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2K Drops BioShock DRM

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June 20, 2008 7:11:09 PM

Article by Kevin Parrish

2K has announced that the PC version of BioShock will no longer be subjected to SecuROM's DRM software and activation limits. But is 2K's move a year too late?

http://www.tomsgames.com/us/2008/06/20/bioshockdrm_dropped/

More about : drops bioshock drm

June 20, 2008 8:53:29 PM

An outstanding decision. I will now look at buying Bioshock... if it's on sale... and I can't find it pirated... and my friends don't have a copy... and I get caught stealing it at Walmart...
June 20, 2008 10:34:24 PM

A good sign. If Mass Effect for the PC does this, I will buy it, same with spore, but activation limits are unforgivable.
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June 20, 2008 10:59:51 PM

The only bad thing about this, other than waiting almost a year to do it, is that SecuROM isn't removed from the game. It's just been disabled. But I know I share a lot of people's opinion when I write that having that stuff on my system still unsettles me.
June 21, 2008 2:46:17 AM

Well lets hear it, why does it unsettle you so much?
June 21, 2008 6:46:26 AM

Without the install limitations, ideally it's no more intrusive than common systems. Online registration and a requirement for the CD/DVD, those things I can deal with.

So.. I guess now I should read reviews and decide if I want to buy it.
Maybe I'll be checking out Spore next year.
June 21, 2008 10:13:39 AM

at least it will be cheaper now
June 21, 2008 5:44:10 PM

Quote:
"If people want to play BioShock 10 years from now, they'll be able to play it."

I get to buy my games and play them too!! :bounce: 
June 21, 2008 6:25:36 PM

this is still pathetic... you still have securom installed... i posted on the 2k forums what i'll post here... Untill every trace of secrurom is removed, i WILL NOT buy any game containing it... they just don't get it.

boycott this pathetic excuse for 'game security'
June 22, 2008 4:01:19 AM

It's a step in the right direction. Not enough to convince me to buy their games again, but still a good sign. Hopefully next year they will sell games without bundled garbage and it will be safe to buy again. :) 
June 22, 2008 4:13:06 AM

yea, I know call me crazy and silly and ignorant but I have bioshock and mass effect both installed on my computer with no securom disabling patches and I can't say i've had any significant problems thus far in the last.. well since both games came out on pc lol

I guess stuff like this will bother some people, and it likely effects people running windows xp 32 a bit more than vista 64/32 - but i've never had the problem either truthfully..
June 22, 2008 8:08:36 AM

SECUrom is a good idea fundamentally - pirating is killing the PC market. However the way it's implemented (With limited installs/activations) is wrong in my opinion. For example i have 3 PCs in my house (HTPC, Gaming rig and laptop) and if i wanted to install it on all three which i believe i have every right to do as it'll only be me using it, then i'd only have one activation left!

I hope that soon developers come up with a pirate-proof way of securing game media, i think pirating is digusting. No different to going to a local shop and stealing from there.
June 22, 2008 9:45:44 AM

ovaltineplease said:
Well lets hear it, why does it unsettle you so much?


Securom is not installed as part of the game but as a separate entity (even worse: it will not be uninstalled when you unstall the game). That is unsettling about it. It can interfere with other parts of my system that have nothing to do with the game. In most cases it will not cause issues but in some it does, and when you install a game on your HDD then there is always a disclaimer there that the publisher/developer is not responsible for screwing up your system. In combination with not removing stuf when you uninstall that is a big no no for me.
June 22, 2008 3:26:25 PM

BigMac said:
Securom is not installed as part of the game but as a separate entity (even worse: it will not be uninstalled when you unstall the game). That is unsettling about it. It can interfere with other parts of my system that have nothing to do with the game. In most cases it will not cause issues but in some it does, and when you install a game on your HDD then there is always a disclaimer there that the publisher/developer is not responsible for screwing up your system. In combination with not removing stuf when you uninstall that is a big no no for me.


But you can easily remove it yourself. Just go into the directory and remove it, really isn't that hard.
June 22, 2008 9:50:43 PM

quantumsheep said:
But you can easily remove it yourself. Just go into the directory and remove it, really isn't that hard.


that wont work, it digs it's self deeper than that into your system, it shares similar traits to trojans and spyware, then way it installs it's self
June 22, 2008 10:51:08 PM

razor512 said:
that wont work, it digs it's self deeper than that into your system, it shares similar traits to trojans and spyware, then way it installs it's self


I'm sorry but this is bullcrap. It's perfectly simple to uninstall totally. If you're really that incompetent that you can't remove a simple piece of software i'd be glad to walk you through the process.
June 23, 2008 2:10:38 AM

razor512 said:
that wont work, it digs it's self deeper than that into your system, it shares similar traits to trojans and spyware, then way it installs it's self



Whether this may be true or not, my entire point which bigmac totally skipped is that these people are all scared of the GREAT EVILS OF SECUROM ! but they are more than happy to go onto warez sites which are ANYTHING BUT secure, and download cracks for their securom software

I'm aware that securom can interfere with things like deleting 16 bit apps but that is really a pittance of problems compared to the annoyance of browser/telnet hijacks from trojans and malware

I really feel like people blow this sort of thing way out of proportion - its one thing to say "yes I don't like securom", sure that is fair and well and I can agree to a degree that software designed to interfere with your pc is annoying and superfluous, especially when its crackable, apparently. Its another thing to say that you don't like securom interfering with your pc and then putting your pc under the exact same if not worse risk from other software though.

I'm NOT a proponent of Securom, but seriously I just wish that these losers using things like securom would just pay to put the damn games on STEAM instead of paying the jackasses at Sony a license fee to use Securom on their titles! :sarcastic: 
June 23, 2008 2:16:58 AM

Excellent point. It's really annoying if my game only works with the CD inside and/or if I'm connected to the Internet. If I'm on dial-up I don't want to block the phone line while I'm playing just because the game wants to call home. If I scratch the CD (and I will, eventually, if I have to insert it every day) my game will stop working, and I'll have to shell out another $50 (if I can even find it again). No wonder users look for cracks and get in trouble. I don't have a good solution, of course, but IMO Sony doesn't either :) 
June 23, 2008 4:21:22 AM

quantumsheep said:
I'm sorry but this is bullcrap. It's perfectly simple to uninstall totally. If you're really that incompetent that you can't remove a simple piece of software i'd be glad to walk you through the process.


Feel free to do so, here in the forum. The result of your process should be: having a securom protected game on the system, no longer playable because the securom protection is uninstalled. The not working game is to show that securom has really disappeared from the system, if you have another way of proving that it is gone, that will do just as well.
June 23, 2008 4:26:22 AM

ovaltineplease said:
Whether this may be true or not, my entire point which bigmac totally skipped is that these people are all scared of the GREAT EVILS OF SECUROM ! but they are more than happy to go onto warez sites which are ANYTHING BUT secure, and download cracks for their securom software


I did not skip it, it simply does not apply to me so I feel no need to address it. I am pretty much in control regarding what is installed on my system and what is not. I have no problem with whatever kind of protection on software as long as it does not meddle with that control.
June 23, 2008 10:29:31 AM

They should remove the DRM/SECUROM all the way.

2K doesn't trust STEAM, they put the DRM/SECUROM in that version too.

Its too late for this game, i only played the demo and i still won't run out an buy it, they need to remove all the DRM crap and then maybe i will think about buying this game.


June 23, 2008 1:37:14 PM

If you're the type of person who has to buy the CD for the game, then yeah the whole DRM/SECUROM thing sucks.

I bought BioShock through Steam and I didn't have to deal with this DRM/SECUROM crap.

That's one thing great about buying games online through outfits like Valve Steam as no CD is required. Just need to be logged into Steam to play. Not sure what happens if you're not connected to the internet.

Frenchy
June 23, 2008 2:30:48 PM

frenchy said:
That's one thing great about buying games online through outfits like Valve Steam as no CD is required. Just need to be logged into Steam to play. Not sure what happens if you're not connected to the internet.

Steam works in offline mode.
June 23, 2008 2:50:09 PM

Too little, too late.
June 23, 2008 2:51:40 PM

frenchy said:
I bought BioShock through Steam and I didn't have to deal with this DRM/SECUROM crap.


See the poster before yours, SecuROM is also in the version that is downloaded through Steam. If you bought it awhile back and tried to install it on multiple systems (more than the limit, or had your system upgraded/reinstalled multiple times) then you would have found out about it. However now that it has been disabled you will no longer be bothered by activation issues.
June 24, 2008 12:32:26 AM

quantumsheep said:
I'm sorry but this is bullcrap. It's perfectly simple to uninstall totally. If you're really that incompetent that you can't remove a simple piece of software i'd be glad to walk you through the process.



securom adds a number of files to the system 32 folder as well as the program files folder and the application data folder as well as the registry and many are not removed even when uninstall the games



if you trust your removal methods so much,

install spydawn you almost instantly get it if you head to some warez sites or porn sites using IE (just about every professional that is able to backup all important data on the clients pc would reformat than go through removing that infection)

then boot into safe mode then delete it's folder from the program files folder

then boot into normal mode then sell me if your still infected.




do a fresh install of windows

then download this program from microsoft called autoruns http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/bb96390...


then install a securom game

then uninstall the game

then run autoruns again and have it compare the preboot files

you will notice about 10+ items that will load preboot (preboot items load with the core sysem files and the drivers)
that are still there even after you remove the securom game and it's programs file folder entry

thats because most of the files used by securom are not located in the program files folder, there located in multiple areas in the windows folder and because they have weird or random names just like almost every other file in there, it is hard to find all of the securom files

also securom files are not standalone there many other files that those preboot auto running securom files use but the only way to find them is to either know the exact names and functions of all 15,627 files in the windows folder or not install securom in the first place

the problem with securom is that the auto running files it adds are randomly named (a practice used by trojans and viruses and spyware, they randomly name them self so you cant google them )
June 24, 2008 11:52:18 AM

Also Securom makes use of proprietary drivers and hidden registry entries, as well as having loaded a rootkit in the past. Not sure if it still does that though.

My major complaint however is with the limited installs. I will NOT call a game manufacturer and beg them to let me install the software I legally purchased. I WILL NOT DO IT! Therefore I will not buy games that expect me to jump through such hoops. If they want my money then they can release their games without additional annoyances that affect only paying customers.
June 24, 2008 12:57:05 PM

infornography42 said:
Also Securom makes use of proprietary drivers and hidden registry entries, as well as having loaded a rootkit in the past. Not sure if it still does that though.

My major complaint however is with the limited installs. I will NOT call a game manufacturer and beg them to let me install the software I legally purchased. I WILL NOT DO IT! Therefore I will not buy games that expect me to jump through such hoops. If they want my money then they can release their games without additional annoyances that affect only paying customers.


So you are not too concerned with the software that still lingers on your system, even if it is not used anymore? Because that's exactly what 2K is now doing with BioShock.

If this becomes standard policy, then it boils down to that you can just buy the game as soon as it's released unless you are sure you will run out of activations within a year. If you can only keep it to half a year tops with the limited activation policy, you could buy after six month of release, etc.

So what this DRM policy is accomplishing is to delay a significant percentage of income till later, part of this delayed revenue will vaporize because people will refuse to wait for half a year or longer and will get a pirated version, a percentage of potential customers will simply turn away from the game completely and will not return to it. The publisher will blame all the lost revenue on piracy.

No wonder we see these different figures between games with and without DRM, the latter actually doing better. At least without DRM the publisher will get the revenues that are potentially in the market, with the added bonus of people that will pirate a copy first and then decide to buy it afterwards because they love the game (and think it deserves support).

Btw, this post is not meant to address the morals involved when pirating software, I am looking at it from a simple business point of view. Whether people like it or not, it is a simple fact that there is no adequate protection of software possible at this time, and either as a business you accept this fact and try to generate as much revenue as possible from the customers that are willing to pay by serving them well, or you look for other means of control that work on for instance the server side of a game as MMO's do. With MMO's an significant and essential part of the game is not at the client side and thus cannot be cracked (easily).
June 24, 2008 5:50:00 PM

I have never believed that DRM does anything to prevent piracy. Some game models do (MMOs) but a non MMO using an MMO style log in system would not do as well because it would feel so arbitrary and forced.

DRM doesn't work. In fact it anti-works. it drives away potential sales. You would think developers would have figured this out by now.
June 26, 2008 3:03:55 AM

People just need to learn, Sony and all of it's products, are without flaw and you shouldn't question anything about them.

(I just thought the Sony crew needed some help.)
June 26, 2008 7:29:28 AM

infornography42 said:
I have never believed that DRM does anything to prevent piracy. Some game models do (MMOs) but a non MMO using an MMO style log in system would not do as well because it would feel so arbitrary and forced.


Well, given the current state of the net, it is very feasible to produce single player games with significant content on a server instead of the client. Of course there would be some people bitching about the fact that a single player game would require internet access and that they want to play it on the road (sure...) but if the requirement is clearly stated before buying, that would not be an issue for me. If that is how publishers want to protect their copyright then I have no problems with that whatsoever, as long as they are not going to charge me with an additional monthly fee.

Obviously it would require some significant investment on the publisher's side but it would be better spent than putting money in DRM for client side software that is not working. One may even argue that the fact that publishers are not yet moving in this direction that they do not believe themselves that it will increase their revenues significantly and therefore they are not loosing all that much revenue to piracy to begin with. I am an optimist so for now I'll just blame publishers for being slow to become fully internet minded. Apparently there's lots of money to be made by acting slowly, maybe it's the customers that are still accepting all the crap that's thrown at them, who are really slow.
June 28, 2008 9:01:35 PM

If things continue on their current trends we can expect more and more absurd DRM that still does nothing to stop the pirates and only further inconveniences the legitimate customers. I will quit this hobby before I cross the line I have drawn and I am not alone. Publishers may find they have successfully gutted their entire market base before they learn, but even then they may just blame piracy and leave the market themselves.
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