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Stream browser content to Smart TV

Tags:
  • TV
  • Internet Explorer
  • Browsers
  • Wireless Networking
Last response: in Wireless Networking
April 9, 2013 6:03:53 AM

Hello all,

as far as you know, is it possible to watch on a Samsung TV (40es6710) the content from an Internet Explorer browser (installed on my desktop PC)?

The TV is connected to my PC through a wireless router (AllShare works ok, so I'm able to see videos and photos written on my disk).

The problem is like this, actually: the TV has its own browser, but the tv channel I want to watch is supportd just by Internet Explorer (big crap, I know), and I prefer to watch it on my TV, not on my PC monitor - not sure this is possible....

Thanks in advance!

More about : stream browser content smart

April 9, 2013 1:19:59 PM

Not really you pretty much need a monitor cable from your PC to the TV. They do make HDMI over IP extenders. You would need a gigabit enabled network. You would hook one box to your PC video out and then hook it to a ethernet cable going to your router/switch. You would then run another cable from your switch to second box. This second box would then connect to your tv via HDMI. Highly unlikley you can get this to work on wireless, it is pushing the limits of the gig port as it is.

But if you can run cables between the units and a router you could also likely just run a HDMI cable in the first place.
April 10, 2013 2:55:59 PM

Although I haven't tried it myself, I bet you actually could do it. But I have serious concerns regarding the quality of the experience.

You could use VLC to stream your desktop to the smart TV, or any other device capable of decoding that stream. VLC is extremely flexible and powerful, and will stream just about anything, be it files, a tv tuner, or even your desktop. But while technically possible, bandwidth limits would probably make it impractical. It's the same problem you'd have trying to watch a video over remote desktop. Ever try to watch a video over RDP? Painful, even if both ends of the connection are local. There's just no substitute for either streaming the raw data, or hooking up the desktop/laptop directly to the TV.

If your TV supports DLNA, you might be able to install and access a Plex server (or numerous others media servers) that perhaps has a plug-in for that particular service. For example, my smart TV doesn't give me access to TWIT, but my Plex server has a TWIT plug-in, and supports the Plex server over DLNA. So now I have access to TWIT on the TV!