäM.com> wrote in message
    > news:H4MRc.274322$Oq2.58050@attbi_s52...
    > > Taking a moment's reflection, d.p. mused:
    > > |
    > > | Hello
    > > | This is my setup:
    > > | ADSL modem connected to a 4-port switch, then the linksys WAP54G (with
    > > | newest firmware) connects to that, and also 2 other computers. The
    > WAP54G
    > > | serves 3 laptops around the house.
    > >
    > > What are you using for DHCP? If using static IPs, what are you
    using
    > > for NAT ... assuming you are sharing the xDSL connection among all of
    the
    > > computers? Regarding the WAP54G specifically, it does not perform any
    of
    > > those functions above. Also, in order to connect to its web
    configuration
    > > page, you'll need to be in the same IP range and subnet. It is
    generally
    > > recommended to do all configuration of wireless components with a wired
    > > connection (i.e.. computer connected to router, WAP54G connected to same
    > > router).

    Is there really no router in this picture, or is what you called a 4-port
    switch actually a router? How about a make and model?

    What you are trying to do is to connect your home network with the cable
    provider's network. The device that connects two or more networks is a
    router. I'm having trouble understanding how this ever worked if you don't
    have a router.

    Ron Bandes, CCNP, CTT+, etc.
  4. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    "Ron Bandes" <RunderscoreBandes @yah00.com> wrote in message
    news:jGMRc.47804$zc4.19312778@news4.srv.hcvlny.cv.net...
    > "d.p." <no@spam.never> wrote in message
    > news:411791d1$0$7122$db0fefd9@news.zen.co.uk...
    > > the ADSL modem is the DHCP server. It is connected to the 5th "in" port
    on
    > > the switch. All the other components are connected via that switch as
    well
    > > using the normal ports These components are the linksys access point and
    > two
    > > wired computers. The laptops use wireless, and also get their IP's from
    > the
    > > modem. The access point is just a "pass-through" in a sense. NAT is used
    > and
    > > the IP range that's used is the standard 192.168.1.x.
    > > I connect to the wireless access point using a wired computer, via the
    > > switch.
    > > Everything has been working great in the past. It just recently started
    > > acting like this.
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > "mhicaoidh" <®êmõvé_mhic_aoidh@hotÑîXmailSPäM.com> wrote in message
    > > news:H4MRc.274322$Oq2.58050@attbi_s52...
    > > > Taking a moment's reflection, d.p. mused:
    > > > |
    > > > | Hello
    > > > | This is my setup:
    > > > | ADSL modem connected to a 4-port switch, then the linksys WAP54G
    (with
    > > > | newest firmware) connects to that, and also 2 other computers. The
    > > WAP54G
    > > > | serves 3 laptops around the house.
    > > >
    > > > What are you using for DHCP? If using static IPs, what are you
    > using
    > > > for NAT ... assuming you are sharing the xDSL connection among all of
    > the
    > > > computers? Regarding the WAP54G specifically, it does not perform any
    > of
    > > > those functions above. Also, in order to connect to its web
    > configuration
    > > > page, you'll need to be in the same IP range and subnet. It is
    > generally
    > > > recommended to do all configuration of wireless components with a
    wired
    > > > connection (i.e.. computer connected to router, WAP54G connected to
    same
    > > > router).
    >
    > Is there really no router in this picture, or is what you called a 4-port
    > switch actually a router? How about a make and model?
    >
    > What you are trying to do is to connect your home network with the cable
    > provider's network. The device that connects two or more networks is a
    > router. I'm having trouble understanding how this ever worked if you
    don't
    > have a router.
    >
    > Ron Bandes, CCNP, CTT+, etc.
    >
    >
    The WAP54G can act as a router.
    AG
  5. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    "AG" <atenor@email.com> wrote in message
    news:4117a0b3$0$44243$4c5eba9e@news.getnet.net...
    > The WAP54G can act as a router.
    > AG

    Nothing that I see in the product documentation leads me to believe that
    this is true.

    Ron Bandes, CCNP, CTT+, etc.
  6. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Taking a moment's reflection, AG mused:
    |
    | The WAP54G can act as a router.

    The WAP54G can only act as an Access Point, AP Client, Wireless
    Repeater, or Wireless Bridge. It cannot act as a router.
  7. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    "mhicaoidh" <®êmõvé_mhic_aoidh@hotÑîXmailŠPäM.com> wrote in message
    news:0sRRc.257522$JR4.122025@attbi_s54...
    > Taking a moment's reflection, AG mused:
    > |
    > | The WAP54G can act as a router.
    >
    > The WAP54G can only act as an Access Point, AP Client, Wireless
    > Repeater, or Wireless Bridge. It cannot act as a router.
    >
    >
    Sorry. I was thinking of a different device. Too many W**54s running
    around in my head.
    AG
  8. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    The modem/router is the SMC ADSL Barricade Router (SMC7401BRA), which get's
    an IP address assigned to it. It in turn acts as the DHCP server, providing
    all the NAT config, etc. There's a 4-port switch (5 ports, but the 5th
    connects to the router), which is the 3com OfficeConnect Switch 5. Two wired
    computers connect to it, and one wireless access point (the Linksys WAP54G).
    I really think the problem lies with the Linksys AP, because the wired
    computers are fine. The wireless devices find the AP, but that's where it
    stops. They can't get to the router to get an IP address, and then get
    internet access.
    The AP itself doesn't use DHCP, but it has a fixed IP, that it gets by
    default - 192.168.1.245 (it can be changed, but I haven't done that).

    But the most puzzling thing is that it acts as if the connection exists (the
    Link./Act light is on on the AP, and the link light on the switch is on),
    and when I ping any local address (including its own .245) the Link/Act
    light on the AP blinks, but the ping times out. Is it possible that it
    somehow got its IP address changed to one that can't be accessed? If that's
    the reason, then is there a program that scans the whole local network and
    tells me the IP addresses of all the devices?

    On the other hand, I doubt that scanning the network for all devices would
    help, since even the Linksys Connection Wizard couldn't find it, and it
    doesn't use the web interface, but a standalone program.

    I also tried resetting it, but I'm not sure if it resets to factory defaults
    or just restarts it.

    I hope everything is clear now.

    thanks for the help!


    "Ron Bandes" <RunderscoreBandes @yah00.com> wrote in message
    news:%TNRc.48019$zc4.19511444@news4.srv.hcvlny.cv.net...
    > "AG" <atenor@email.com> wrote in message
    > news:4117a0b3$0$44243$4c5eba9e@news.getnet.net...
    > > The WAP54G can act as a router.
    > > AG
    >
    > Nothing that I see in the product documentation leads me to believe that
    > this is true.
    >
    > Ron Bandes, CCNP, CTT+, etc.
    >
    >
  9. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Taking a moment's reflection, d.p. mused:
    |
    | The AP itself doesn't use DHCP, but it has a fixed IP, that it gets by
    | default - 192.168.1.245 (it can be changed, but I haven't done that).

    You either need to have the AP have a fixed IP within the IP range and
    subnet of the modem/router, or you need to have the router assign same to
    AP. If it is in a different IP range (i.e. your router is assigning
    192.168.100.x, and the AP is 192.168.1.245) then this will disrupt
    communication.

    Additionally, do you have WEP/WPA enabled? Are you broadcasting your
    SSID? Are you filtering MAC Addresses? Generally, it is best to start with
    encryption off, SSID on (no need to turn it off once you enable encryption
    anyway), and no MAC filtering. Once you confirm connectivity, then start
    securing things.
  10. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    ok, everyone, I have no idea what just happened, but one of the laptops
    connected, so I checked via the web interface, and everything is back to
    normal - ie the Linksys AP has 192.168.1.245 as its IP. I'm really confused
    why all this happened. It's as if the AP didn't want to broadcast its IP to
    the network, and concequently couldn't communicate with anyone. I just hope
    this doesn't happen again!

    as to the security....I do SSID, with no encryption, although I did do
    encryption, but it was causing a few problems, including when guests come
    and want to connect. I'll set it up again though, cause I would ideally want
    some sort of security.

    Thanks to all for the help! much appretiated!


    "mhicaoidh" <®êmõvé_mhic_aoidh@hotÑîXmailSPäM.com> wrote in message
    news:fwRRc.275491$Oq2.127024@attbi_s52...
    > Taking a moment's reflection, d.p. mused:
    > |
    > | The AP itself doesn't use DHCP, but it has a fixed IP, that it gets by
    > | default - 192.168.1.245 (it can be changed, but I haven't done that).
    >
    > You either need to have the AP have a fixed IP within the IP range and
    > subnet of the modem/router, or you need to have the router assign same to
    > AP. If it is in a different IP range (i.e. your router is assigning
    > 192.168.100.x, and the AP is 192.168.1.245) then this will disrupt
    > communication.
    >
    > Additionally, do you have WEP/WPA enabled? Are you broadcasting your
    > SSID? Are you filtering MAC Addresses? Generally, it is best to start
    with
    > encryption off, SSID on (no need to turn it off once you enable encryption
    > anyway), and no MAC filtering. Once you confirm connectivity, then start
    > securing things.
    >
    >
  11. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Hi,
    I agree with the IP story of the previous poster.
    I didn't manage to ping the WAP54G with the default IP address
    192.168.1.245.
    Changed the address to 192.168.0.101 => everything o.k.

    By the way, a firewall can cause problems as well. Make your to trust the IP
    address of the AP.
    Normally the address range 192.168.0.0 - 0.255 is trusted, the address
    192.168.1.x is outside this range (my experience with Norton Internet
    Security).
    Change the firewall settings or change the IP address. I went for a change
    of the default IP address.

    /rob

    "mhicaoidh" <®êmõvé_mhic_aoidh@hotÑîXmailSPäM.com> wrote in message
    news:fwRRc.275491$Oq2.127024@attbi_s52...
    > Taking a moment's reflection, d.p. mused:
    > |
    > | The AP itself doesn't use DHCP, but it has a fixed IP, that it gets by
    > | default - 192.168.1.245 (it can be changed, but I haven't done that).
    >
    > You either need to have the AP have a fixed IP within the IP range and
    > subnet of the modem/router, or you need to have the router assign same to
    > AP. If it is in a different IP range (i.e. your router is assigning
    > 192.168.100.x, and the AP is 192.168.1.245) then this will disrupt
    > communication.
    >
    > Additionally, do you have WEP/WPA enabled? Are you broadcasting your
    > SSID? Are you filtering MAC Addresses? Generally, it is best to start
    with
    > encryption off, SSID on (no need to turn it off once you enable encryption
    > anyway), and no MAC filtering. Once you confirm connectivity, then start
    > securing things.
    >
    >
  12. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    I think the problem was worse than it just not having the default IP. The
    Linksys Connection Wizard itself couldn't find it, and I believe it doesn't
    depend on IP address, but rather on some propriatory system. But this is
    just me and my philosophy.

    I don't use a firewall because I use NAT, which has served me great.
    Basically does the same thing. The hassle with that is that you need to
    route ports, which can be a pain, especially since my router allows only up
    to 20 ports and you can't specify ranges...very frustrating!


    "Robban" <robbansoft@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:aY2dnYGUDr4NdIrcRVnygA@casema.nl...
    > Hi,
    > I agree with the IP story of the previous poster.
    > I didn't manage to ping the WAP54G with the default IP address
    > 192.168.1.245.
    > Changed the address to 192.168.0.101 => everything o.k.
    >
    > By the way, a firewall can cause problems as well. Make your to trust the
    IP
    > address of the AP.
    > Normally the address range 192.168.0.0 - 0.255 is trusted, the address
    > 192.168.1.x is outside this range (my experience with Norton Internet
    > Security).
    > Change the firewall settings or change the IP address. I went for a change
    > of the default IP address.
    >
    > /rob
    >
    > "mhicaoidh" <®êmõvé_mhic_aoidh@hotÑîXmailSPäM.com> wrote in message
    > news:fwRRc.275491$Oq2.127024@attbi_s52...
    > > Taking a moment's reflection, d.p. mused:
    > > |
    > > | The AP itself doesn't use DHCP, but it has a fixed IP, that it gets by
    > > | default - 192.168.1.245 (it can be changed, but I haven't done that).
    > >
    > > You either need to have the AP have a fixed IP within the IP range
    and
    > > subnet of the modem/router, or you need to have the router assign same
    to
    > > AP. If it is in a different IP range (i.e. your router is assigning
    > > 192.168.100.x, and the AP is 192.168.1.245) then this will disrupt
    > > communication.
    > >
    > > Additionally, do you have WEP/WPA enabled? Are you broadcasting
    your
    > > SSID? Are you filtering MAC Addresses? Generally, it is best to start
    > with
    > > encryption off, SSID on (no need to turn it off once you enable
    encryption
    > > anyway), and no MAC filtering. Once you confirm connectivity, then
    start
    > > securing things.
    > >
    > >
    >
    >
  13. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    "d.p." <no@spam.never> wrote in message
    news:4117eaac$0$7126$db0fefd9@news.zen.co.uk...
    > ok, everyone, I have no idea what just happened, but one of the laptops
    > connected, so I checked via the web interface, and everything is back to
    > normal - ie the Linksys AP has 192.168.1.245 as its IP. I'm really
    confused
    > why all this happened. It's as if the AP didn't want to broadcast its IP
    to
    > the network, and concequently couldn't communicate with anyone. I just
    hope
    > this doesn't happen again!

    You didn't tell us what IP subnet the SMC's LAN is using. What are the
    addresses of the wired computers?

    Ron Bandes, CCNP, CTT+, etc.
  14. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    "d.p." <no@spam.never> wrote in message
    news:4117e138$0$7123$db0fefd9@news.zen.co.uk...
    > The modem/router is the SMC ADSL Barricade Router (SMC7401BRA)

    I can't find this model on SMC's web-site.

    Ron Bandes, CCNP, CTT+, etc.
  15. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    "d.p." <no@spam.never> wrote in message
    news:4117ec24$0$7129$db0fefd9@news.zen.co.uk...
    > I don't use a firewall because I use NAT, which has served me great.
    > Basically does the same thing.

    NAT is not a real firewall feature, despite Netgear's claim of a double
    firewall: SPI and NAT. The main reason to run a personal firewall on your
    computer, instead of depending upon a separate device, is to protect you
    against spyware on your computer making outbound connections. NAT won't
    help at all with that. Also, on a Wireless LAN, the router will not protect
    you against other devices on the LAN.

    Ron Bandes, CCNP, CTT+, etc.
  16. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    if you go here: http://www.smc-europe.com/english/
    and then go to the support section and then "Drivers & more -> Broadband",
    you'll find it there, with its documentation and other info. It's not listed
    in the products section anymore, probably because v2 has come out now.

    but anyway, the problem has been fixed now, so all is good. I don't know how
    it happened, but it just did. I think it was just the linksys AP that was
    acting up.


    "Ron Bandes" <RunderscoreBandes @yah00.com> wrote in message
    news:80%Rc.51783$zc4.21860234@news4.srv.hcvlny.cv.net...
    > "d.p." <no@spam.never> wrote in message
    > news:4117e138$0$7123$db0fefd9@news.zen.co.uk...
    > > The modem/router is the SMC ADSL Barricade Router (SMC7401BRA)
    >
    > I can't find this model on SMC's web-site.
    >
    > Ron Bandes, CCNP, CTT+, etc.
    >
    >
  17. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    I'm actually running "PestPatrol" to prevent spyware and other such things
    from being run in the first place, and I also do manual scans once in a
    while with Spybot Search and Destroy, and also Spyware Blaster.
    I've also got a very nice hosts file that is being worked on every day (by
    someone on the internet - www.boredmofo.com), to improve efficiency and
    fucionality, and if I do run into problems that the hosts file is
    responsible for, I use HostsToggle, to temporarily disable it:
    http://accs-net.com/hosts/HostsToggle/ Works great!


    "Ron Bandes" <RunderscoreBandes @yah00.com> wrote in message
    news:a7%Rc.51884$zc4.21876524@news4.srv.hcvlny.cv.net...
    > "d.p." <no@spam.never> wrote in message
    > news:4117ec24$0$7129$db0fefd9@news.zen.co.uk...
    > > I don't use a firewall because I use NAT, which has served me great.
    > > Basically does the same thing.
    >
    > NAT is not a real firewall feature, despite Netgear's claim of a double
    > firewall: SPI and NAT. The main reason to run a personal firewall on your
    > computer, instead of depending upon a separate device, is to protect you
    > against spyware on your computer making outbound connections. NAT won't
    > help at all with that. Also, on a Wireless LAN, the router will not
    protect
    > you against other devices on the LAN.
    >
    > Ron Bandes, CCNP, CTT+, etc.
    >
    >
  18. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    I believe it was mentioned earlier, but anyway, it's 192.168.1.x
    Actually, the router has the DHCP range set from 192.168.1.2-33
    The linksys has its .245 as static

    Would that actually matter? It hasn't before, and it's working now (don't
    know how or why).


    "Ron Bandes" <RunderscoreBandes @yah00.com> wrote in message
    news:OV_Rc.51680$zc4.21844823@news4.srv.hcvlny.cv.net...
    > "d.p." <no@spam.never> wrote in message
    > news:4117eaac$0$7126$db0fefd9@news.zen.co.uk...
    > > ok, everyone, I have no idea what just happened, but one of the laptops
    > > connected, so I checked via the web interface, and everything is back to
    > > normal - ie the Linksys AP has 192.168.1.245 as its IP. I'm really
    > confused
    > > why all this happened. It's as if the AP didn't want to broadcast its IP
    > to
    > > the network, and concequently couldn't communicate with anyone. I just
    > hope
    > > this doesn't happen again!
    >
    > You didn't tell us what IP subnet the SMC's LAN is using. What are the
    > addresses of the wired computers?
    >
    > Ron Bandes, CCNP, CTT+, etc.
    >
    >
  19. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Taking a moment's reflection, AG mused:
    |
    | Sorry. I was thinking of a different device. Too many W**54s running
    | around in my head.

    I hear you! ;-)
  20. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    On Mon, 9 Aug 2004 11:05:17 -0500, "AG" <atenor@email.com> wrote:

    <snip>

    >The WAP54G can act as a router.
    >AG
    >

    I have a WAP54G. I dunno where you are getting your information, but it most
    certainly will not function as a router.
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