Need to build a monster computer for about $2700 and lower

Hello,

I am a young computer animator/graphics maker. Here is a rundown of programs I use:

Adobe After Effects, Illustrator, and Photoshop (full version of each)
Zbrush
Syflex
Final Cut Pro
ffmpeg
Maya (full version)
kaspersky viral protection


I also intend to use a drawing tablet and wifi would be a big plus. Monitors I do not intend to expend lots of money upon as I would like to buy a dual display I usually make a lot of hi resolution models, so these programs are a must and have to be able to go toe to toe with, say, the best a BOXX tech can build and can last a long time. What I need is basically a monster, POWERFUL computer I can build and overclock to the max without setting the house on fire or nuking the machine and I need to build it on the cheap. I am looking to buy from newegg and amazon, but am open to suggestions. I like lots of memory, a powerful chip, and a powerful graphics card/cpu (I prefer Nvidia and intel and need to anticipate what they are coming up with next). I really could use some advice as I normally I work the software end and not the hardware end of the beastie. I tried asking for advice and help at the Tonyxmac forum but I asked something the forum did not like and stepped on a toe or two by accident. If anybody can guide me through the process and tell me what to buy, I would be truly grateful. I need all the help I can get! (ps-I am open to using windows.)
21 answers Last reply
More about build monster computer 2700 lower
  1. This should be what you are looking for, switch the i5 3570k into a i7 3770k as well as switching the 7970s into 670s and you should be good to go, it will be about $50 more than the original price of this.

    CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($189.99 @ Microcenter)
    CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D14 65.0 CFM CPU Cooler ($81.99 @ Newegg)
    Motherboard: Asus P8Z77-V LE PLUS ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($124.99 @ Newegg)
    Memory: Corsair Vengeance 16GB (4 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($114.99 @ Amazon)
    Storage: Samsung 840 Series 250GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($162.99 @ NCIX US)
    Storage: Western Digital Caviar Black 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($149.99 @ NCIX US)
    Video Card: Gigabyte Radeon HD 7970 3GB Video Card (2-Way CrossFire) ($389.99 @ NCIX US)
    Video Card: Gigabyte Radeon HD 7970 3GB Video Card (2-Way CrossFire) ($389.99 @ NCIX US)
    Wireless Network Adapter: TP-Link TL-WDN4800 802.11a/b/g/n PCI-Express x1 Wi-Fi Adapter ($39.99 @ Amazon)
    Case: Rosewill THOR V2-W ATX Full Tower Case ($132.53 @ Amazon)
    Power Supply: Antec High Current Gamer 900W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($129.99 @ Amazon)
    Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($19.96 @ Amazon)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.98 @ Outlet PC)
    Monitor: Asus VH236H 23.0" Monitor ($157.58 @ Newegg)
    Monitor: Asus VH236H 23.0" Monitor ($157.58 @ Newegg)
    Monitor: Asus VH236H 23.0" Monitor ($157.58 @ Newegg)
    Total: $2490.11
  2. burritobob said:
    This should be what you are looking for, switch the i5 3570k into a i7 3770k as well as switching the 7970s into 670s and you should be good to go, it will be about $50 more than the original price of this.

    CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($189.99 @ Microcenter)
    CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D14 65.0 CFM CPU Cooler ($81.99 @ Newegg)
    Motherboard: Asus P8Z77-V LE PLUS ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($124.99 @ Newegg)
    Memory: Corsair Vengeance 16GB (4 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($114.99 @ Amazon)
    Storage: Samsung 840 Series 250GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($162.99 @ NCIX US)
    Storage: Western Digital Caviar Black 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($149.99 @ NCIX US)
    Video Card: Gigabyte Radeon HD 7970 3GB Video Card (2-Way CrossFire) ($389.99 @ NCIX US)
    Video Card: Gigabyte Radeon HD 7970 3GB Video Card (2-Way CrossFire) ($389.99 @ NCIX US)
    Wireless Network Adapter: TP-Link TL-WDN4800 802.11a/b/g/n PCI-Express x1 Wi-Fi Adapter ($39.99 @ Amazon)
    Case: Rosewill THOR V2-W ATX Full Tower Case ($132.53 @ Amazon)
    Power Supply: Antec High Current Gamer 900W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($129.99 @ Amazon)
    Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($19.96 @ Amazon)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.98 @ Outlet PC)
    Monitor: Asus VH236H 23.0" Monitor ($157.58 @ Newegg)
    Monitor: Asus VH236H 23.0" Monitor ($157.58 @ Newegg)
    Monitor: Asus VH236H 23.0" Monitor ($157.58 @ Newegg)
    Total: $2490.11


    This sounds lovely, but can I ask a question-what would happen if I kicked it up a notch to a Xeon and went for 32 GB rather than 16? How much a difference are we talking here? I also intend to have some nice burning capacity/upgradeabilty, since the last time I bought a machine it cost me 4 thousand and I could not upgrade the damn thing for love or money.
  3. krthush said:
    hmm its a good thing you questioned that build on Xeons, he's built a typical 3k gaming PC, not an animation PC >.>

    Gimme a sec, let me think up a few parts


    I am waiting on pins and needles!! Saw your site-this sounds like a man who knows what he is doing :)
  4. krthush said:
    sry to keep you waiting, xeon's is a whole new ball game XDD i felt that it would be worth getting xeons if you could get two of them, unfortunately it was too much for your build :S.


    WTF, just go for it. xeons are more likely to withstand whatever else is coming down the pike.
  5. krthush said:
    hmm i shall be more specific on some key points!!! (I shall mainly cover key points, so might forget minor things like "which case looks better")
    ok..

    All the time, I've assumed you won't be intensely gaming, but more rendering, working with 3D, e.t.c..

    Xeon's would be worth getting if: you plan on upgrading soon (spending money to add the second processor on), but!! it will be hard to build -> the mobo's are massive, expensive, and general hard to work with.

    So I went for a compromise got the i7 3930K, and so that's why i'm saying it would be worth getting an i7 3970X if you have a few bucks spare.

    It's a very good idea to get a QUADRO series Nvidia processor, as they specialize in work station graphics for rendering, 3D, e.t.c
    (again with a few bucks spare maybe get a K4000

    As you said you may want 32gb or even 64gb (RAM shall come be very useful when it comes to rendering), and rightly so, I would also try to find some high speed memory, maybe 2400mhz greater memory.

    I might have rushed the build I edited slightly -> its 2 am here, i'm very tired XDD, i shall further improve on it over the following few days.

    Hope I helped, and ty for checking my website out :D, glad you liked it!


    Thank you! And please, do not forget me-I am a woman in need of real help building. I love NVIDIA. I love the idea of building my very own workstation for rendering, modeling, creating my own animations (gaming figures into the picture almost nil: I have an Xbox for that.) In fact, if you know anybody who knows how to build an artist tablet, I am all ears on that-this is one chick who is sick and tired of Apple, Dell, BOXX, and HP ripping her off!
  6. This build above is fine, here is how to save some money.

    Get a Noctua D-14 its cheaper/better than the h110

    Rampage IV is a waste, why would you even bother, a simply 2011 socket is fine like the Asrock extreme6

    A single 2TB drive is cheaper than the 2x1TB drives...

    Fractal Design cases are overpriced sticking to a CM HAF 912 or Corsair 300r is more than enough.

    Platinum certified is a waste, you can stick with a simple 650w psu from Antec Corsair XFX or seasonic and you will be good to go.

    Overpriced 24" monitor I've seen some go for $140 that are the same in a nutshell.

    Quadros are not really that great in terms of workstation graphics + that one is not even certified by the softwares he plans to use stick to the software provided list for GPUs.
  7. krthush said:
    http://www.nvidia.co.uk/object/quadro-workstation-graphics-uk.html
    http://www.xbitlabs.com/articles/graphics/display/nvidia-quadro-k5000.html

    From reading around a lot of this, I'd assume quadro's shall be more useful for her than normal gaming GPUs

    Maybe your right about the cases, I was aiming for a sleek, minimalism case but quite large case. I didn't think most artist's would be into cases like the CM HAF.

    I believe one of her main requirements was that she be able to easily upgrade the system (quote "I prefer Nvidia and intel and need to anticipate what they are coming up with next"). So I chose a large case, yes.

    For the same reason I chose the Asus Rampage IV Extreme, arguably the best x79 mobo, it will give her tons of options when it comes to upgrading, i.e. she won't be limited by the Mobo.

    In what way Noctua better (cheaper yes, but she would want the easiest cooling solution, for max potential for overclocking that cpu);

    http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/h100i-elc240-seidon-240m-lq320,3380-12.html
    http://www.guru3d.com/articles_pages/corsair_h110_review,10.html
    http://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/Corsair/H110/6.html

    These seem pretty conclusive to me.

    On 2TB, yes the drive on its own might be cheaper by a little, but personally I would like to RAID 0, 2 1TB drives. But to be fair, I don't actually know about her storage needs, so that's why I'm waiting for a reply on that.

    About the monitor check this out (she is an graphic's designer, colour matters XDD, I'd like to be buying a he $600 or greater monitor but budget limits :D ).

    http://www.squidoo.com/graphic-design-monitor
    http://www.pcpro.co.uk/reviews/monitors/375823/dell-ultrasharp-u2412m
    http://reviews.cnet.com/lcd-monitors/dell-ultrasharp-u2412m/4505-3174_7-35002356.html

    I'd like that PSU to run her for the rest of her PC's life, so that's why I was choosing a platinum PSU; won't break the electrical bills + a god brand like seasonic ain't gonna die on her :) .


    The quadro you specifically selected has terrible performance in programs like such you should look to a different one as that one simply will not cut it. The nvidia website is obviously biased...

    Again 300r is a "sleek" option that is the same price as the HAF I stand by corsair on this one for making it a great value case. And if the 300r can fit a 690/7990 (as it has in the past) cards do not get larger, they get smaller there is still plenty of room for expansion. Also the fact that the scout is smaller than both the cases I suggested should be a reason why you have to go with either of my suggestions.

    IV extreme may be one of the "best" but you simply do not gain any performance. You are wasting ALL of those PCI-e slots as well as most of the RAM slots. Don't say SLI or whatever because literally 0 of those pieces of software listed support SLI technology. The extreme6 is not a limiter it is simply the BEST VALUE that you can get. You throw out your money otherwise. IE it will save you money and still will not be limiting in any way shape or form. The 2011 socket will die before you are limited by the extreme6.

    Installing a CPU cooler is not hard... it maybe takes 3 more minutes for a better quieter overclock compared to the H100i. Also there have been known leak problems with those coolers. That should scare anyone away form using them. Ask any commoner on these forums, closed loop cooling is simply put: terrible.

    Again platinum is worthless there is literally a 6% difference in the amount of power lost between 80plus and 80plus platinum, in the long run the 80plus will still be a better option, you will have saved more money by getting the 80plus than you will from getting the 80plus platinum in 6 years when this thing becomes "old".

    So you should save yourself some money and take the suggestions I have put in place. I have the PC Building veterans badge for a reason don't you know?

    Also on the monitor part of this it really comes down to personal preference... whatever your eyes like better you should pick not what a reviewers eyes. Buying a monitor in person is critical, or at least getting a real life visual and then getting it for a deal online.
  8. Again you leave a bunch of critiques of your current build uncontested, I really do not have to go there.

    Read actual reviews not from people whos paychecks come from these companies T.T leaks are common with those closed loop coolers.

    Also if you do read the news (which I hope you do) AMD card acceleration is coming to the Adobe line of products (and also it is already on just about every one of the other programs)... and again all I say is the quadro you have selected is not one of the best you should be looking to a different one, a certified one, those tend to have the best performance... I know workstations I was selected for best configs workstation last time... Also in a couple of your articles I saw this: For some years, AMD’s FireGLs and FirePros have noticeably undercut Nvidia’s products on price. The FirePro V7900 goes head-to-head with Nvidia’s Quadro 4000, yet costs at least £100 less. It sports 1,280 Stream processors, 2GB of GDDR5, and a bandwidth of 160GB/sec – which is more than any current Nvidia Quadro model. This gives it some impressive performance results, making it a very tempting competitor to Nvidia’s high-end offerings. Simple facts that the FireGL is cheaper but better... read your own "research" next time

    Oh and spamming links does not really give you any warranted argument. 99.99% of benchmarks show the Noctua D-14 is quieter and can overclock better than the H100i/H110... If you can spend less for more that is the best course of action.

    I really do not have to cite sources when I spit out facts.
  9. The whole point of what I'm trying to say is why spend WAY more money than needs to be spent, something half that price will PERFORM THE EXACT SAME, with the same power and everything that is promised, it's a premium that doesn't need to be spent.
  10. Hi fellas,


    A few details to provide here:


    Much of the Adobe suite shall count as part of a pipeline. I use photoshop for texturing, illustrator for its ability to create mattes and (sometimes) a few nifty tricks with the lines translating into 3d objects, Zbrush for modeling (I also sometimes use Mudbox) and Maya to set up environments, animation, and some lighting/texturing, ie, putting it all together. Maya also would have a plugin called shave and a haircut which I use for hair. Final cut and adobe after effects is to output it into TGA sequence and ultimately for film. They have to be harmoniously used and also I can be in situations where half of them are open on the desktop, so normally what I do is I have a dual display using two cheaper monitors (despite popular belief I can skimp here.) Something like this should be fine:

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16824005388

    The screens are large, the price is small, and its resolution is workable. Not the best resolution, but not the worst either. I cannot spend too much here because come Xmas I would like to buy at long last a graphics tablet, and if any of you fellas have any suggestions on where to get a big one for less than what Wacom charges, I am all ears. (No seriously....$600-$1000 for a tablet? Grrr.....)

    And BTW, krthush is right: I heart NVIDIA mainly because in my experience of it, they are near crash proof. And every year they get invitied to SIGGRAPH. AMD never does.

    I shall be in touch, boys. Once I get all the stuff lugged to my house, I am going to need instructions on putting it together so I do not wind up having to do weird stuff like "jiggle the door on the DVD drive" to get the thing to boot owing to installation errors.
  11. Mary Katherine Goode,

    Something that's been touched on in the many replies in this thread is the difference between a high performance gaming computer and a workstation. There is a factor of the CPU,single and double precision, high- 128X- anti-aliasing factors, 10-bit color, and other features. The gaming computer emphasizes higher frame rates in games as against accuracy and quality in image creation where each frame is completely finished. There is also the question of reliability and error-free calculation.The tools to create games are different from the tools to play them.

    There is a reason for Xeons and Quadros as I discovered when I tried a GeForce GTX 285 for AutoCad, Revit, Solidworks, Adobe CS4, Sketchup, and etc- it did certain things well- blocking out and small files, but when the files were large and the quality had to be very high, it would work on a rendering for 20 minutes and crash, had strange shadow artifacts, crashed Sketchup, would not open Solidworks viewports- which are very important in creating the detailed drawings. Doesn't Maya use multiple viewports? I changed the GTX for a Quadro FX 4800 and using the specialized drivers that are part of the increased costs, my problems faded away also. Again, I'm not certain of all the interactions at work- probably the configuration of the drivers, but I am certain that work became less hit and miss!

    The following is an alternative to a gaming directed computer, just for your consideration.

    This uses a Xeon E5-1650 6-core @ 3.2 / 3.8 GHZ which is No. 15 on the Passmark benchmarks>

    http://www.cpubenchmark.net/cpu_list.php

    It's important to note that Xeons can't be overclocked and this is to provide ultra-stability. And, in your use, the sheer clock speed is deceptive experientially. An 8-core AMD FX 8350 at 4.2GHz will not run Maya as fast as a 6-core Xeon at 2.6GHz. If you look into the calculation performance, you will find that Xeons are the highest rated. It's surprising, but if put these in order of benchmarks, of the top 20 benchmarked CPU's, 16 are Xeons, Nos. 1 through 7 and Xeons comprise 8 of the top 10. I don't understand the way the balance is achieved, but Xeons seem to emphasize high performance in certain calculation performances, whereas i7's are differently set up. On Passmark Perfromance Test, the highest performing E5-1650 / Quadro (4000) machine has a rating of 4246 with 2D / 3D scores of 781 / 1958. This is a Dell Precision T3600 and the CPU score is almost 25% under the top E5-1650 computer, so it can do much better. The highest rated E5-1650 computer that one uses a GTX660 and X79 motherboard for a rating of 5570 and 2D/3D of 886 / 4099. At a bit under $600, this is one of the few Xeons that seems to be realistically priced. There are 10-core Xeons used in 8-CPU configuration that cost $4,600 ,..

    For the graphics card, the suggestion here is to use the recently released Quadro K4000, which produces fantastic numbers in both 2D and 3D on Passmark Performance Test. An i7-3770K /K4000 machine has an overall rating of 5080 with 2D/3D scores of 1043 / 2924. For comparison, my 2X Xeon X5460/ Quadro FX 4800 (1.5GB) makes a rating of 1909 with 2D/3D scores of 521 / 924. You can see in this example that the K4000 is to the FX 4800 more or less 2X in 2D and 3X in 3D. In the past few years, Quadros have moved from 2D towards stronger 3D emphasis. The 3GB memory of the K4000 should also be more appropriate to large Maya files and you may find you never need more, whereas the K2000 might be stretched a bit. Still, the K2000 is very good -the top K2000 computer is i7-3930K based with rating of 4579 with 2D/3D of 911/1684.

    An important aspect of the world of Quadros are the specialized drivers made for certain applications. One reason I chose the Quadro FX 4800 is that there are specialized drivers for the most demanding applications I use, the AutoCad 2007, CS4 MC, and Solidworks x64 (2010) and that is true of the current Quadros and versions of that software. There was a version of the FX 4800 called the CX that was optimized specifically for CS4. Autodesk does certify the K4000 for Maya and has a partnered specialized driver for it. This trend is increasing as Adobe is now moving into GPU accelerated applications that can take advantage of GPU coprocessing- in my view the Personal Supercomputer future of workstations >

    http://www.nvidia.com/object/gpu-accelerated-applications.html

    Here's a Xeon / Quadro system suggestion >

    Animation, Editing, Imaging Workstation 4.13.13

    1. Intel Xeon E5-1650 Sandy Bridge-EP 3.2GHz (3.8GHz Turbo Boost) LGA 2011 130W Six-Core Server Processor $586.99

    2. Noctua NH-D14 120mm & 140mm SSO CPU Cooler $81.99

    3. SUPERMICRO X9SRA Single Socket R (LGA 2011) E5 ATX Workstation/Server Motherboard $290.00

    4. Kingston 16GB (4 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 ECC Unbuffered Server Memory w/TS Intel Model KVR16E11K4/16I $161.00
    a. Latency = 11
    b. Given your animation, video editing, and probable multiple simultaneous application use, I wish this amount were 32GB.

    5. SAMSUNG 840 Pro Series MZ-7PD128BW 2.5" 250GB SATA III MLC Internal Solid State Drive (SSD) $165.00
    a. OS and Applications

    6. Western Digital WD Black WD2002FAEX 2TB 7200 RPM SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive -Bare Drive $165.

    7. NVIDIA® Quadro® K4000 VCQK4000-PB 3GB GDDR5 PCI Express 2.0 x16 Workstation Video Card $800.

    8. ASUS DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS Black SATA 24X DVD Burner - Bulk - OEM $20

    9. LIAN LI PC-A75 Black Aluminum ATX Full Tower Computer Case $182.

    10. SeaSonic M12II 750 SS-750AM 750W ATX12V / EPS12V SLI Ready 80 PLUS BRONZE Certified Modular Active PFC Semi-modular Power Supply $100.00

    11. Microsoft Windows 7 Professional SP1 64-bit - OEM $140.00

    Subtotal: $2,692.

    This is of course, over your budget as it does not include a monitor. In my view, the monitor choice is as critical as any other component, more so when the results need to free of color and optical aberrations such that the content produced will never appear anywhere else in the same way. I had a 22" CRT NEC monitor that very gradually lost red and I did a project that produced hundreds of images that would be beet red on another computer or when printed. For my 3D CAD use now, I'm am very happy with an HP 27" 2711x @ 1920 X 1080 but if I did it again- I would have a 27" 2560 X 1440 monitor. As in the case of the K4000, a 2560 X 1440 monitor would be a stretch to the budget, but given the resolution, color accuracy, and text and detail display quality necessary, it would be worth having a look. When I saw these monitors- the Samsung and Viewsonic, I was suddenly disappointed in the HP- it seemed somewhat crude and lifeless with grainy text- the pixels seem huge! I am easily spoiled by high quality.

    Monitors are a component that any workstation user really should see in person- it seems impossible to gauge online or from reviews. The general quality, aspects of position adjustment, screen reflectivity, and importantly, the level and operation of controls varies considerably and is absolutely critical for the kind of work the proposed computer would be handling. The screen coating is very important as there are those that complain of some Dell Ultrasharps that they are "looking through pebbles" while certain other sizes Ultrasharps are fine The HP 2711x does not have a non-reflective coating and in my experience when positioned such that there is not a light source behind, it is much clearer and more immediate-looking. Monitors need to be seen working.

    On the subject of dual monitors, I would not presume to tell you your preference, but I have used CAD for 20 years on both single and dual monitors and I would choose a single, large monitor over dual monitor every time. When using dual monitors, the monitors are smaller and I found that I was quickly fatigued with zooming in and out, panning, scanning across side to side, and having to navigate the mouse miles back and forth every day between a viewport on one side and the menus on the other screen. I think the constant zooming and panning on a smaller monitor was especially tiring and work on dual monitors was definitely slower.

    So, suggestions out of the budget and not using dual monitors, but may well be worth consideration as a longer term use- if it could be used an extra two years without additional expenditure there is actually a substantial economy- for example not having to spend $1,000 on a new graphics card or upgraded CPU. Also, this might open discussions as to the important differences between high performance computers intended for gaming and for content creation.

    Cheers,

    BambiBoom

    [Dell Precision T5400 (2010)> 2X Xeon X5460 @3.16GHz, 16 GB DDR2-667, Quadro FX 4800 (1.5GB), WD RE4 / Segt Brcda > HP 2711x 1920 X 1080 monitor > Win 7 Ultimate 64 > AutoCad, Revit, Solidworks, Sketchup, CS4 MC, Corel Technical Designer, Wordperfect office, MS Office ]
  12. I know that's way over budget as well, but as we are finding out, if you want to go with Xeons you might have to bring up the bar a little bit.

    I completely agree with Bambi (its good to have some who knows what they are talking about), everything he said holds true.

    The one i just suggested is a slight adaption of his, I've included a better Xeon processor + mobo, so that you may in the future upgrade to having 2 Xeons = ACTUAL MONSTER.

    If you can't afford it, stick to bambi's build (there are a few things you can shave on his build if worst comes to worst...)
    And if you can't even afford bambi's build, guess we gonna have to stick to the i7's aren't we :(
  13. Currently I am waiting for all stars to align. I need to save up a few nickels to get the stuff and I hope to have the build up and running by late June. I thought I would get information now so I don't get lost later.
  14. krthush V2 said:
    Alright, I hope everything we have posted so far will help :D. Good Luck on your build anyays^^ I will try to keep this thread bumped if I find out any more info


    Please don't. Bumping is against forum rules and will result in you being banned. Please take the time to read the rules this time around.
  15. I know it has been a month, but the stars have aligned!! (Tooting horn, dancing, putting on a garishly colored cone shaped party hat) I am able to buy now the Xeon processor and have figured out that I can buy the computer I want in installments so that by September 5th I will have the machine I need. That being said, I wanted to ask if the build mentioned by krthush will be outdated by then or unworkable. Nobody is coming out with anything new this summer that will render this build obsolete? (Thought I should ask before going for it.) That being said, I wanted to ask about buying some parts from China or India, say, monitors. How do I go about this? I think it will knock down the price a bit, esp. if I buy from Taiwan.
  16. Mary Katherine Goode said:
    I know it has been a month, but the stars have aligned!! (Tooting horn, dancing, putting on a garishly colored cone shaped party hat) I am able to buy now the Xeon processor and have figured out that I can buy the computer I want in installments so that by September 5th I will have the machine I need. That being said, I wanted to ask if the build mentioned by krthush will be outdated by then or unworkable. Nobody is coming out with anything new this summer that will render this build obsolete? (Thought I should ask before going for it.) That being said, I wanted to ask about buying some parts from China or India, say, monitors. How do I go about this? I think it will knock down the price a bit, esp. if I buy from Taiwan.


    Mary Katherine Goode,

    Hey! Too rare > Goode news! > Unless your proposed system is going to use a Haswell processor (possible 10% improvement and with the possibility of a dis-incentive of new, under-developed 1150 motherboards) or a high end GTX (mostly changes of the number "6" to the number "7"), as far as I know, there are not significant technologies looming, worth the wait. I, for one, am waiting until Quadro K5000's are affordable used,..

    When you ask about buying parts from India/Asia, are you thinking of ordering directly from suppliers? My thought is that as I've been poking about a bit dreaming of a 27" 2560 X 1440, I've see quite a few new monitors- there are sub-$400 27" 2560 X 1440 listings on Ebay that are supplied from esp, South Korea and Taiwan. A couple of comments on monitors> 1> get the highest resolution possible and 2> if at all possible, see several choices in person. This is important, even if you have to call architectural and graphics design offices and ask if you can visit. From the mount adjustments, to screen reflectivity, to comprehensive, easy to use controls, color calibrations, to text display, no review can tell you if it's the best choice. When I bought a 27" 1980 X 1080 HP 2711X ($350) very much, read multiple reviews, saw them in the store, fiddled with controls and so on, but even with all my care, when I got it home, the stand wobbles at the slightest touch, I realized how I missed height adjustment ( it's elegantly set on two cardboard cat scratching blocks!), the presentation of text seems a bit weak, and all the dire warnings of the reflectivity of the screen in reviews were not applicable. Overall, I'm very happy, but then again, after all that care in shopping, two years later, I'm already looking around again,..

    That said, I'm not really certain how to comment more, as in reviewing the thread I can't see a list of the system components as proposed by our friend krthush. I must be missing something, as I can only see some individual suggestions- mostly concerning monitors. If you might post the final list of intended pieces, that will probably stimulate a lot more comment.

    Cheers,

    BambiBoom
  17. I don't think your needs justify server components. Since you are willing to overclock, you can get a lot of performance out of an i7-3770K. This build gives you a 27" 1440P IPS panel and a K4000 GPU.

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

    CPU: Intel Core i7-3770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($314.03 @ Amazon)
    CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D14 65.0 CFM CPU Cooler ($69.99 @ NCIX US)
    Motherboard: Asus P8Z77-V ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($174.99 @ Amazon)
    Memory: Corsair Vengeance LP 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($114.99 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Samsung 840 Pro Series 256GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($229.99 @ NCIX US)
    Storage: Seagate Barracuda 3TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($132.98 @ SuperBiiz)
    Video Card: PNY Quadro 4000 2GB Video Card ($703.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Case: Fractal Design Define R4 (Black Pearl) ATX Mid Tower Case ($99.99 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: SeaSonic 620W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($88.98 @ SuperBiiz)
    Optical Drive: LG WH14NS40 Blu-Ray/DVD/CD Writer ($59.99 @ Newegg)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Professional SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($134.98 @ Outlet PC)
    Monitor: Dell U2711 60Hz 27.0" Monitor ($599.00 @ Dell)
    Total: $2723.90
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-05-20 11:00 EDT-0400)
  18. Okay, here is the final build, which I have embarked upon already (bought a few of the smaller priced items) I hope I have not made any mistakes yet in what to purchase. Bare in mind, I am on a pay as I go basis with getting all this, so fear not if this thread progresses slowly. I am deeply appreciative of all the help I have received already, and wish to say THANK YOU.

    1)Intel Xeon E5-1650 Sandy Bridge-EP 3.2GHz (3.8GHz Turbo Boost) LGA 2011 130W Six-Core Server Processor $586.99 Have bought ONE. This shall be upgraded to two in the winter-stay tuned!

    2) Noctua NH-D14 120mm&140mm CPU cooler
    3) SUPERMICRO X9SRA Single Socket R (LGA 2011) E5 ATX Workstation/Server Motherboard $290.00 (Know I need to upgrade mobo-which one to get if I am going to get another Xeon?)

    4) Kingston 16GB (4 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 ECC Unbuffered Server Memory w/TS Intel Model KVR16E11K4/16I $161.00
    a. Latency = 11
    To be upgraded to 32 bit this winter. May get GPU as well, but L-A-T-E-R. Anybody know where any cheap Chinese knockoffs are to be bought? C'mon, Chinese companies like Lenovo must be chomping at the bit to make copies….

    5)SAMSUNG 840 Pro Series MZ-7PD128BW 2.5" 250GB SATA III MLC Internal Solid State Drive (SSD) $165.00
    a. OS and Applications

    6) Western Digital WD Black WD2002FAEX 2TB 7200 RPM SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive -Bare Drive $165.

    7) NVIDIA® Quadro® K4000 VCQK4000-PB 3GB GDDR5 PCI Express 2.0 x16 Workstation Video Card $800.

    8) ASUS DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS Black SATA 24X DVD Burner - Bulk - OEM $20

    9) LIAN LI PC-A75 Black Aluminum ATX Full Tower Computer Case $182.

    10) SeaSonic M12II 750 SS-750AM 750W ATX12V / EPS12V SLI Ready 80 PLUS BRONZE Certified Modular Active PFC Semi-modular Power Supply $100.00

    11) Microsoft Windows Professional (can get for FREE.)

    12) 2 Screens, glorious screens: ASUS VE278Q 27" Widescreen Full HD LED Monitor - 1080p, 1920x1080, 16:9, 10000000:1 Dynamic, 2ms, Integrated Speakers, DVI, VGA, HDMI $480 total
  19. What about amd worksation cards ?
    I dont know much about workstation hardware/software... But amd may perform better, just guessing
  20. Marcopolo123 said:
    What about amd worksation cards ?
    I dont know much about workstation hardware/software... But amd may perform better, just guessing



    Marcopolo123,

    I'm not knowledgeable of the current AMD Firepros, but in Passmark baselines they score very well>

    Quadro

    Top 2D > 1056, 932, 930, 824
    Top 3D > 3657, 2924, 2912, 2869
    High scoring Quadros > 2D > 4000, K4000, 600 3D > 6000, K4000, K5000

    Firepro

    Top 2D > 1179, 1119, 1037, 976
    Top 3D > 4318, 4316, 4290, 4263
    High Scoring Firepros > 2D> V7900, V4900, V5900 3D > W7000 , W8000

    However, the situation is complex as the Quadros are generally on high end Xeon 6 and 8 core CPU's, which runs at lower clock speeds, while the Firepros are on overclocked i7-3930K and i7-3770K. Also, Passmark is in my view weighted to favor parameters that make good gaming cards. Lastly, Quadros use CUDA and many applications of Aurtodesk, Dessault (Solidworks, Catia) and Adobe are CUDA optimized, such that the most common workstation applications do very well on Quadros and are also configured to sacrifice speed for image quality oriented. This makes comparisons from benchmarks difficult.

    The AMD numbers are impressive, but I don't know personally of any professional architectural, engineering, industrial design, CG animation or graphics design office using Firepros. There must be many, many and getting good results, but it seems NVIDIA has steered by their "partnered driver" programs and CUDA optimizations of the applications towards a strong Quadro dominance.

    So, yes, Firepros appear to be excellent performers, and are less expensive, but with workstation cards, one has to work back from the applications for which it will be used. For example, I use a two generation old Quadro FX 4800 (1.5GB) because I use Solidworks 2010 and Adobe CS4, and the FX 4800 was promoted as especially designed with those two- among others- in mind. There was a special variant of the FX 4800 (I've only read about them) called the "CX' specially optimized just for CS4.

    I can download still special Quadro drivers just for Solidworks 2010, and CS4.

    Gaming cards are more definable by the numbers- highest frame rates on highest settings, while workstation graphics cards are a complex decision, in place of speed, there a different set of priorities, much more subjective components in terms of image quality and stability.

    This user review on newegg of the Firepro W8000 puts it very well an dis obviously based on experience that I don't have, but with similar conclusions>

    >""Pros: My Company bought one for a new workstation build. Ir runs plenty fast... I ran a benchmark on it and purely from a graphics rating prospective, it's faster than a GTX 680. That means that it's about double as expensive as gaming cards for the raw computing power you get... But this is Workstation graphics.

    Cons: Drivers are still being updated constantly... Nvidia has a reputation for better drivers than AMD.

    Other Thoughts: In terms of raw power, this card is great, better than the quadro 5000 (not sure about the k5000 yet). The problem you could run into is drivers and support for your application. As the drivers are optimized, the hardware will be able to utilize its full potential.. As I said before, the power in the GPU Passmark benchmark that I ran is faster than GTX 680. In actual applications it depends on what you're doing... Also it's hard to say where the W8000 will ultimately end up; even then though, you still have to look at your application. It's not easy to just say buy this since there are so many variables on the driver/software end of things. As for hardware, AMD has a reputation for giving you more for your money than Nvidia. ""< END

    If I could buy any graphics card I wanted, it would be a Quadro 6000 ($3,600) or K5000 ($1,800). I would very much like to try Firepros, except even at somewhat lower Firepro prices- an S10000 is $3,300 and W8000 is $1,450 , but experimentation is too bloody expensive.

    Cheers,

    BambiBoom
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