Setting Up Wireless Access In A Cafe while protecting my n..

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

Hello,

I have a small cafe with an office in the back. We have a linksys
wireless router. Currently, all of the computers in the office and
cafe are accessing the internet and each other through the router -
small network.

I would like to offer free wireless service in the cafe to my
customers through my existing service. The problem is that I don't
want them to be able to access my network. Is there an easy way to
setup a second access point that taps into the primary router, but
only allows the connection to get to the internet?

Thank you very much
Mal
7 answers Last reply
More about setting wireless access cafe protecting
  1. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    On 10 Aug 2004 13:11:13 -0700, malnsf@msn.com (MalNSF) wrote:

    >I have a small cafe with an office in the back. We have a linksys
    >wireless router. Currently, all of the computers in the office and
    >cafe are accessing the internet and each other through the router -
    >small network.
    >
    >I would like to offer free wireless service in the cafe to my
    >customers through my existing service. The problem is that I don't
    >want them to be able to access my network. Is there an easy way to
    >setup a second access point that taps into the primary router, but
    >only allows the connection to get to the internet?

    I posted some methods in the distant past. See:
    http://www.google.com/groups?selm=ok6rd05dskhorur3v4hndmpsfn36mt7v2o%404ax.com
    http://www.google.com/groups?selm=sgpje09lbt48l29edp63mdeskakhtm0u2t%404ax.com

    Not a 2nd "access point" but perhaps a 2nd "wireless router". The
    easiest and most expensive way is to arrange for a 2nd IP address
    from your ISP. Both IP's go through the DSL or cable modem, which
    then goes to a cheapo 4 port ethernet switch. From there, they go to
    your two routers. Neither LAN on each router can see the other.

    If two IP's are deemed excessive, then put the two routers in series.
    Something like:


    /----\ /----\
    == DSL ====| |======================| |====
    Modem | |=== 192.168.0.xxx | |==== 10.0.0.xxx
    | |=== | |====
    | |=== Office LAN | |==== Coffee Shop
    | | | | Network
    \----/ \----/
    Router #1 Router #2
    Wireless 192.168.0.xxx Wireless 10.0.0.xxx
    for office LAN for coffee shop

    I'm not really sure which network should be the coffee shop and which
    the office LAN. Probably the way I drew it because it's fairly easy
    to monitor and sniff the coffee shop network at the office LAN router.

    --
    # Jeff Liebermann 150 Felker St #D Santa Cruz CA 95060
    # 831.336.2558 voice http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
    # jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
    # 831.421.6491 digital_pager jeffl@cruzio.com AE6KS
  2. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Like as been said before get a second wireless router, B wireless routers
    are cheap, get a cross over cable plug the new router in to the old. Give
    the new router a different SSID and channel number and different IP number
    and enable auto DHCP, no WEP or WPA. On your existing router enable MAC
    filtering. and WEP or WPA.


    "Jeff Liebermann" <jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us> wrote in message
    news:ofhih0p14cuikrcb9h6ho9ke6ofpu480oo@4ax.com...
    > On 10 Aug 2004 13:11:13 -0700, malnsf@msn.com (MalNSF) wrote:
    >
    > >I have a small cafe with an office in the back. We have a linksys
    > >wireless router. Currently, all of the computers in the office and
    > >cafe are accessing the internet and each other through the router -
    > >small network.
    > >
    > >I would like to offer free wireless service in the cafe to my
    > >customers through my existing service. The problem is that I don't
    > >want them to be able to access my network. Is there an easy way to
    > >setup a second access point that taps into the primary router, but
    > >only allows the connection to get to the internet?
    >
    > I posted some methods in the distant past. See:
    >
    http://www.google.com/groups?selm=ok6rd05dskhorur3v4hndmpsfn36mt7v2o%404ax.com
    >
    http://www.google.com/groups?selm=sgpje09lbt48l29edp63mdeskakhtm0u2t%404ax.com
    >
    > Not a 2nd "access point" but perhaps a 2nd "wireless router". The
    > easiest and most expensive way is to arrange for a 2nd IP address
    > from your ISP. Both IP's go through the DSL or cable modem, which
    > then goes to a cheapo 4 port ethernet switch. From there, they go to
    > your two routers. Neither LAN on each router can see the other.
    >
    > If two IP's are deemed excessive, then put the two routers in series.
    > Something like:
    >
    >
    > /----\ /----\
    > == DSL ====| |======================| |====
    > Modem | |=== 192.168.0.xxx | |==== 10.0.0.xxx
    > | |=== | |====
    > | |=== Office LAN | |==== Coffee Shop
    > | | | | Network
    > \----/ \----/
    > Router #1 Router #2
    > Wireless 192.168.0.xxx Wireless 10.0.0.xxx
    > for office LAN for coffee shop
    >
    > I'm not really sure which network should be the coffee shop and which
    > the office LAN. Probably the way I drew it because it's fairly easy
    > to monitor and sniff the coffee shop network at the office LAN router.
    >
    > --
    > # Jeff Liebermann 150 Felker St #D Santa Cruz CA 95060
    > # 831.336.2558 voice http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
    > # jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
    > # 831.421.6491 digital_pager jeffl@cruzio.com AE6KS
  3. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Jeff Liebermann <jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us> wrote:

    > /----\ /----\
    > == DSL ====| |======================| |====
    > Modem | |=== 192.168.0.xxx | |==== 10.0.0.xxx
    > | |=== | |====
    > | |=== Office LAN | |==== Coffee Shop
    > | | | | Network
    > \----/ \----/
    > Router #1 Router #2
    > Wireless 192.168.0.xxx Wireless 10.0.0.xxx
    > for office LAN for coffee shop

    > I'm not really sure which network should be the coffee shop and which
    > the office LAN. Probably the way I drew it because it's fairly easy
    > to monitor and sniff the coffee shop network at the office LAN router.

    I would rather have the Coffee Shop be the first router.
    That would have the Office router connected to the Coffee shop, but
    protected by NAT from the coffee shop. Wired your way, isn't the office
    traffic on the "public" side of the coffee shop router, and easily
    accessible?

    --
    ---
    Clarence A Dold - Hidden Valley (Lake County) CA USA 38.8-122.5
  4. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    On Tue, 10 Aug 2004 22:43:18 +0000 (UTC),
    dold@SettingXUp.usenet.us.com wrote:

    >Jeff Liebermann <jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us> wrote:
    >
    >> /----\ /----\
    >> == DSL ====| |======================| |====
    >> Modem | |=== 192.168.0.xxx | |==== 10.0.0.xxx
    >> | |=== | |====
    >> | |=== Office LAN | |==== Coffee Shop
    >> | | | | Network
    >> \----/ \----/
    >> Router #1 Router #2
    >> Wireless 192.168.0.xxx Wireless 10.0.0.xxx
    >> for office LAN for coffee shop
    >
    >> I'm not really sure which network should be the coffee shop and which
    >> the office LAN. Probably the way I drew it because it's fairly easy
    >> to monitor and sniff the coffee shop network at the office LAN router.

    >I would rather have the Coffee Shop be the first router.
    >That would have the Office router connected to the Coffee shop, but
    >protected by NAT from the coffee shop. Wired your way, isn't the office
    >traffic on the "public" side of the coffee shop router, and easily
    >accessible?

    I dunno. I don't think the 192.168.0.xxx network is accessible from
    the coffee shop because the default route will send literally every
    packet to the office LAN router at 192.168.0.1. If I specify one of
    the other machines by IP address (from the coffee shop side), it will
    still go to the router. However, I've been in the sun for 5 hours
    working on my truck and my brain is not running at peak efficiency.

    Here's a web page with exactly the same arrangement. If they sayeth
    it worketh, then far be it for me to disagree.
    http://www.publicip.net/index_sub.php?show=gateway&from=hotspots
    (When it doubt, hide behind authority and whatever Google can find).

    What kinda goo is good for plugging a hole in the side of a car
    battery?

    --
    # Jeff Liebermann 150 Felker St #D Santa Cruz CA 95060
    # 831.336.2558 voice http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
    # jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
    # 831.421.6491 digital_pager jeffl@cruzio.com AE6KS
  5. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Jeff Liebermann <jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us> wrote:
    > I dunno. I don't think the 192.168.0.xxx network is accessible from
    > the coffee shop because the default route will send literally every
    > packet to the office LAN router at 192.168.0.1. If I specify one of
    > the other machines by IP address (from the coffee shop side), it will
    > still go to the router. However, I've been in the sun for 5 hours
    > working on my truck and my brain is not running at peak efficiency.

    It would go into the router, but right back out to the appropriate IP,
    methinks.

    > Here's a web page with exactly the same arrangement. If they sayeth
    > it worketh, then far be it for me to disagree.
    > http://www.publicip.net/index_sub.php?show=gateway&from=hotspots
    > (When it doubt, hide behind authority and whatever Google can find).

    There-ya-go. Winner. Oops, there's a caveat in bold:
    "The ZoneCD can be configured to block all network traffic to your *wired*
    network. "

    Of course, that's also a good reference page for the Original Poster.


    > What kinda goo is good for plugging a hole in the side of a car
    > battery?

    JBWeld works on gel cell batteries and gas tanks ;-)


    --
    ---
    Clarence A Dold - Hidden Valley (Lake County) CA USA 38.8-122.5
  6. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    On Wed, 11 Aug 2004 00:09:04 +0000 (UTC),
    dold@SettingXUp.usenet.us.com wrote:

    >> Here's a web page with exactly the same arrangement. If they sayeth
    >> it worketh, then far be it for me to disagree.
    >> http://www.publicip.net/index_sub.php?show=gateway&from=hotspots
    >> (When it doubt, hide behind authority and whatever Google can find).

    >There-ya-go. Winner. Oops, there's a caveat in bold:
    >"The ZoneCD can be configured to block all network traffic to your *wired*
    >network. "

    Well, there's always my favorite way. I use Freesco router
    http://www.freesco.org
    http://freesco.sourceforge.net/
    http://www.freescosoft.com
    with multiple ethernet cards on the LAN side. Each ethernet port goes
    to an access point or router wired as an access point. Router is
    centrally located with firewall rules using IPChains. I use old P133
    machines and an ugly mix of ethernet cards.

    >Of course, that's also a good reference page for the Original Poster.

    Yep. I downloaded the PublicIP hot spot software, went through their
    signup ordeal process, and then forgot about trying the software.
    Oops.

    >> What kinda goo is good for plugging a hole in the side of a car
    >> battery?
    >JBWeld works on gel cell batteries and gas tanks ;-)

    I used ordinary epoxy. That worked well enough. Now to clean up the
    mess it made of the battery shelf...


    --
    Jeff Liebermann jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
    150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
    Santa Cruz CA 95060 AE6KS 831-336-2558
  7. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    "Christian" <nomail.please@no.com> wrote in message news:<hqcSc.5668$oA5.2152@okepread05>...
    > Like as been said before get a second wireless router, B wireless routers
    > are cheap, get a cross over cable plug the new router in to the old. Give
    > the new router a different SSID and channel number and different IP number
    > and enable auto DHCP, no WEP or WPA. On your existing router enable MAC
    > filtering. and WEP or WPA.
    >
    >
    > "Jeff Liebermann" <jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us> wrote in message
    > news:ofhih0p14cuikrcb9h6ho9ke6ofpu480oo@4ax.com...
    > > On 10 Aug 2004 13:11:13 -0700, malnsf@msn.com (MalNSF) wrote:
    > >
    > > >I have a small cafe with an office in the back. We have a linksys
    > > >wireless router. Currently, all of the computers in the office and
    > > >cafe are accessing the internet and each other through the router -
    > > >small network.
    > > >
    > > >I would like to offer free wireless service in the cafe to my
    > > >customers through my existing service. The problem is that I don't
    > > >want them to be able to access my network. Is there an easy way to
    > > >setup a second access point that taps into the primary router, but
    > > >only allows the connection to get to the internet?
    > >
    > > I posted some methods in the distant past. See:
    > >
    > http://www.google.com/groups?selm=ok6rd05dskhorur3v4hndmpsfn36mt7v2o%404ax.com
    > >
    > http://www.google.com/groups?selm=sgpje09lbt48l29edp63mdeskakhtm0u2t%404ax.com
    > >
    > > Not a 2nd "access point" but perhaps a 2nd "wireless router". The
    > > easiest and most expensive way is to arrange for a 2nd IP address
    > > from your ISP. Both IP's go through the DSL or cable modem, which
    > > then goes to a cheapo 4 port ethernet switch. From there, they go to
    > > your two routers. Neither LAN on each router can see the other.
    > >
    > > If two IP's are deemed excessive, then put the two routers in series.
    > > Something like:
    > >
    > >
    > > /----\ /----\
    > > == DSL ====| |======================| |====
    > > Modem | |=== 192.168.0.xxx | |==== 10.0.0.xxx
    > > | |=== | |====
    > > | |=== Office LAN | |==== Coffee Shop
    > > | | | | Network
    > > \----/ \----/
    > > Router #1 Router #2
    > > Wireless 192.168.0.xxx Wireless 10.0.0.xxx
    > > for office LAN for coffee shop
    > >
    > > I'm not really sure which network should be the coffee shop and which
    > > the office LAN. Probably the way I drew it because it's fairly easy
    > > to monitor and sniff the coffee shop network at the office LAN router.
    > >
    > > --
    > > # Jeff Liebermann 150 Felker St #D Santa Cruz CA 95060
    > > # 831.336.2558 voice http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
    > > # jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
    > > # 831.421.6491 digital_pager jeffl@cruzio.com AE6KS

    Thank you very much for the help. I really appreciate your time and
    effort. I will be in the cafe next week and will give it a try.
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