thermal issues with running multiple cores simultaneously

A few months ago I bought a high-end PC with a quad-core Xeon CPU.

I have used the PC to run long (12-24 hour) business-related jobs, that
typically keep 2/4 of the cores busy.

Since that time the PC has failed twice, apparently due to overheating.
This occurred in cold weather, with a room temperature of around 65-70.

Is it reasonable to assume that a Xeon-class workstation should be able to handle this type of load indefinitely?
6 answers Last reply
More about thermal issues running multiple cores simultaneously
  1. If your having issues with heat then you may want to try an aftermarket heatsink/fan. Also you do want to check the air flow inside the case to make sure that you have a good flow. Three or four fans would be a good number to have for air flow. You can try something like this one.

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835106150
  2. The system might be dusty too, dust it out with a can of compressed air.
  3. It's not load at all :), it's sounds more of a heat related issue.
    I run my workstation 24/7. Even after a few weeks I have to give it a good cleaning out.
    You'll collect a lot... a lot of dust. You may be surprised what you find when you break open the case.

    If it's a complete shutdown, like someone just pulled out the plug, the issue is heat or hardware related(PSU).
    Seeing as you run your computer at such long hours, i suspect heat, and to clean out the case and all the fans with compressed air. Make sure the hsf isn't full of dust, etc.

    I also have dogs, somehow finds its way into the case....
  4. biopolar said:
    It's not load at all :), it's sounds more of a heat related issue.
    I run my workstation 24/7. Even after a few weeks I have to give it a good cleaning out.
    You'll collect a lot... a lot of dust. You may be surprised what you find when you break open the case.

    If it's a complete shutdown, like someone just pulled out the plug, the issue is heat or hardware related(PSU).
    Seeing as you run your computer at such long hours, i suspect heat, and to clean out the case and all the fans with compressed air. Make sure the hsf isn't full of dust, etc.

    I also have dogs, somehow finds its way into the case....



    I've checked the dust angle, and it doesn't seem to be a problem, given that the PC is new.

    The failures are actually component failures like the motherboard, and not just temporary shutdowns.

    I assume that a workstation-type PC should be able to handle several cores running continually, and thus the problem is a design issue with cooling. What seems to be happening is that the PC runs too hot because of the load, and this leads to some type of accelerated component failure.

    The PC is a commercially-configured one, and not my own custom design.
  5. What does the case have for fans? Any computer that's going to be running for extended periods of time need good cooling and air circulation. As you mentioned with the Motherboard having issues there are several places on the motherboard that needs cooling , naturally the cpu is the first and most important but then you have the chipsets and the ram slots.
    Most computers have the standard front and rear fans but I also think that side and top fans can be very helpful with side fans being more so. One or two side fans gives you fresh cooler air being blown directly onto the motherboard area and a top fan will aid in removing warmer air that rises to the top of the case.
    The best option for running long periods of time is water cooling and with a properly configured system the water cooling will keep the temps at a normal level. My computer runs a min 12 hrs daily and can be on for 14 or 15 hrs on some days and it's completely water cooled. The video cards, the cpu , the ram and the motherboard chipsets are all water cooled and the temps are never high until a gaming session is being played and then the video cards temp go up a bit but never above 50c. However the one drawback with water cooling is the initial cost which can be high. So if that option is out due to cost then you have to make sure that oyu have enough fans to do the job and maybe look into a new heatsink/fan for the cpu.
  6. I know of Intel® Xeon™ dual processor based systems that have been running basically 24/7 for years. So if you are having heating issues I would start by looking at the case and the location of the server. If you are not getting good air flow through the case it can lead to heating issues.
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