Repairing a Motherboard

Greetings!

The MB in my system somehow got fried! It seems as if 3 of the capacitors "popped". Is it worth repairing? Having someone repair it for me? The board in question is an MSI K7T266 Pro. I have already replaced it with an Asus A7N8X Deluxe so if I repaired the MSI it would be used as an upgrade in my kids computer (which is currently running a PIII 500 MHz so it desperately needs to be upgrades and I prefer AMD.

Thanks for any info (including where I can find someone to repair this MSI motherboard)

Thanks!
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  1. It's repairable.

    <font color=blue>You're posting in a forum with class. It may be third class, but it's still class!</font color=blue>
  2. I wouldn't repair it. You can get a refurbished mobo for as little as $39 shipped at newegg.
  3. You're forgetting that the replacement board might have the same defective caps as the original, and that the repaired board will be "better than new" as the replacement caps will be of better quality.

    <font color=blue>You're posting in a forum with class. It may be third class, but it's still class!</font color=blue>
  4. OK, repairing is an option but is there anyplace I can send it to that won't charge me $100 to repair a MB that I can replace for less than that now????

    Thanks
  5. Oh, repair assumes YOU have certain soldering skills!

    <font color=blue>You're posting in a forum with class. It may be third class, but it's still class!</font color=blue>
  6. Personally I would upgrade to a newer board unless you can get the repair done for less than $50 or do it yourself. Have you found anyone that can do it. Can you get the parts?

    <font color=red>The solution may be obvious, but I can't see it for the smoke coming off my processor.</font color=red>
  7. Greetings!

    I do have some soldering skills but they are more along the line of soldering copper pipe for plumbing and soldering wires for household electrical. I am sure I could do it but don't want to f anything up!

    I have to check to see if I can get the parts needed, then I may just give it a shot. I think I have a friend who would probably be able to help me with the soldering or he would definitely know someone who could do it, although they may live in the UK or Vancouver Canada and I am in NY!

    Thanks
  8. Quote:
    I am sure I could do it but don't want to f anything up!

    It's already f'd up! :smile: Give it a shot. All that you lose is the price of the capacitors and time.

    To start press any key. Where's the "any" key? --Homer Simpson.
  9. I hope you can take care of it.

    <font color=red>The solution may be obvious, but I can't see it for the smoke coming off my processor.</font color=red>
  10. Like Black_Cat said, all you have to loose is the price of capacitors and time. I was able to accomplish high quality results my first time! A couple things to remember:
    1.) Some connections are made inside the board itself, so a "dry hole" is undesireable. I suggest you fill the hole with solder before inserting the new capacitor.
    2.) With solder in the hole, it's simply a matter of pushing the pins against the solder and then melting the solder from the back side.
    3.) Your replacement caps might have wider pin spacing, you can bend the pins to match. Cut the pins off so that they are just long enough to poke through the board, that way you won't drag the solder out of the hole as you insert the pins.

    <font color=blue>You're posting in a forum with class. It may be third class, but it's still class!</font color=blue>
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