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Plan to go to DSL questions

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  • Wireless
  • DSL
  • Computers
  • Wireless Networking
Last response: in Wireless Networking
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August 16, 2004 2:40:29 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

I have a slow 56k modem right night, but I am planning to finally switch to
DSL...is it that much better than 56K?? Is the added $15-$20 extra a month
worth it?? Also, I plan to go wireless with 3 computers in my house. How
easy is it to setup wireless on all three computers? From my readings it
seems one router is needed along with the wireless modems to all three
computers. Sounds too easy though. Any info appreciated.

More about : plan dsl questions

Anonymous
a b F Wireless
August 16, 2004 2:54:26 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

snow wrote:
> I have a slow 56k modem right night, but I am planning to finally switch to
> DSL...is it that much better than 56K?? Is the added $15-$20 extra a month
> worth it?? Also, I plan to go wireless with 3 computers in my house. How
> easy is it to setup wireless on all three computers? From my readings it
> seems one router is needed along with the wireless modems to all three
> computers. Sounds too easy though. Any info appreciated.
>
>

DSL is about 20 times faster speed may very with ISP.


You may want to check out this site:

http://www.dslreports.com/faq/6696

http://www.dslreports.com/

http://www.dslreports.com/sitesearch?md5=1987e8e5ce01b4...

http://www.dslreports.com/faq/9688


--
Danny Kile
Certified FCC, ISCET, A+

Please reply to the Newsgroup ONLY
Your cooperation is appreciated.
August 16, 2004 7:22:48 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

DSL is very simple it will either work or it won't.
I had a friend who just setup a DSL connection.
He is not very computer literate, but his works fine.
To go wireless you will need a wireless router for DSL which
is the same routers used for cable.
"snow" <dlessard@powerlink.net> wrote in message
news:10i07jic766g98@corp.supernews.com...
> I have a slow 56k modem right night, but I am planning to finally switch
to
> DSL...is it that much better than 56K?? Is the added $15-$20 extra a month
> worth it?? Also, I plan to go wireless with 3 computers in my house. How
> easy is it to setup wireless on all three computers? From my readings it
> seems one router is needed along with the wireless modems to all three
> computers. Sounds too easy though. Any info appreciated.
>
>
Related resources
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
August 17, 2004 6:51:00 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

You will need a wireless router. the computer close to the router could be
hard wired (cat 5) while the distant computers could be connected by a
wireless adapter on each.
Once you have broadband, you can't go back to dial up.
Dial up on a 3 computer LAN would be unbearable.


"BigJIm" <woody10277@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:cMVTc.319107$XM6.260671@attbi_s53...
> DSL is very simple it will either work or it won't.
> I had a friend who just setup a DSL connection.
> He is not very computer literate, but his works fine.
> To go wireless you will need a wireless router for DSL which
> is the same routers used for cable.
> "snow" <dlessard@powerlink.net> wrote in message
> news:10i07jic766g98@corp.supernews.com...
> > I have a slow 56k modem right night, but I am planning to finally switch
> to
> > DSL...is it that much better than 56K?? Is the added $15-$20 extra a
month
> > worth it?? Also, I plan to go wireless with 3 computers in my house. How
> > easy is it to setup wireless on all three computers? From my readings it
> > seems one router is needed along with the wireless modems to all three
> > computers. Sounds too easy though. Any info appreciated.
> >
> >
>
>
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
August 17, 2004 12:56:14 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

One thing others did not mention is the fact that dsl will not tie up
your phone line. Just on the speed alone, you will never go back.

Setting up wireless to the other computers is a snap.

Kingfish

On Sun, 15 Aug 2004 22:40:29 -0400, "snow" <dlessard@powerlink.net>
wrote:

>I have a slow 56k modem right night, but I am planning to finally switch to
>DSL...is it that much better than 56K?? Is the added $15-$20 extra a month
>worth it?? Also, I plan to go wireless with 3 computers in my house. How
>easy is it to setup wireless on all three computers? From my readings it
>seems one router is needed along with the wireless modems to all three
>computers. Sounds too easy though. Any info appreciated.
>
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
August 17, 2004 8:15:53 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

"snow" <dlessard@powerlink.net> wrote in message
news:10i07jic766g98@corp.supernews.com...
> I have a slow 56k modem right night, but I am planning to finally switch
to
> DSL...is it that much better than 56K?? Is the added $15-$20 extra a month
> worth it?? Also, I plan to go wireless with 3 computers in my house. How
> easy is it to setup wireless on all three computers? From my readings it
> seems one router is needed along with the wireless modems to all three
> computers. Sounds too easy though. Any info appreciated.
>

Pro:

1. If you have a second phone line for Internet access, you can disconnect
it and DSL may actually save you money.
2. A broadband connection will enable you to switch some long-distance to
VoIP, and save the long distance charges.
3. No more waiting for long logins.
4. If fact, no more waiting for most things: you won't believe you ever did
without it, especially during off hours when end-to-end transfer rates can
exceed 1.5 Mbps. That's as fast (at least on downloads) as a T1 line, and
since your machine can be left connected, your email will be waiting for you
instead of vice-versa.

Con:

1. You _MUST_ have a firewall. An always-on connection is a favorite target
for hackers.
2. You _MUST_ keep up with all security patches and AntiVirus updates. Plan
at least an hour each week _FOR EVERY MACHINE_.
3. You need to know more about your machine, and how to disable unneeded
services such as "Personal Web Server".
4. You'll have to pay more attention to Adware/Spyware: some of the
companies pushing this vileware advertise that they have a distributed
network of computers - if you have their software, that includes yours -
available for rent. They _love_ broadband connections and always-on
machines. Budget another hour or two for Spy/Adware scans each week, _FOR
EVERY MACHINE_.
5. It's more expensive to change providers.
6. If you depend on modem connections for mobile computing, you might have
to pay extra for the option. Although WiFi hotspots are available in most
airports, WiFi comes with a raft of security concerns, and your company
might insist on modem access only.
7. Don't assume that a WiFi network will be Plug-'N-Pray. You might have to
rearrange equipment two or more times to get the right mix of "hot spots"
for all your machines.

FWIW:

1. Verizon (probably others) makes you use their custom CD for
installations, which puts _THEIR_ Spyware on your machine, and they won't
give you a logon or password until you do. It's worth your time to connect
an old machine just for the signup, and then nuke it: your router will
handle the logon for you once you know the id and pw, and (unless you like
MSN) you don't need the other software. If you don't have a spare machine,
then Ghost your existing drive, and move the snapshot back onto the drive
once your router has taken over PPOE chores.
2. Make sure _all_ your WiFi cards are from the same manufacturer. If you
get a Linksys router, get Linksys PCI and/or PCMCIA cards: manuafacturers
are always trying to one-up each other with proprietary features that only
work in their product family.
3. _NEVER_ buy generic wireless cards: the extra price for brand names
translates to extra range and fewer problems. Anyone can build a
transmitter - I've done it - but RF Spread-Spectrum receiver design is where
the big boys play, and they play at the major manufacturers' labs.
4. WiFi security is important. Some providers (e.g.Verizon) offer
802.11B-compatible router/access point hardware with their packages. Upgrade
to 802.11g when you make the deal: not only is it ~5 times faster, but it
has much better security. Don't try to cheap out on this: get the "G" router
with your package, and don't take 'no' for an answer. Don't forget you'll
also need 802.11G cards for your PC's.

HTH. YMMV.

William

--
William Warren
(Filter noise from my address for direct replies.)
!