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What kind of PSU will I need for the server I am making

Last response: in Computer Peripherals
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May 3, 2013 1:11:12 PM

Here is a list of all the parts:

CPU:
Intel® Xeon® Processor E5-2650
Intel® Xeon® Processor E5-2650
Motherboard:
ASUS Z9PE-D8-WS Workstation Motherboard
Case:
Cooler Master Cosmos II RC-1200-KKN1 Tower Case
(Water Cooling may be installed later if too loud)
RAM:
Corsair® Vengeance® — 32GB DDR3 (4x8Gb)
GPU:
GeForce 210
Hard Drives:
WD VelociRaptor 1TB 10000 RPM
Western Digital Red 1TB

I would also like a bit of room for further expansion

More about : kind psu server making

May 3, 2013 1:22:47 PM

Maybe try using this online calculator. It's a little old (only has the 1650), but it should give you good numbers. The 1650 has a higher TDP by 35 watts than the 2650 does, so you can assume that you'll actually consume at least 70 watts less, or play it safe and just use those numbers (the latter would be my recommendation).

http://www.thermaltake.outervision.com/

Also in my experience, you'll want to calculate the max consumption, then multiply that value by about 1.2 to find the capacity of powersupply you actually want. It'll keep your system from wearing out too quickly, and about that point is the peak of the efficiency curves on most powersupplies.
May 3, 2013 1:31:55 PM

Aaron Simmons said:
Maybe try using this online calculator. It's a little old (only has the 1650), but it should give you good numbers. The 1650 has a higher TDP by 35 watts than the 2650 does, so you can assume that you'll actually consume at least 70 watts less, or play it safe and just use those numbers (the latter would be my recommendation).

http://www.thermaltake.outervision.com/

Also in my experience, you'll want to calculate the max consumption, then multiply that value by about 1.2 to find the capacity of powersupply you actually want. It'll keep your system from wearing out too quickly, and about that point is the peak of the efficiency curves on most powersupplies.


I've tried that calculator and it just doesn't seem accurate enough for me, any idea how I could calculate the Max Watts without it?
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May 3, 2013 1:43:16 PM

Tombis said:
Aaron Simmons said:
Maybe try using this online calculator. It's a little old (only has the 1650), but it should give you good numbers. The 1650 has a higher TDP by 35 watts than the 2650 does, so you can assume that you'll actually consume at least 70 watts less, or play it safe and just use those numbers (the latter would be my recommendation).

http://www.thermaltake.outervision.com/

Also in my experience, you'll want to calculate the max consumption, then multiply that value by about 1.2 to find the capacity of powersupply you actually want. It'll keep your system from wearing out too quickly, and about that point is the peak of the efficiency curves on most powersupplies.


I've tried that calculator and it just doesn't seem accurate enough for me, any idea how I could calculate the Max Watts without it?


Well you could either try to look up/calculate the wattage of each part and add it up, or you could put the build together with the recommended PSU, then run it at load on an energy-calculating plug (like a kill-a-watt meter), then look up the efficiency of the powersupply you're using, attempt to calculate the actual consumption of the parts based on that efficiency curve, then take back the power supply and get one you're more comfortable with.

The former is what they do to get the numbers for the online calculators anyway. As some notes: The actual consumption of the CPU is usually a ways above whatever spec intel or amd gives you. Any decent benchmark will give you an actual value. So use that. The same goes for graphics cards and motherboards. On hard drives and optical drives. The rated consumption is the spin-up consumption. Once the disk is moving the consumption is much, much lower. And you don't really need to worry about SSDs or RAM.
May 3, 2013 2:14:08 PM

I'm thinking of going with 1200 Watts, because latter ill be installing 11 more HDD's and A cd drive. Is it overkill?
May 3, 2013 5:00:40 PM

Tombis said:
I'm thinking of going with 1200 Watts, because latter ill be installing 11 more HDD's and A cd drive. Is it overkill?


That's well beyond overkill. I'm calculating about a 500 watt powersupply for the core components. On top of that, another 7-10 watts per hard drive on spin-up, and you'll never see all 12 hdds spin up at the exact same time. I only get about 700 watts in that case (being generous). 1200 watt psu's are for people running triple and quad graphics setups.
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