Cant change memory in BIOS Of 4535

Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

Anyone know why I can't access the memory of my BIOS's first page in my
Pavilion 4535? (I cant find a BIOS update from the 4.06 Rev 1.03, - dated
1999, - anywhere but) I can't scroll down below the IDE area where it
recognises the drives or CD-ROMs to the first slot or change the second slot
(which shows empty) to reflect the fact that I put another 64 meg DIMM in
it. (I did check that it was the same 100 MHz memory as the one in the
first slot)

As I remember it, it seemed to count 128 meg the first time I booted up and
worked much faster: Then I installed Systemworks.

Now only 64 Meg of the RAM gets read. And the HP splash screen hangs there
for not c. five seconds but OVER a minute for no apparent reason.Possibly
these two points are linked? I can't suspect my memory died immediately
after I put it in there?


"Brothers and Sisters have I none
"But that man's father is my father's Son"
6 answers Last reply
More about cant change memory bios 4535
  1. Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    If the BIOS has an option to clear CMOS, do it, then see what happens.

    The motherboard autodetects whatever memory you put into the system. You do not
    change the amount of memory in the BIOS. If the system fails to recognize the
    added 64MB, either the added stick of memory is bad or it is incompatible with
    the motherboard. DIMMs often all look superficially the same, but they have
    differing speeds, serial presence detect PALs, buffered/unbuffered,
    registered/unregistered, parity/non-parity... Ben Myers

    On Fri, 18 Jun 2004 22:28:09 -0400, "My father's son"
    <myfathersson@nospam.rcn.com> wrote:

    >Anyone know why I can't access the memory of my BIOS's first page in my
    >Pavilion 4535? (I cant find a BIOS update from the 4.06 Rev 1.03, - dated
    >1999, - anywhere but) I can't scroll down below the IDE area where it
    >recognises the drives or CD-ROMs to the first slot or change the second slot
    >(which shows empty) to reflect the fact that I put another 64 meg DIMM in
    >it. (I did check that it was the same 100 MHz memory as the one in the
    >first slot)
    >
    >As I remember it, it seemed to count 128 meg the first time I booted up and
    >worked much faster: Then I installed Systemworks.
    >
    >Now only 64 Meg of the RAM gets read. And the HP splash screen hangs there
    >for not c. five seconds but OVER a minute for no apparent reason.Possibly
    >these two points are linked? I can't suspect my memory died immediately
    >after I put it in there?
    >
    >
    >"Brothers and Sisters have I none
    > "But that man's father is my father's Son"
    >
    >
  2. Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    Thanks Ben

    I didnt realise this about those older DIMMS, - my experience had been that
    if you put the wrong memory in the unit, the whole computer wouldnt boot, it
    would just turn on a few lights and the fan and then stop completely.

    That was how I discovered what you now tell me and not before I had thrown
    away a few probably working computers which wouldnt boot possibly for these
    reasons.

    That and the fact that I bought some 64 Meg DIMMS a few weeks ago to use as
    spares and when I got them home I discovered that although the same size,
    they didn't fit at all (different notches even) , being both Rambus DIMMS,
    one being a Kingston KVR800X16-4/64 while the other is a NEC non-ecc
    MC-4R64CPE6C-653. I cant even figure out whether they are the same (ie
    matched). And now I am trying to fugure out what on earth they DO fit into
    to see if there is any chance I might ever be able to use them!

    But all is not lost: Kingston does owe me a 64 meg DIMM for 2 32 meg Dell
    Dimendion DIMMs which stopped working AFTER they had stopped producing them
    so now I can tell them which ones I need by quoting the model number of this
    pavilion unit

    MFS


    <ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
    news:40d3c082.19494683@news.charter.net...
    > If the BIOS has an option to clear CMOS, do it, then see what happens.
    >
    > The motherboard autodetects whatever memory you put into the system. You
    do not
    > change the amount of memory in the BIOS. If the system fails to recognize
    the
    > added 64MB, either the added stick of memory is bad or it is incompatible
    with
    > the motherboard. DIMMs often all look superficially the same, but they
    have
    > differing speeds, serial presence detect PALs, buffered/unbuffered,
    > registered/unregistered, parity/non-parity... Ben Myers
    >
    > On Fri, 18 Jun 2004 22:28:09 -0400, "My father's son"
    > <myfathersson@nospam.rcn.com> wrote:
    >
    > >Anyone know why I can't access the memory of my BIOS's first page in my
    > >Pavilion 4535? (I cant find a BIOS update from the 4.06 Rev 1.03, - dated
    > >1999, - anywhere but) I can't scroll down below the IDE area where it
    > >recognises the drives or CD-ROMs to the first slot or change the second
    slot
    > >(which shows empty) to reflect the fact that I put another 64 meg DIMM in
    > >it. (I did check that it was the same 100 MHz memory as the one in the
    > >first slot)
    > >
    > >As I remember it, it seemed to count 128 meg the first time I booted up
    and
    > >worked much faster: Then I installed Systemworks.
    > >
    > >Now only 64 Meg of the RAM gets read. And the HP splash screen hangs
    there
    > >for not c. five seconds but OVER a minute for no apparent
    reason.Possibly
    > >these two points are linked? I can't suspect my memory died immediately
    > >after I put it in there?
    > >
    > >
    > >"Brothers and Sisters have I none
    > > "But that man's father is my father's Son"
    > >
    > >
    >
  3. Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    From the numbers, Kingston KVR800X16-4/64 is a PC800 64MB Rambus RIMM and NEC
    MC-4R64CPE6C-653 is a PC600 64MB RIMM. They are not quite matched but may work
    OK together in a motherboard that supports the lower speed. With Pentium 4
    systems using the Intel 850 chipset, RAMBUS memory has to be installed in
    matched pairs. With Pentium III systems and the Intel 820 chipset, RAMBUS
    memory can be installed singly. In either case, the vacant RIMM sockets must be
    occupied by "continuity modules", which look like chipless RIMMs... Ben Myers

    On Sat, 19 Jun 2004 11:41:27 -0400, "My father's son"
    <myfathersson@nospam.rcn.com> wrote:

    >Thanks Ben
    >
    >I didnt realise this about those older DIMMS, - my experience had been that
    >if you put the wrong memory in the unit, the whole computer wouldnt boot, it
    >would just turn on a few lights and the fan and then stop completely.
    >
    >That was how I discovered what you now tell me and not before I had thrown
    >away a few probably working computers which wouldnt boot possibly for these
    >reasons.
    >
    >That and the fact that I bought some 64 Meg DIMMS a few weeks ago to use as
    >spares and when I got them home I discovered that although the same size,
    >they didn't fit at all (different notches even) , being both Rambus DIMMS,
    >one being a Kingston KVR800X16-4/64 while the other is a NEC non-ecc
    >MC-4R64CPE6C-653. I cant even figure out whether they are the same (ie
    >matched). And now I am trying to fugure out what on earth they DO fit into
    >to see if there is any chance I might ever be able to use them!
    >
    >But all is not lost: Kingston does owe me a 64 meg DIMM for 2 32 meg Dell
    >Dimendion DIMMs which stopped working AFTER they had stopped producing them
    >so now I can tell them which ones I need by quoting the model number of this
    >pavilion unit
    >
    >MFS
    >
    >
    ><ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
    >news:40d3c082.19494683@news.charter.net...
    >> If the BIOS has an option to clear CMOS, do it, then see what happens.
    >>
    >> The motherboard autodetects whatever memory you put into the system. You
    >do not
    >> change the amount of memory in the BIOS. If the system fails to recognize
    >the
    >> added 64MB, either the added stick of memory is bad or it is incompatible
    >with
    >> the motherboard. DIMMs often all look superficially the same, but they
    >have
    >> differing speeds, serial presence detect PALs, buffered/unbuffered,
    >> registered/unregistered, parity/non-parity... Ben Myers
    >>
    >> On Fri, 18 Jun 2004 22:28:09 -0400, "My father's son"
    >> <myfathersson@nospam.rcn.com> wrote:
    >>
    >> >Anyone know why I can't access the memory of my BIOS's first page in my
    >> >Pavilion 4535? (I cant find a BIOS update from the 4.06 Rev 1.03, - dated
    >> >1999, - anywhere but) I can't scroll down below the IDE area where it
    >> >recognises the drives or CD-ROMs to the first slot or change the second
    >slot
    >> >(which shows empty) to reflect the fact that I put another 64 meg DIMM in
    >> >it. (I did check that it was the same 100 MHz memory as the one in the
    >> >first slot)
    >> >
    >> >As I remember it, it seemed to count 128 meg the first time I booted up
    >and
    >> >worked much faster: Then I installed Systemworks.
    >> >
    >> >Now only 64 Meg of the RAM gets read. And the HP splash screen hangs
    >there
    >> >for not c. five seconds but OVER a minute for no apparent
    >reason.Possibly
    >> >these two points are linked? I can't suspect my memory died immediately
    >> >after I put it in there?
    >> >
    >> >
    >> >"Brothers and Sisters have I none
    >> > "But that man's father is my father's Son"
    >> >
    >> >
    >>
    >
    >
  4. Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    Hi again Ben

    Here's the scoop: I have just finished a few hours worth of time wasting
    with HP support in which we finally identified that two exclamation marks in
    the primary and secondary IDE dual FIFO position in device manager probably
    means that the hard drive controller on the mobo is on its way out, That
    coupled with insertion of another hard drive with a working Windows 95
    installation on it which shows the same error on the Primary IDE in IT'S
    device manager. Although you were right about the memory. When I put new
    Kingston memory in which I got from Kinsgton for this purpose, the unit
    configured itself as you said it would and started working properly BUT
    problems with the mobo cropped up within a week or so of use.

    This is a smallish computer which seems to have a Hawk (or an Asus?)
    motherboard.

    Do you happen to know which other motherboards I can change this for in
    order to get it working, possibly with an upgraded system? I suspect that
    any Pentium 11 slot system wouldnt physically fit into this size box but am
    I stuck with an under 500 MHz celeron system? (in which case this isn't SO
    disastrous as such a mobo might be quite inexpensive AND I already have a
    400 as well as a 466 Celeron processor) Or is the Pavilion mobo some type
    of special design to get it into this size box?

    MFS
    <ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
    news:40d4aa12.646983@news.charter.net...
    > From the numbers, Kingston KVR800X16-4/64 is a PC800 64MB Rambus RIMM and
    NEC
    > MC-4R64CPE6C-653 is a PC600 64MB RIMM. They are not quite matched but may
    work
    > OK together in a motherboard that supports the lower speed. With Pentium
    4
    > systems using the Intel 850 chipset, RAMBUS memory has to be installed in
    > matched pairs. With Pentium III systems and the Intel 820 chipset, RAMBUS
    > memory can be installed singly. In either case, the vacant RIMM sockets
    must be
    > occupied by "continuity modules", which look like chipless RIMMs... Ben
    Myers
    >
    > On Sat, 19 Jun 2004 11:41:27 -0400, "My father's son"
    > <myfathersson@nospam.rcn.com> wrote:
    >
    > >Thanks Ben
    > >
    > >I didnt realise this about those older DIMMS, - my experience had been
    that
    > >if you put the wrong memory in the unit, the whole computer wouldnt boot,
    it
    > >would just turn on a few lights and the fan and then stop completely.
    > >
    > >That was how I discovered what you now tell me and not before I had
    thrown
    > >away a few probably working computers which wouldnt boot possibly for
    these
    > >reasons.
    > >
    > >That and the fact that I bought some 64 Meg DIMMS a few weeks ago to use
    as
    > >spares and when I got them home I discovered that although the same size,
    > >they didn't fit at all (different notches even) , being both Rambus
    DIMMS,
    > >one being a Kingston KVR800X16-4/64 while the other is a NEC non-ecc
    > >MC-4R64CPE6C-653. I cant even figure out whether they are the same (ie
    > >matched). And now I am trying to fugure out what on earth they DO fit
    into
    > >to see if there is any chance I might ever be able to use them!
    > >
    > >But all is not lost: Kingston does owe me a 64 meg DIMM for 2 32 meg
    Dell
    > >Dimendion DIMMs which stopped working AFTER they had stopped producing
    them
    > >so now I can tell them which ones I need by quoting the model number of
    this
    > >pavilion unit
    > >
    > >MFS
    > >
    > >
    > ><ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
    > >news:40d3c082.19494683@news.charter.net...
    > >> If the BIOS has an option to clear CMOS, do it, then see what happens.
    > >>
    > >> The motherboard autodetects whatever memory you put into the system.
    You
    > >do not
    > >> change the amount of memory in the BIOS. If the system fails to
    recognize
    > >the
    > >> added 64MB, either the added stick of memory is bad or it is
    incompatible
    > >with
    > >> the motherboard. DIMMs often all look superficially the same, but they
    > >have
    > >> differing speeds, serial presence detect PALs, buffered/unbuffered,
    > >> registered/unregistered, parity/non-parity... Ben Myers
    > >>
    > >> On Fri, 18 Jun 2004 22:28:09 -0400, "My father's son"
    > >> <myfathersson@nospam.rcn.com> wrote:
    > >>
    > >> >Anyone know why I can't access the memory of my BIOS's first page in
    my
    > >> >Pavilion 4535? (I cant find a BIOS update from the 4.06 Rev 1.03, -
    dated
    > >> >1999, - anywhere but) I can't scroll down below the IDE area where it
    > >> >recognises the drives or CD-ROMs to the first slot or change the
    second
    > >slot
    > >> >(which shows empty) to reflect the fact that I put another 64 meg DIMM
    in
    > >> >it. (I did check that it was the same 100 MHz memory as the one in
    the
    > >> >first slot)
    > >> >
    > >> >As I remember it, it seemed to count 128 meg the first time I booted
    up
    > >and
    > >> >worked much faster: Then I installed Systemworks.
    > >> >
    > >> >Now only 64 Meg of the RAM gets read. And the HP splash screen hangs
    > >there
    > >> >for not c. five seconds but OVER a minute for no apparent
    > >reason.Possibly
    > >> >these two points are linked? I can't suspect my memory died
    immediately
    > >> >after I put it in there?
    > >> >
    > >> >
    > >> >"Brothers and Sisters have I none
    > >> > "But that man's father is my father's Son"
    > >> >
    > >> >
    > >>
    > >
    > >
    >
  5. Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    I would imagine that reformat and reinstall is part of Training 101 for
    name-brand tech support people worldwide, regardless of accent, country, gender,
    or brand of computer. With Micro$oft's can-of-worms operating system, it's much
    easier to blame Bill Gates and Steve Ballmer then to do real analysis of a
    hardware/software problem. And it can get buy the name-brand company time
    before having to honor a warranty.

    Those of us who make a living with hands-on troubleshooting of computers have a
    mixed blessing on our hands. On one hand, the work I do is essential to my
    clients, sometimes vital if their computers have important business or personal
    data, not backed up. On the other hand, I have had more than one strong
    reaction from a client who did not want to pay for my time almost as much as it
    cost for the computer hardware in the first place. Many computer owners have
    yet to intellectualize the concept that you get what you pay for. If you get a
    computer for cheap, something is going to be lacking.

    Tech support and warranty service are the easiest areas for name-brand companies
    to cut costs. So the strategy is two-fold: Move tech support offshore where
    people will work for maybe $3/hour. Delay, delay, delay any potential warranty
    issues, and find excuses not to honor warranties.

    The other area to save money or make more money, depending on how you look at
    these things, is with all the bogus rebates. Once again, delay, delay, delay
    and find nitpicking excuses not to make rebate payments, which, by the way, are
    outsourced, too. The outsourcing rebate handler and the name brand company
    negotiate a contract in which the rebate handler agrees to honor no more than X
    percent of all rebates. X is usually pretty small, like maybe 20 to 25 percent.

    .... Ben Myers

    On Fri, 16 Jul 2004 08:28:24 -0400, "My father's son"
    <myfathersson@nospam.rcn.com> wrote:

    >Hi Ben
    >
    >Actually I suspected that what you said was the case as he (1) seemed to
    >know what he was talking about but kept on going off-line to ask someone who
    >DID know what was going on and
    >(2) when finally pushed, told me to format the hard drive and reinstall the
    >OS which I take to be an absolute indicator that the guy couldnt cure (or
    >even identify) the problem.
    >
    >But what confused me was Hewlett Packard's tenacity in trying to assist
    >before getting to that stage and AFTER I had had a few e-mail interchanges
    >with people who also didn't just give me obviously wrong answers (meaning
    >that it WASN'T just a computer somewhere trying to identify key words in a
    >question and send out wrong answers automatically like companies like
    >Symantec do).
    >
    >I have had Toshiba support people with indian accents try to get me to
    >format the hard drive and re-install the OS after two questions along the
    >lines of 'why cant I get my SCSI devices to work' (when the answer was
    >something to do with termination) so I know all about the
    >stuff-coming-out-of-ears syndrome.
    >
    >Many thanks for your suggestions which I will do today or tomorrow when I
    >get a chance: (I already have numerous bootdisc.com floppies around
    >somwhere).
    >
    >MFS
  6. Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    Ben

    But I have a further problem to report despite all that: I went to the Intel
    site and there seemed to be four chipset drivers which may have been
    relevant: A graphics one which I loaded, an audio codecs one which I thought
    might prevent the exclamation marks by all the audio entries in Device
    manager (but which didnt), a data accelerator which installed and the basic
    chiopset one which I tried ot install but which merely told me that the ATA
    driver I have in is completely up to date and doesnt need (or cant be?)
    overwritten.

    So I still have the two exclamation marks by the IDE devices

    MFS


    <ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
    news:40f7e0b4.3959179@news.charter.net...
    > I would imagine that reformat and reinstall is part of Training 101 for
    > name-brand tech support people worldwide, regardless of accent, country,
    gender,
    > or brand of computer. With Micro$oft's can-of-worms operating system,
    it's much
    > easier to blame Bill Gates and Steve Ballmer then to do real analysis of a
    > hardware/software problem. And it can get buy the name-brand company time
    > before having to honor a warranty.
    >
    > Those of us who make a living with hands-on troubleshooting of computers
    have a
    > mixed blessing on our hands. On one hand, the work I do is essential to
    my
    > clients, sometimes vital if their computers have important business or
    personal
    > data, not backed up. On the other hand, I have had more than one strong
    > reaction from a client who did not want to pay for my time almost as much
    as it
    > cost for the computer hardware in the first place. Many computer owners
    have
    > yet to intellectualize the concept that you get what you pay for. If you
    get a
    > computer for cheap, something is going to be lacking.
    >
    > Tech support and warranty service are the easiest areas for name-brand
    companies
    > to cut costs. So the strategy is two-fold: Move tech support offshore
    where
    > people will work for maybe $3/hour. Delay, delay, delay any potential
    warranty
    > issues, and find excuses not to honor warranties.
    >
    > The other area to save money or make more money, depending on how you look
    at
    > these things, is with all the bogus rebates. Once again, delay, delay,
    delay
    > and find nitpicking excuses not to make rebate payments, which, by the
    way, are
    > outsourced, too. The outsourcing rebate handler and the name brand
    company
    > negotiate a contract in which the rebate handler agrees to honor no more
    than X
    > percent of all rebates. X is usually pretty small, like maybe 20 to 25
    percent.
    >
    > ... Ben Myers
    >
    > On Fri, 16 Jul 2004 08:28:24 -0400, "My father's son"
    > <myfathersson@nospam.rcn.com> wrote:
    >
    > >Hi Ben
    > >
    > >Actually I suspected that what you said was the case as he (1) seemed to
    > >know what he was talking about but kept on going off-line to ask someone
    who
    > >DID know what was going on and
    > >(2) when finally pushed, told me to format the hard drive and reinstall
    the
    > >OS which I take to be an absolute indicator that the guy couldnt cure (or
    > >even identify) the problem.
    > >
    > >But what confused me was Hewlett Packard's tenacity in trying to assist
    > >before getting to that stage and AFTER I had had a few e-mail
    interchanges
    > >with people who also didn't just give me obviously wrong answers (meaning
    > >that it WASN'T just a computer somewhere trying to identify key words in
    a
    > >question and send out wrong answers automatically like companies like
    > >Symantec do).
    > >
    > >I have had Toshiba support people with indian accents try to get me to
    > >format the hard drive and re-install the OS after two questions along the
    > >lines of 'why cant I get my SCSI devices to work' (when the answer was
    > >something to do with termination) so I know all about the
    > >stuff-coming-out-of-ears syndrome.
    > >
    > >Many thanks for your suggestions which I will do today or tomorrow when I
    > >get a chance: (I already have numerous bootdisc.com floppies around
    > >somwhere).
    > >
    > >MFS
    >
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