Asus Sabertooth Z77 performance mode cooler?

Hi,

I'm putting together a new computer, and my current selections are these:

Asus Sabertooth z77
Intel Core i5-3570k or Intel Core i7-3770k

I found the following in a review of the motherboard:
Quote:
Have no fear though, go into that magnificent ASUS BIOS and select performance mode. You'll instantly get an impressive performance boost at very little extra power consumption as the CPU will now be throttles to 4200 MHz. So that's a good tip right there.

http://www.guru3d.com/articles_pages/asus_sabertooth_z77_review,22.html

Quote:
The ASUS Sabertooth Z77 is equipped with more overclocking possibilities; you can easily do a quick jump to 4.2GHz speed by selecting the performance mode on the BIOS. That was an additional 700MHz on top of the 3.5GHz Core i7-3770K processor. The system runs smoothly will full stability.

http://bestmotherboardreview.com/blog/tag/asus-sabertooth-z77-review/

My question is now, what kind of cpu cooler will I need to ensure stability if i use this "auto overclock" feature? I'm by no means an overclocker, and don't plan on any manual OC'ing, but 700 mhz "for free" by flicking a switch seems decent if it will run smoothly without me doing anything extraordinary.. Bonus question: Will this also work with the i5-3570k? The article only mentions i7-3770k..

I was thinking about buying a Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO cooler, since its has a decent pricetag and doesn't obstruct the DIMM slots as far as I can tell.. Will this cooler be sufficient to ensure stability and decent temperature when performance mode is enabled?

What kind of temperature range should I be aiming for with these CPU's to avoid damaging the components?
6 answers Last reply
More about asus sabertooth z77 performance mode cooler
  1. if you are looking to stay in the price bracket of the 212 evo then go for the thermalright true spirit 120m http://www.overclockers.co.uk/showproduct.php?prodid=HS-098-TR its a better performer and still very well priced, you should aim to be keeping those cpu's below 80c when on load, they can go a bit higher but its just i like to err on the side of caution
  2. kiezz said:
    if you are looking to stay in the price bracket of the 212 evo then go for the thermalright true spirit 120m http://www.overclockers.co.uk/showproduct.php?prodid=HS-098-TR its a better performer and still very well priced, you should aim to be keeping those cpu's below 80c when on load, they can go a bit higher but its just i like to err on the side of caution


    Thank you, I'll have a look at it.. As I'm completely new to overclocking, I'm mostly worried about how much extra heat the CPU will produce (and consequently how large a cooler I need) to be on the safe side if I enable performance mode (i.e. 700 mhz auto-overclock) in the bios..
  3. You are really better off doing it manually it's really not that much harder that just "flipping a switch" - overclocking it automatically with OC tuner will change the BLCK setting which isn't really recommended and since you have a unlocked processor you are better of just doing it by the multiplier manually. In addition it will use a higher voltage than needed for the given clock speed generating more heat.

    As far as cooling with a mild overclock of 4.2 a good budget air cooler will do such as the 212 Evo.
  4. Orlean said:
    You are really better off doing it manually it's really not that much harder that just "flipping a switch" - overclocking it automatically with OC tuner will change the BLCK setting which isn't really recommended and since you have a unlocked processor you are better of just doing it by the multiplier manually. In addition it will use a higher voltage than needed for the given clock speed generating more heat.

    As far as cooling with a mild overclock of 4.2 a good budget air cooler will do such as the 212 Evo.


    Okay, could you elaborate a little on the difference? As I said I'm completely new, so I don't really understand the difference between doing it one way or the other? Whats the downside to doing it automagically (via the BLCK like you say) vs doing it by hand?
  5. Quote:
    As far as cooling with a mild overclock of 4.2 a good budget air cooler will do such as the 212 Evo.

    http://img32.imageshack.us/img32/3720/snipi.jpg Uploaded with ImageShack.us

    the benchmark was tested on an i5 3570k it shows the the temperature rise when put on load, the thermalright true spirit 120m is budget its only £25 and its a better performer than the 212 evo
  6. kiezz said:
    Quote:
    As far as cooling with a mild overclock of 4.2 a good budget air cooler will do such as the 212 Evo.

    http://img32.imageshack.us/img32/3720/snipi.jpg Uploaded with ImageShack.us

    the benchmark was tested on an i5 3570k it shows the the temperature rise when put on load, the thermalright true spirit 120m is budget its only £25 and its a better performer than the 212 evo


    Not implying that the Spirit 120m is a bad cooler there just both around the same price(True Spirit 120M is actually around $37(29 euro) here) with a performance that's pretty similar so you really can't go wrong with both it just all depends on which is easier to purchase depending on where you live so that would be up to Caion.


    Caion said:
    Orlean said:
    You are really better off doing it manually it's really not that much harder that just "flipping a switch" - overclocking it automatically with OC tuner will change the BLCK setting which isn't really recommended and since you have a unlocked processor you are better of just doing it by the multiplier manually. In addition it will use a higher voltage than needed for the given clock speed generating more heat.

    As far as cooling with a mild overclock of 4.2 a good budget air cooler will do such as the 212 Evo.


    Okay, could you elaborate a little on the difference? As I said I'm completely new, so I don't really understand the difference between doing it one way or the other? Whats the downside to doing it automagically (via the BLCK like you say) vs doing it by hand?


    Here's a video that uses the same UEFI Bios as the Sabertooth so you have a better visual, if you skip to 26.40ish they show you how you can go about overclocking via the BIOS actually the whole video is pretty informative but it's linked starting at 26.40. You will need to hit F7 (Advance mode) to see all the options come up for overclocking.

    http://youtu.be/4mkGQhE1o2w?t=26m39s

    As far as the difference, changing the BLCK puts more stress on other components also a way to overclock if you don't have a unlocked multiplier but since you have the "K" edition CPU you can just overclock via the Multiplier so for example your 3570k has a BLCK (base clock) of 100 with a multiplier of 34 so 100x34=3400mhz that's how you get your clock speed. So via the Bios you would overclock via Turbo Multiplier when you set it to manual a group of numbers will come up (you can see this in the video) if you want a 4.2ghz overclock you set the multiplier to 42 - if auto voltage is selected while overclocking the CPU will automatically adjust voltage but usually a high pretty high value is selected for the given clock speed causing more heat, so by doing it manually you can lower that voltage in increments until you find a stable voltage that works for that clock speed via either fixed voltage or offset voltage which is also covered in the video.
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