1080 120hz led tv or 1080 120hz monitor

Im looking to purchase a new tv. I play alot of video games on my computer but hate sitting at the desk to do so would i get just as good picture quality from a 40" 1080 120hz led tv then i would from a 24" 1080 120hz monitor. I am going to be sitting 4-5 ft away from tv i am using 2 gtx 660ti's sli.thanks
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More about 1080 120hz led 1080 120hz monitor
  1. no not necessarily as it depends on the brand of TV you use some have better picture quality then others.. Also TVs usually have a higher input lag then monitors as I found out on purchasing a 55" lg 800hz 3D TV the response time on tvs cannot match monitors if you are a gamer a monitor would be better. Its your choice however have a bigger TV and bare the input lag would be my choice as I like to be comfortable and not be at a desk. For reference my TV has a average of 68ms response time vs my Lg 2ms
  2. has22fas said:
    no not necessarily as it depends on the brand of TV you use some have better picture quality then others.. Also TVs usually have a higher input lag then monitors as I found out on purchasing a 55" lg 800hz 3D TV the response time on tvs cannot match monitors if you are a gamer a monitor would be better. Its your choice however have a bigger TV and bare the input lag would be my choice as I like to be comfortable and not be at a desk. For reference my TV has a average of 68ms response time vs my Lg 2ms

    Yea i would be getting a 40" 120hz so i cannot imagin the lag being that bad
  3. try this one http://overlordcomputer.com/collections/displays/products/new-overlord-tempest-x270oc-grade-a
    I am using it at 115 Hz and 2560x1440, there is no problem with the display.
  4. killer226 said:
    try this one http://overlordcomputer.com/collections/displays/products/new-overlord-tempest-x270oc-grade-a
    I am using it at 115 Hz and 2560x1440, there is no problem with the display.

    It says item available mid may 2013?
  5. scottd9 said:
    has22fas said:
    no not necessarily as it depends on the brand of TV you use some have better picture quality then others.. Also TVs usually have a higher input lag then monitors as I found out on purchasing a 55" lg 800hz 3D TV the response time on tvs cannot match monitors if you are a gamer a monitor would be better. Its your choice however have a bigger TV and bare the input lag would be my choice as I like to be comfortable and not be at a desk. For reference my TV has a average of 68ms response time vs my Lg 2ms

    Yea i would be getting a 40" 120hz so i cannot imagin the lag being that bad


    120hz on TVs introduces input lag, and is 60hz input, 120hz displayed(frames added by the image processor), so you don't get all the benefits of 120hz

    120hz computer monitors are 120hz input 120hz display, and no additional input lag, you get all the benefits of 120hz.

    There will be input lag on the TV in gaming, for example if you're playing a FPS such as Modern Warfare 3 when you shoot their will be a slight delay also movement
  6. ^+1

    Don't get a 120hz TV for gaming. Until HDMI 1.4b is used, TV's don't accept 120hz of input.
  7. scottd9 said:
    killer226 said:
    try this one http://overlordcomputer.com/collections/displays/products/new-overlord-tempest-x270oc-grade-a
    I am using it at 115 Hz and 2560x1440, there is no problem with the display.

    It says item available mid may 2013?


    It is the only option of cheap and quality 120Hz gaming out there, I had to wait for 2 months to get this and worth every penny.
  8. I've seen people with the catleaps at 100+hz say they preferred their Samsung 120hz TN display. I'm curious how the poor response time of IPS monitors affect the display at 120 FPS. It seems it would cause blurring to a point you lose clarity of those FPS.

    It doesn't matter to me anyways. I'm not going away from a 3D Vision monitor to try it. 3D is too awesome.
  9. bystander said:
    I've seen people with the catleaps at 100+hz say they preferred their Samsung 120hz TN display. I'm curious how the poor response time of IPS monitors affect the display at 120 FPS. It seems it would cause blurring to a point you lose clarity of those FPS.

    It doesn't matter to me anyways. I'm not going away from a 3D Vision monitor to try it. 3D is too awesome.

    the question is how much money can you invest on a monitor.
  10. killer226 said:
    scottd9 said:
    killer226 said:
    try this one http://overlordcomputer.com/collections/displays/products/new-overlord-tempest-x270oc-grade-a
    I am using it at 115 Hz and 2560x1440, there is no problem with the display.

    It says item available mid may 2013?


    It is the only option of cheap and quality 120Hz gaming out there, I had to wait for 2 months to get this and worth every penny.

    120Hz on a TV is postprocessing, not 120Hz input. It induces massive input lag which is no good for gaming, its not what you are after.
  11. That isn't a TV, it is real, but it is an IPS screen, which have poor response times. Poor response times cause ghosting, which some what neuter some of the advantages of 120hz.
  12. It's in response to him saying a TV is his only choice.
  13. Ah, I think you quoted the wrong person then.
  14. 120hz on a TV is different than 120hz on a monitor. 120hz on a monitor has the capability of refresh an image 120 times in a single second. 120hz TVs stretch what ever they are receiving to display it 120 times in a second. TV takes 24fps feed and breaks it into 120 frames and displays it. Monitor displays a feed the actual number of times it is sent up to 120 in a second.
  15. As stated by others a 120Hz HDTV is different from a 120Hz monitor.

    A 120Hz monitor requires a connection that can provide 60Hz + 60Hz input for monitor. That is done thru a dual-DVI connection, DisplayPort or HDMI 1.4a (correct me if I am wrong). The each 60Hz connection drives half the screen (half the resolution) which is why a 120Hz monitor can display up to 120 FPS; assuming the graphics card is powerful enough to pump out that many FPS.

    A 120Hz HDTV only has 60Hz inputs, therefore it can only receive at most 60 FPS from a graphics card even if the graphics card is powerful enough to pump out 150 FPS. 120Hz monitors does some video post processing; generically it is called video interpolation. This is basically to smooth out video playback of movies. If curious continue reading (or if you have trouble falling asleep...), otherwise you can stop here.


    The purpose of video interpolation is to reduce possible video stuttering that some people may see (which depends on how the brain processes the images sent to it via your eyes). In the US broadcast TV is basically recorded at 30 frames per second (29.97 to be a little more precise). 30 FPS divides into 60Hz evenly; each frame is displayed for 2Hz. The problem comes when watching a movie. Movies in the US are filmed at 24 FPS (23.976 to be more precise).

    24 frames does not divide evenly into 60Hz; 60 divided by 24 equals 2.5. That basically means 13 frames are displayed for 2Hz each and 11 frames are displayed for 3Hz (total is 59 frames). It is this difference in the display time that can cause video to stutter since some frames are display longer than others. Pumping up the output to 120Hz smooths out the video of movies and it does no harm to broadcast TV programs because 120Hz is evenly divided by 30 and 24.

    Video interpolation take two actual frames to create an interpolated 3rd frame and inserts it in between the two real frames this is great for movies because it makes everything playback smoothly. However, it is bad for games. The HDTV can perform this video interpolation very quickly, but it still takes a little bit of time to do so. This "time" is referred to a lag and can be an issue when playing fast paced games because it increases the time (by a tiny amount) it take for the actions on the mouse / keyboard / controller to be reflected on the screen. Kinda like you shot your gun and a half second later the bullet shoots out of the barrel of the gun.

    .
    .
    .

    Are you asleep yet?
  16. HDMI 1.4a does not support 120hz, but does support 3D @ 60hz through frame packing, a technique that does not work for 2D at 120hz. It is HDMI 1.4b that supports 120hz in 2D.
  17. Ahhhh, thanks.

    Yeah, I admit that I am not really up to date with HDMI specs.
  18. jaguarskx said:
    Ahhhh, thanks.

    Yeah, I admit that I am not really up to date with HDMI specs.

    I understand. You did ask to be corrected if wrong, so I thought I'd help you out and didn't want the OP to see an HDMI 1.4a TV and get it. Those aren't uncommon, but I'm not aware of any HDMI 1.4b TV's yet. That will open our options a lot if they ever show up.
  19. jaguarskx said:
    As stated by others a 120Hz HDTV is different from a 120Hz monitor.

    A 120Hz monitor requires a connection that can provide 60Hz + 60Hz input for monitor. That is done thru a dual-DVI connection, DisplayPort or HDMI 1.4a (correct me if I am wrong). The each 60Hz connection drives half the screen (half the resolution) which is why a 120Hz monitor can display up to 120 FPS; assuming the graphics card is powerful enough to pump out that many FPS.

    A 120Hz HDTV only has 60Hz inputs, therefore it can only receive at most 60 FPS from a graphics card even if the graphics card is powerful enough to pump out 150 FPS. 120Hz monitors does some video post processing; generically it is called video interpolation. This is basically to smooth out video playback of movies. If curious continue reading (or if you have trouble falling asleep...), otherwise you can stop here.


    The purpose of video interpolation is to reduce possible video stuttering that some people may see (which depends on how the brain processes the images sent to it via your eyes). In the US broadcast TV is basically recorded at 30 frames per second (29.97 to be a little more precise). 30 FPS divides into 60Hz evenly; each frame is displayed for 2Hz. The problem comes when watching a movie. Movies in the US are filmed at 24 FPS (23.976 to be more precise).

    24 frames does not divide evenly into 60Hz; 60 divided by 24 equals 2.5. That basically means 13 frames are displayed for 2Hz each and 11 frames are displayed for 3Hz (total is 59 frames). It is this difference in the display time that can cause video to stutter since some frames are display longer than others. Pumping up the output to 120Hz smooths out the video of movies and it does no harm to broadcast TV programs because 120Hz is evenly divided by 30 and 24.

    Video interpolation take two actual frames to create an interpolated 3rd frame and inserts it in between the two real frames this is great for movies because it makes everything playback smoothly. However, it is bad for games. The HDTV can perform this video interpolation very quickly, but it still takes a little bit of time to do so. This "time" is referred to a lag and can be an issue when playing fast paced games because it increases the time (by a tiny amount) it take for the actions on the mouse / keyboard / controller to be reflected on the screen. Kinda like you shot your gun and a half second later the bullet shoots out of the barrel of the gun.

    .
    .
    .

    Are you asleep yet?



    Almost, so if i want to hook up a 2560x1440 120hz monitor to my graphics card i can use a normal HDMI plug or does it need to be specific.
  20. Dual link DVI would be needed, assuming you can get a monitor at that spec.
  21. 120Hz output is limited to 1920x1080 resolution due to bandwidth limitations. I do not believe technology have advanced far enough for 2560x1440 @ 120Hz.
  22. jaguarskx said:
    120Hz output is limited to 1920x1080 resolution due to bandwidth limitations. I do not believe technology have advanced far enough for 2560x1440 @ 120Hz.


    That is not entirely true. There are several Korean, Japanese and even US IPS 1440p monitors that allow you to overclock them to 120hz. Most won't make it to 120hz, but some do.

    However, slow response times will make a lot of those extra frames blur together a bit.
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