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Heating of laptop when plugged-in directly

Last response: in Laptop General Discussion
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April 26, 2013 4:33:43 AM

Hello everyone,
I have a question regarding my laptop. It usually heats-up when it is plugged directly into the socket. I usually remove my battery while it is plugged-in, I heard that I can extend by battery life if I keep it from charging and discharging as many times as possible. So my question is why does my laptop and others usually heat-up when it is plugged in directly rather than when it is running on battery power?
a c 296 D Laptop
April 26, 2013 5:58:31 AM

On battery, laptops usually run in a lower power configuration. Underlock the CPU, slow down the fans, turn down the screen brightness...all to preserve battery power.
Plugged in, there is no need for that, and everything runs at full speed. Hence, more heat.

And laptops run hot anyway. Some hotter than others.
a b D Laptop
April 26, 2013 3:53:17 PM

USAFRet said:
On battery, laptops usually run in a lower power configuration. Underlock the CPU, slow down the fans, turn down the screen brightness...all to preserve battery power.
Plugged in, there is no need for that, and everything runs at full speed. Hence, more heat.

And laptops run hot anyway. Some hotter than others.


This.

Also, regarding battery life, it's ideal to keep the charge between 20% - 80% unless doing a calibration. You can read up about battery calibration and wear and tear here if you like: http://batterycare.net/en/guide.html
April 26, 2013 4:04:12 PM

What prostar said. Most newer laptops like lenovo, HP, and sony inlude software with the power option called " extend battery life " , this actually stops the battery from charging more than 80%. This is to preserve battery for longevity, something very important for us with integrated batteries ( like myself ). And the first answer was right on the money! when it's plugged in, nothing is throttled, and there is no need, which means all of that stuff starts kicking in and making heat. It's never an issue ( heat ) until it actually burns to the touch. If it burns you, download something like speccy, or something similar, and check your temps. you want to be below 90C, and below 70C unless your doing something intensive. For example, if you are just on here browsing the web with us awesome people, you don't want your mobo to be at 85C that would mean something else could be wrong. Everyone perception of " hot " is different, get a program to monitor, then tell us how hott it is :) 
!