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UPS for ~400 watt Active-PCF PSU Tower Desktop

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March 14, 2013 1:50:47 PM

I'm trying to find the best value UPS for my desktop computer, at first I thought it would be a simple choice, but the more research I do the more I complicated it seems to get.

I haven't measured my exact energy usage, but using the online extreme power usage calculator I got 432w recommended and the actual PSU in my tower is an active-PFC Corsair 600w :
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817139028

I went to the APC website and using their product selector and I was about to buy this model off Amazon:
http://www.amazon.com/APC-BE750G-Saving-Battery-Back-UPS/dp/B000Z80ICM/qid=1363294098

But luckily I read the reviews and realized it wouldn't be compatible with my power supply.

I did read this post:
Pure Sinewave UPS for Active PFC Power Supplies!

And another one over here:
Active PFC Power Supply and NON true sine wave UPS

But the only suggestion seems to be buy a $200+ UPS.

Any suggestions? I'm hoping to spend under $100 as I just need a minimal solution that would allow me to shutdown my computer or put it into standby. I work in a shared space where the breakers get tripped every once in a while from other people overloading the circuits.

Thanks!

More about : ups 400 watt active pcf psu tower desktop

March 14, 2013 4:11:25 PM

The 432w recommendation you got was with the computer at 90% system load and 90% CPU TDP utilization which are default values already selected. What are you using the computer for ? If the computer isn't always at near max load then factoring in that much power draw shouldn't be necessary, if it it is then your going to have to obviously factor in that much and a little extra power to have as a buffer so the computer can have time to shut down. Because if you are drawing 430 watts and have a 450W UPS it will only remain on for a few seconds if it stays on at all. So again if it's just basic internet browsing with a few non intensive apps running where the computer isn't working much is when a smaller might work it just depends on how much run time you need.

As far as your budget you are going to have to stretch it out to accommodate a nicer unit in my opinion. When I was extensively researching to purchase a UPS I found Cyberpower PFC compatible units to be really good and affordable. I personally own the 1500VA/900w unit the LCD screen is neat with the information it displays along with the software that works great.

Here's a 850VA/510W unit
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=42-102-...
June 30, 2013 12:11:07 AM

jhsu8888,

You've probably already gotten a UPS by now...

Orlean has given you some xlnt general advice. As a matter of fact I purchased the same CyberPower 1500PFCLCD that he did. Like you I had been trying to get by for under a hundred bucks too... haha. But after shelling out another Franklin and a half, I'm sold on this bad boy...

I think the biggest worry about getting APFC compatible is that without it, the APFC PSU just might shut the computer off during the switch over from wall power to battery. Some may live thru it. Some not.

The 510W CyberPower CP850PFCLCD unit (with adaptive sinewave technology) is about $115 on Newegg & Amazon. I'm getting it for the computer I'm building with my son cuz it looks to be of similar pedigree to the one Orlean & I have. Looks like its little brother, haha

Read further if you want some of my experience with it.

I have an active PFC power supply (Corsair 1200AX) on my own computer. It's a dual-Xeon workstation with 2 large monitors, 8 hard drives, 3 SSDs, RAID card, high end GPU, BR drive, and lots of 200mm fans. The utility that comes with my UPS says my load is ~325 watts for average use and it projects about 18 minutes of run time on battery power.

In one year's time, my UPS has saved my system and some valuable video compositing projects from 3 power outages that included 2 nearby lightning strikes to neighborhood transformer with resultant surges. I was able to continue working on battery power for 15 minutes during one, and in all three situations I was provided the time to strategize, backup, upload to the net and whatever, before shutting everything down gracefully with no corruption. On one I didn't have to shutdown - the power came back on in time. And a couple of times battery power kicked in for a minute or so when wall power went brown. Now In the past, before I ever thought seriously about getting a UPS, I've experienced lightning strikes that totally corrupted files I was working on and rendered my boot drive useless until I did some low level repair on the boot sectors...
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July 1, 2013 10:37:13 AM

I actually still haven't gotten a UPS yet because I have moved my computer to a different location that has more stable power for now.

I might still get a UPS and I realize under $100 is too low. I saw the CyberPower 900w on Newegg for $200, which seems very reasonable.

Thanks for all the advice, definitely helps me feel more informed. Now I know what to get!
July 3, 2013 4:44:47 PM

Cool. Stability is a good thing.
Glad to help in some small way... I know I like to hear what people's experience has been, cuz it helps me put the reviews I read in perspective.
I just received the 510W CyberPower CP850PFCLCD today. It's not "Pure" sine wave, but "Adaptive" and supposed to be Active PFC compatible . And will start building my next build next week. If I find a problem with that particular UPS and my Active PFC Seasonic PSU I'll be sure to remember to post it here. And hopefully if it works great, I'll remember to post that too... haha
!