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Intel HD graphics and Discrete GPUs

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April 9, 2013 9:15:55 AM

Is intel HD graphics a waste of transistors for gamers who own a discrete GPU? What do you think? Is there a way to use them both? If you know about such motherboards list them out. Only serious answers needed.
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April 9, 2013 10:15:54 AM

No. Transistor for transistor, they're still very cheap. And since so many CPUs nowadays have integrated GPUs it's probably not worth worrying about how much more expensive they will be.

A major point to consider though is AMD's HSA and Intel's Pixel Sync/Quick Sync/ect that allow for the iGPU to be used as a co-processor. Just look at the new consoles with this rhetorical question: Why would it benefit from having an integrated GPU if there is already dedicated GPU?
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a c 188 à CPUs
April 9, 2013 10:30:18 AM

While I don't plan to use our Intel® HD graphics when game that doesnt mean they are a waste. There are some advantages to having the IGP (integrated graphic on processor). The Intel Quick Sync which is built into the IGP can help with digital encoding. Also if you are trying to troubleshoot issues with your system it is easy to take out the video card and narrow down possible places of problems. In the end while gamers may want top of the line graphics when gaming that doesnt mean that they need those graphics all the time. Here is some additional information on what our IGP can do http://software.intel.com/en-us/articles/quick-referenc...
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April 9, 2013 11:12:51 AM

IntelEnthusiast said:
While I don't plan to use our Intel® HD graphics when game that doesnt mean they are a waste. There are some advantages to having the IGP (integrated graphic on processor). The Intel Quick Sync which is built into the IGP can help with digital encoding. Also if you are trying to troubleshoot issues with your system it is easy to take out the video card and narrow down possible places of problems. In the end while gamers may want top of the line graphics when gaming that doesnt mean that they need those graphics all the time. Here is some additional information on what our IGP can do http://software.intel.com/en-us/articles/quick-referenc...


Does that means intel's quick sync and other IGP related features still work on a system with a discrete GPU? If yes, then its not a con. Thanks for the help.


a b à CPUs
April 9, 2013 11:51:11 AM

Quick sync doesn't work with a discrete graphics card, only HD graphics. They do offer models like the 3350p with out the HD graphics, although they are still on the chip, they are just disabled I believe.

Personally I think they should offer at least a 3570k and 3770k without HD graphics even physically on the chip, and for a cheaper price. Like 50 bucks off. I know the HD graphics cost at least a quarter of what they are selling these chips for. And for people who don't use quick sync, like myself, why should we have to waste money on the HD graphics. Your chip will probably even draw less power.

I have my HD graphics disabled through the BIOS. So I don't think I'm benefiting from any of what HD graphics has to offer. There's also plenty of programs that offer acceleration through your discrete graphics card too.

So although I don't have a big problem with HD 4000 graphics being on these chips, I don't see why you HAVE to get a feature you don't want or need. I think it's a waste of money for people like me, who only really care about gaming performance, overclocking, benchmarks, and nothing else.

And if they did offer such a chip, I bet hardly anyone would ever buy a regular 3570k or 3770k again. Because they can save money and actually get what they want and what they pay for. Because most people disable the HD graphics anyways, its just a shame they had to pay for it. I also think it's a shame that the new 4770k and 4670k only come with GT2 graphics and not GT3. Instead of giving us something we could actually game on, they give us something that we'll never, ever use. How the hell does that make sense? And we have to pay for that crap.
April 9, 2013 1:32:00 PM

ericjohn004 said:
Quick sync doesn't work with a discrete graphics card, only HD graphics. They do offer models like the 3350p with out the HD graphics, although they are still on the chip, they are just disabled I believe.

Personally I think they should offer at least a 3570k and 3770k without HD graphics even physically on the chip, and for a cheaper price. Like 50 bucks off. I know the HD graphics cost at least a quarter of what they are selling these chips for. And for people who don't use quick sync, like myself, why should we have to waste money on the HD graphics. Your chip will probably even draw less power.

I have my HD graphics disabled through the BIOS. So I don't think I'm benefiting from any of what HD graphics has to offer. There's also plenty of programs that offer acceleration through your discrete graphics card too.

So although I don't have a big problem with HD 4000 graphics being on these chips, I don't see why you HAVE to get a feature you don't want or need. I think it's a waste of money for people like me, who only really care about gaming performance, overclocking, benchmarks, and nothing else.

And if they did offer such a chip, I bet hardly anyone would ever buy a regular 3570k or 3770k again. Because they can save money and actually get what they want and what they pay for. Because most people disable the HD graphics anyways, its just a shame they had to pay for it. I also think it's a shame that the new 4770k and 4670k only come with GT2 graphics and not GT3. Instead of giving us something we could actually game on, they give us something that we'll never, ever use. How the hell does that make sense? And we have to pay for that crap.


Yes, if we dont use it we dont need it. And extra transistors generate more heat and thus might limit turbo boost. Intel should have been wise and released the same chip without intel hd graphics. They did it on some of the xeon e3 v2 chips but they cant be overclocked. If our dedicated graphics card can do everything that an intel hd graphics does why pay for it twice? Switchable graphics can solve the problem in desktops.
a c 210 à CPUs
April 9, 2013 1:45:53 PM

Intel HD graphics are rubbish compared to what AMD's APUs are capable of...when I was playing sports years ago in college, we would call that contest a "boat race" (the equivalent in a baseball game of winning 20 to 1)...

Plus, at least AMD has the good sense to not put their iGPU on their high end CPUs aimed squarely at gaming. Personally I think it's a jab by intel to try to say they sell more integrated graphics then anyone...when the truth is likely fewer than 20% of all people who purchase such a product ever intend to use them.

How on earth would anyone pay $300 for the i7-3770k and then use onboard graphics? I mean, what were they smoking when they thought that idea up?
May 10, 2013 11:19:07 AM

lucid virtu mvp

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May 10, 2013 11:36:11 AM

8350rocks said:
Intel HD graphics are rubbish compared to what AMD's APUs are capable of...when I was playing sports years ago in college, we would call that contest a "boat race" (the equivalent in a baseball game of winning 20 to 1)...

Plus, at least AMD has the good sense to not put their iGPU on their high end CPUs aimed squarely at gaming. Personally I think it's a jab by intel to try to say they sell more integrated graphics then anyone...when the truth is likely fewer than 20% of all people who purchase such a product ever intend to use them.

How on earth would anyone pay $300 for the i7-3770k and then use onboard graphics? I mean, what were they smoking when they thought that idea up?


IGP comes in handy when troubleshooting your dedicated card, or if your card dies.
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