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Mouse - Cordless Wireless Corded

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  • Wireless
  • Mice
  • Wireless Mouse
  • Windows XP
Last response: in Windows XP
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Anonymous
a b F Wireless
September 23, 2004 4:18:50 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

I'm confused, to say the least. I have a corded mouse. What is the
difference between a Cordless mouse and a Wireless mouse? What is this
optical mouse business. Not into games but would like to eliminate the
corded mouse. Can someone explain above and suggest a model number for a
cordless(?) wireless(?) mouse?
TIA
Dannie

More about : mouse cordless wireless corded

Anonymous
a b F Wireless
September 23, 2004 4:18:51 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

Dannie wrote:
> I'm confused, to say the least. I have a corded mouse. What is the
> difference between a Cordless mouse and a Wireless mouse? What is this
> optical mouse business. Not into games but would like to eliminate the
> corded mouse. Can someone explain above and suggest a model number
> for a cordless(?) wireless(?) mouse?

Difference between a mouse with a cord and a cordless mouse?
One has a cord, one communicates via infrared or radio frequency with a base
unit. To your computer, there is no difference unless the mouse has special
functions (even if it did, there would be no difference in the driver
between the corded and cordless version of the mouse.)

Optical mouse means it has no mouseball. It detect movements with light
instead of a ball rolling around on a table/mousepad. Much better response
time and less cleaning.

Recommended wireless optical mouse?

Logitech.. Any of them.
MX1000 is the "big guy" right now.

--
<- Shenan ->
--
The information is provided "as is", it is suggested you research for
yourself before you take any advice - you are the one ultimately
responsible for your actions/problems/solutions. Know what you are
getting into before you jump in with both feet.
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
September 23, 2004 4:18:51 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

A corded mouse might eirther have a ball or a red infirred light ( that
is opical) and a wireless mouse has a recever but the mouse will take
battrires if you are thing about geting a wireless mouse get a microsoft
one the new ones are really nice i have one that is called grovey it has
orange and red clolors on it

"Dannie" wrote:

> I'm confused, to say the least. I have a corded mouse. What is the
> difference between a Cordless mouse and a Wireless mouse? What is this
> optical mouse business. Not into games but would like to eliminate the
> corded mouse. Can someone explain above and suggest a model number for a
> cordless(?) wireless(?) mouse?
> TIA
> Dannie
>
>
>
>
Related resources
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
September 23, 2004 4:18:52 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

If you do go for a cordless mouse, I would suggest
getting a cordless keyboard and mouse together. Each of
them individually will go for anywhere from 30-50$, while
a set is around 70$.
If you can, get a cordless mouse that is rechargeable
instead of one that runs on batteries. We have a battery
operated one and it eats batteries like crazy!
>-----Original Message-----
>Dannie wrote:
>> I'm confused, to say the least. I have a corded mouse.
What is the
>> difference between a Cordless mouse and a Wireless
mouse? What is this
>> optical mouse business. Not into games but would like
to eliminate the
>> corded mouse. Can someone explain above and suggest a
model number
>> for a cordless(?) wireless(?) mouse?
>
>Difference between a mouse with a cord and a cordless
mouse?
>One has a cord, one communicates via infrared or radio
frequency with a base
>unit. To your computer, there is no difference unless
the mouse has special
>functions (even if it did, there would be no difference
in the driver
>between the corded and cordless version of the mouse.)
>
>Optical mouse means it has no mouseball. It detect
movements with light
>instead of a ball rolling around on a table/mousepad.
Much better response
>time and less cleaning.
>
>Recommended wireless optical mouse?
>
>Logitech.. Any of them.
>MX1000 is the "big guy" right now.
>
>--
><- Shenan ->
>--
>The information is provided "as is", it is suggested you
research for
>yourself before you take any advice - you are the one
ultimately
>responsible for your actions/problems/solutions. Know
what you are
>getting into before you jump in with both feet.
>
>
>.
>
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
September 23, 2004 4:18:53 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

"anonymous@discussions.microsoft.com"
<anonymous@discussions.microsoft.com>
wrote in news:425d01c4a10a$75932920$a501280a@phx.gbl:
> If you do go for a cordless mouse, I would suggest
> getting a cordless keyboard and mouse together. Each of
> them individually will go for anywhere from 30-50$, while
> a set is around 70$.
> If you can, get a cordless mouse that is rechargeable
> instead of one that runs on batteries. We have a battery
> operated one and it eats batteries like crazy!

And why you should buy rechargeable batteries and a charger. Get 2 sets
of rechargeable batteries: when the set in the mouse gets low or dead
then swap them for the already charged ones, and then charge the
depleted set. The smaller the batteries the less charge they contain
and the faster they will deplete.

Regardless of the claims by cordless mouse makers that batteries should
last for more than month and maybe up to 40 days, it ain't true. They
must measure that based on only a couple hours use per day. I use my
mouse all day and all evening (okay, it's not constant but my computer
use spans most of the day along with the mouse use). Alkaline batteries
last me about 17 to 22 days while rechargeable NiMH batteries last 14 to
17 days.

Unless you need a cordless keyboard, don't bother. You might realize
the cordless mouse's batteries are going dead because the cursor moves
erratically or not at all, but often users start losing keystrokes or
pound harder on the keys when the cordless keyboard's batteries get low
or die. Not all cordless products provide a popup warning to replace
the batteries, and they be unseen if under an always-on-top window.

A cordless mouse will weigh more than a corded mouse. That's because of
the weight from the batteries. If you use your computer for hours upon
hours with lots of mouse use, your pinky will get fatigued having to
squeeze the mouse when repeatedly having to lift and move it over (and
why sometimes trackballs are preferred). But with a cordless mouse you
don't have the resistance of the moving its cord around with the mouse
or having it slap into stuff and create torque from resistance to
bending.

--
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_________________________________________________________________
September 24, 2004 1:59:04 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

> Regardless of the claims by cordless mouse makers that batteries should
> last for more than month and maybe up to 40 days, it ain't true. They
> must measure that based on only a couple hours use per day. I use my
> mouse all day and all evening (okay, it's not constant but my computer use
> spans most of the day along with the mouse use). Alkaline batteries last
> me about 17 to 22 days while rechargeable NiMH batteries last 14 to 17
> days.

I don't know what mouse you are using but my Microsoft cordless, optical,
wheel mouse gets about 6 months of use per set of AA's and I am on the
computer a lot. My old Microsoft cordless wheel mouse got 3 months use with
every set of AA's that I installed. If you only get 40 days, there is
something wrong with your mouse.
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
September 24, 2004 11:01:45 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

"Ron" <spam@kwic.com>
wrote in news:eCYbo6joEHA.896@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl:
>
> I don't know what mouse you are using but my Microsoft cordless,
> optical, wheel mouse gets about 6 months of use per set of AA's and
> I am on the computer a lot. My old Microsoft cordless wheel mouse got
> 3 months use with every set of AA's that I installed. If you only get
> 40 days, there is something wrong with your mouse.

Depends on your use. If you game a lot then the mouse is in constant
motion and never gets to sleep (or it shouldn't be allowed to sleep;
otherwise, you'll be stuck in the game until it get awakened). Depends
on the surface upon which it is used; darker surfaces absorb more light.
Two users on the same computer (at different times, of course) can say
they use their mouse a lot but that depends on the applications and
preferences of the user. Being "on the computer" a lot doesn't equate
to using the mouse a lot. I've used 6 Logitech (3 models), 4 Microsoft,
1 IBM, and 1 GE (and more at work). None come anywhere close to their
claims of battery life. All are heavier due to the batteries.

--
_________________________________________________________________
******** Post replies to newsgroup - Share with others ********
Email: lh_811newsATyahooDOTcom and append "=NEWS=" to Subject.
_________________________________________________________________
September 25, 2004 1:10:47 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

"Vanguardx" <see_signature> wrote in message
news:o $aBaLpoEHA.644@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> "Ron" <spam@kwic.com>
> wrote in news:eCYbo6joEHA.896@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl:
>>
>> I don't know what mouse you are using but my Microsoft cordless,
>> optical, wheel mouse gets about 6 months of use per set of AA's and
>> I am on the computer a lot. My old Microsoft cordless wheel mouse got
>> 3 months use with every set of AA's that I installed. If you only get
>> 40 days, there is something wrong with your mouse.
>
> Depends on your use. If you game a lot then the mouse is in constant
> motion and never gets to sleep (or it shouldn't be allowed to sleep;
> otherwise, you'll be stuck in the game until it get awakened). Depends on
> the surface upon which it is used; darker surfaces absorb more light. Two
> users on the same computer (at different times, of course) can say they
> use their mouse a lot but that depends on the applications and preferences
> of the user. Being "on the computer" a lot doesn't equate to using the
> mouse a lot. I've used 6 Logitech (3 models), 4 Microsoft, 1 IBM, and 1
> GE (and more at work). None come anywhere close to their claims of
> battery life. All are heavier due to the batteries.

My activities use the mouse a lot. It isn't just sitting there and I stand
by what I wrote.
!