system state backup vs. system restore point

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

(XP Home SP2)

Hi - I know that the 'system state' option in NTbackup is limited to
system files, and system restore tries to cover files all over the
computer. But I find that using system restore can have some
non-intuitive behavior (nothing serious, but sometimes it doesn't quite
get everything the way I would expect in outlying folders), and I'm
wondering. If all I'm going to do is install a piece of software, and
I'm concerned that I won't like it and immediately do an uninstall, is
it safer to use system state backup and restore (knowing that this won't
effect anything out of the system areas, which is an advantage in this
case), rather than to risk the possibly more substantial behavior of a
system restore operation for something this minor. System restore
strikes me as something to use when you have to go back days, rather
than minutes, and you're willing to have to do some cleanup to get
everything right again.

thanks!
/j
5 answers Last reply
More about system state backup system restore point
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    System Restore is what I would use, but it seems you do not want to,
    Jeff. ASR is a much larger operation

    How to Set up and Use Automated System Recovery in Windows XP
    http://www.microsoft.com/technet/prodtechnol/winxppro/maintain/asr.mspx

    " The wizard backs up the system state, system services, and all
    disks associated with the operating system components. It also
    creates a file containing information about the backup, the disk
    configurations (including basic and dynamic volumes) and how to
    accomplish a restore. "


    Frequently Asked Questions Regarding System Restore in Windows XP
    http://www.microsoft.com/technet/community/newsgroups/faqsrwxp.mspx

    " How is System Restore different from Backup?

    Answer: Unlike System Restore which monitors only a core set of
    specified system and application file types (e.g. .exe, .dll etc),
    the Backup Utility usually backs up all files including users
    personal data files, ensuring a safe copy stored either on the local
    disk or to another medium. System Restore does not monitor changes
    to or recover users' personal data files such as documents,
    drawings, e-mail, and so forth. While system data contained in
    System Restore's restore points are available to restore to for only
    a limited period of time (by default restore points older than 90
    days are deleted), backups taken by the Backup Utility can be
    recovered anytime.

    What files are monitored by System Restore?

    Answer: System Restore monitors only a core set of specified system
    and application file types (e.g. .exe, .dll etc), archiving the
    states of these files before system changes are made. System Restore
    does not monitor any user/personal data files. To view the included
    files specified in System Restore, see Monitored File Extensions in
    the System Restore section of the Platform SDK available from
    http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/en-us/sr/sr/monitored_file_extensions.asp
    "

    MowGreen [MVP]
    ===============
    *-343-* FDNY
    Never Forgotten
    ===============

    Jeff W wrote:

    > (XP Home SP2)
    >
    > Hi - I know that the 'system state' option in NTbackup is limited to
    > system files, and system restore tries to cover files all over the
    > computer. But I find that using system restore can have some
    > non-intuitive behavior (nothing serious, but sometimes it doesn't quite
    > get everything the way I would expect in outlying folders), and I'm
    > wondering. If all I'm going to do is install a piece of software, and
    > I'm concerned that I won't like it and immediately do an uninstall, is
    > it safer to use system state backup and restore (knowing that this won't
    > effect anything out of the system areas, which is an advantage in this
    > case), rather than to risk the possibly more substantial behavior of a
    > system restore operation for something this minor. System restore
    > strikes me as something to use when you have to go back days, rather
    > than minutes, and you're willing to have to do some cleanup to get
    > everything right again.
    >
    > thanks!
    > /j
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    not a question of want - i think the hierarchy of severeness is

    least:
    NTBackup of system state
    system restore
    ASR
    most

    I have XP home so i'm notsure I can use ASR. I'm just wondering if
    NTbackup with system state is a LESS disruptive, yet effective approach
    for a small rollback
    /j

    >
    >
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    An Error Message Is Displayed When You Attempt to Use the Automated
    System Recovery Wizard
    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/302700/EN-US/

    " This behavior can occur because ASR is not supported in Windows XP
    Home Edition. However, Windows XP Home Edition users can access the
    ASR Wizard if they install the Ntbackup program from the Valueadd
    folder on the Windows XP Home Edition CD-ROM. "

    As to why one would choose Restore over Backup :

    Files That Are Automatically Skipped by the Backup Program
    (NTBackup.exe) During the Backup and Restore Processes
    http://support.microsoft.com/?id=104169

    The choice is yours, Jeff.


    MowGreen [MVP]
    ===============
    *-343-* FDNY
    Never Forgotten
    ===============


    Jeff W wrote:

    > not a question of want - i think the hierarchy of severeness is
    >
    > least:
    > NTBackup of system state
    > system restore
    > ASR
    > most
    >
    > I have XP home so i'm notsure I can use ASR. I'm just wondering if
    > NTbackup with system state is a LESS disruptive, yet effective approach
    > for a small rollback
    > /j
    >
    >
    >>
    >>
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    Did you read the article you gave a link to? It says

    "The information in this article applies only if Backup cannot do a
    volume shadow copy backup or if you select the *Disable volume shadow
    copy* option in the *Advanced* dialog box for an individual backup job."

    So if I don't set the "skip files" option, it doesn't.

    Which means my question remains - hopefully someone has a good answer
    /j


    MowGreen [MVP] wrote:

    >An Error Message Is Displayed When You Attempt to Use the Automated
    >System Recovery Wizard
    >http://support.microsoft.com/kb/302700/EN-US/
    >
    >" This behavior can occur because ASR is not supported in Windows XP
    >Home Edition. However, Windows XP Home Edition users can access the
    >ASR Wizard if they install the Ntbackup program from the Valueadd
    >folder on the Windows XP Home Edition CD-ROM. "
    >
    >As to why one would choose Restore over Backup :
    >
    >Files That Are Automatically Skipped by the Backup Program
    >(NTBackup.exe) During the Backup and Restore Processes
    >http://support.microsoft.com/?id=104169
    >
    >The choice is yours, Jeff.
    >
    >
    >MowGreen [MVP]
    >===============
    > *-343-* FDNY
    >Never Forgotten
    >===============
    >
    >
    >Jeff W wrote:
    >
    >> not a question of want - i think the hierarchy of severeness is
    >>
    >> least:
    >> NTBackup of system state
    >> system restore
    >> ASR
    >> most
    >>
    >> I have XP home so i'm notsure I can use ASR. I'm just wondering if
    >> NTbackup with system state is a LESS disruptive, yet effective approach
    >> for a small rollback
    >> /j
    >>
    >>
    >>>
    >>>
    >
    >
    >
  5. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    Jeff W wrote:
    > (XP Home SP2)
    >
    > Hi - I know that the 'system state' option in NTbackup is limited to
    > system files, and system restore tries to cover files all over the
    > computer. But I find that using system restore can have some
    > non-intuitive behavior (nothing serious, but sometimes it doesn't
    > quite get everything the way I would expect in outlying folders), and
    > I'm wondering. If all I'm going to do is install a piece of
    > software, and I'm concerned that I won't like it and immediately do
    > an uninstall, is it safer to use system state backup and restore
    > (knowing that this won't effect anything out of the system areas,
    > which is an advantage in this case), rather than to risk the possibly
    > more substantial behavior of a system restore operation for something
    > this minor. System restore strikes me as something to use when you
    > have to go back days, rather than minutes, and you're willing to have
    > to do some cleanup to get everything right again.
    >
    > thanks!
    > /j

    It seems to me that what you need is Total Uninstall
    http://www.geocities.com/ggmartau/tu.html
    HTH,
    OldKenGoat


    To reply JUNK the NOJUNK!
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