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Computer Powers Off Randomly Then Restarts

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May 7, 2013 4:40:33 PM

Hello everyone,

Just got a new PC about a month ago. First I do after turning it on is run Windows Updates. After only 2 minutes of that, my computer powers itself off. I'm not talking about a normal restart. It's like the power went out in the unit. It then turns itself back on after a couple of seconds. This happens at least 10 times over the next few hours while trying to proceed as normal.

After awhile, I call CyberPower and they tell me to try reinstalling Windows 7. This doesn't help and the same thing happens. I call them back and they have me ship my computer in.

I finally got my computer back 2 days ago and everything is the same. It randomly powers off while doing mundane tasks. The first time it happens this time was when I was on Facebook.

Any help would be appreciated. I have done some research and I have a ExtremeGear 600W PSU unit. Is that the problem or could it be something else?

Also, I know it's not my powerstrip that is the problem. Just bought a brand new Belkin one.

Here are my computer stats:

CD: 24X Double Layer Dual Format DVD+-R/+-RW + CD-R/RW Drive (BLACK COLOR)
COOLANT: Standard Coolant
CPU: Intel(R) Core™ i7-3770 3.40 GHz 8MB Intel Smart Cache LGA1155
CS_FAN: Maximum 120MM Case Cooling Fans for your selected case
FAN: Asetek 510LC Liquid Cooling System 120MM Radiator & Fan (Enhanced Cooling Performance + Extreme Silent at 20dBA) (Single Standard 120MM Fan)
HDD: 128GB OCZ Octane SATA-III 6.0Gb/s SSD - 470MB/s Read & 210Mb/s Writes
HDD2: 500GB SATA-II 3.0Gb/s 16MB Cache 7200RPM HDD
IEEE_CARD: None
IUSB: Built-in USB 2.0 Ports
MEMORY: 16GB (4GBx4) DDR3/1600MHz Dual Channel Memory [+89] (Corsair or Major Brand)
MOTHERBOARD: * [CrossFireX] ASUS P8Z77-V LX Intel Z77 Chipset DDR3 ATX Mainboard w/ IRST, Lucid Virtu MVP, 7.1 HD Audio, GbLAN, 2x PCIe x16 (1 Gen3, 1 Gen2), 2x PCIe x1 & 3 PCI (Extreme OC Certified)
NETWORK: Onboard Gigabit LAN Network
OS: Microsoft(R) Windows 7 Home Premium [+0] (64-bit Edition)
OVERCLOCK: No Overclocking
POWERSUPPLY: 600 Watts XtremeGear
SOUND: HIGH DEFINITION ON-BOARD 7.1 AUDIO
VIDEO: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 650 Ti Boost 2GB 16X PCIe 3.0 Video Card
May 8, 2013 7:56:12 AM

Bump! Any help would be greatly appreciate.
May 8, 2013 10:23:04 AM

Neclord said:
Hello everyone,

Just got a new PC about a month ago. First I do after turning it on is run Windows Updates. After only 2 minutes of that, my computer powers itself off. I'm not talking about a normal restart. It's like the power went out in the unit. It then turns itself back on after a couple of seconds. This happens at least 10 times over the next few hours while trying to proceed as normal.

After awhile, I call CyberPower and they tell me to try reinstalling Windows 7. This doesn't help and the same thing happens. I call them back and they have me ship my computer in.

I finally got my computer back 2 days ago and everything is the same. It randomly powers off while doing mundane tasks. The first time it happens this time was when I was on Facebook.

Any help would be appreciated. I have done some research and I have a ExtremeGear 600W PSU unit. Is that the problem or could it be something else?

Also, I know it's not my powerstrip that is the problem. Just bought a brand new Belkin one.

Here are my computer stats:

CD: 24X Double Layer Dual Format DVD+-R/+-RW + CD-R/RW Drive (BLACK COLOR)
COOLANT: Standard Coolant
CPU: Intel(R) Core™ i7-3770 3.40 GHz 8MB Intel Smart Cache LGA1155
CS_FAN: Maximum 120MM Case Cooling Fans for your selected case
FAN: Asetek 510LC Liquid Cooling System 120MM Radiator & Fan (Enhanced Cooling Performance + Extreme Silent at 20dBA) (Single Standard 120MM Fan)
HDD: 128GB OCZ Octane SATA-III 6.0Gb/s SSD - 470MB/s Read & 210Mb/s Writes
HDD2: 500GB SATA-II 3.0Gb/s 16MB Cache 7200RPM HDD
IEEE_CARD: None
IUSB: Built-in USB 2.0 Ports
MEMORY: 16GB (4GBx4) DDR3/1600MHz Dual Channel Memory [+89] (Corsair or Major Brand)
MOTHERBOARD: * [CrossFireX] ASUS P8Z77-V LX Intel Z77 Chipset DDR3 ATX Mainboard w/ IRST, Lucid Virtu MVP, 7.1 HD Audio, GbLAN, 2x PCIe x16 (1 Gen3, 1 Gen2), 2x PCIe x1 & 3 PCI (Extreme OC Certified)
NETWORK: Onboard Gigabit LAN Network
OS: Microsoft(R) Windows 7 Home Premium [+0] (64-bit Edition)
OVERCLOCK: No Overclocking
POWERSUPPLY: 600 Watts XtremeGear
SOUND: HIGH DEFINITION ON-BOARD 7.1 AUDIO
VIDEO: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 650 Ti Boost 2GB 16X PCIe 3.0 Video Card


Yea, the PSU very well could be the problem. It doesn't seem to have a very good reputation. Just from what I've read about it on google, I'd take it out regardless of whether or not it's the problem and try another one.
Related resources
May 8, 2013 10:52:41 AM

macten said:

Yea, the PSU very well could be the problem. It doesn't seem to have a very good reputation. Just from what I've read about it on google, I'd take it out regardless of whether or not it's the problem and try another one.


I'll be receiving a 650W Corsair PSU today. I'm going to install that and see if that fixes my issue. I'll post back either way tonight.

May 8, 2013 10:56:35 AM

Neclord said:
macten said:

Yea, the PSU very well could be the problem. It doesn't seem to have a very good reputation. Just from what I've read about it on google, I'd take it out regardless of whether or not it's the problem and try another one.


I'll be receiving a 650W Corsair PSU today. I'm going to install that and see if that fixes my issue. I'll post back either way tonight.



If it were mine I'd also pull out all of the memory except one before you power it back up, if you don't have any problems with the new PSU w/ one memory stick then I'd go ahead shut it down, put the others back in and power it back up.
May 8, 2013 11:31:10 AM

macten said:
Neclord said:
macten said:

Yea, the PSU very well could be the problem. It doesn't seem to have a very good reputation. Just from what I've read about it on google, I'd take it out regardless of whether or not it's the problem and try another one.


I'll be receiving a 650W Corsair PSU today. I'm going to install that and see if that fixes my issue. I'll post back either way tonight.



If it were mine I'd also pull out all of the memory except one before you power it back up, if you don't have any problems with the new PSU w/ one memory stick then I'd go ahead shut it down, put the others back in and power it back up.


Why would you do that? To make sure the new PSU doesn't fry the sticks?
May 8, 2013 12:00:22 PM

Neclord said:
macten said:
Neclord said:
macten said:

Yea, the PSU very well could be the problem. It doesn't seem to have a very good reputation. Just from what I've read about it on google, I'd take it out regardless of whether or not it's the problem and try another one.


I'll be receiving a 650W Corsair PSU today. I'm going to install that and see if that fixes my issue. I'll post back either way tonight.



If it were mine I'd also pull out all of the memory except one before you power it back up, if you don't have any problems with the new PSU w/ one memory stick then I'd go ahead shut it down, put the others back in and power it back up.


Why would you do that? To make sure the new PSU doesn't fry the sticks?


No, it's just a step in general troubleshooting practices. Memory, for whatever reason, can cause a computer to do funny things in my experience. For instance, where I work we have about 100 Dell computers. 2/3 times when I have one that won't boot, or acts up on me I'll pull both memory sticks out and put one in making sure it's firmly in the slot. Plug the PC back in and it will boot right up. Then shut it down and put the second one in and see what happens. Generally nothing, the computer for whatever reason starts up normally and I have no problems just because I removed both memory sticks and put them back in.

I don't know what your knowledge of them is, but there is nothing wrong with just trying the PSU first. If it still acts up, read up on memory. Most likely your computer has 2 banks with four slots in them. You have to put the one stick in the correct slot for the PC to boot up, then the second stick has to go into the second bank if you just have two. I believe you have four sticks though so the only point is if you try to boot it up with one stick in it, make sure it's in the right slot.
May 8, 2013 12:03:45 PM

macten said:

No, it's just a step in general troubleshooting practices. Memory, for whatever reason, can cause a computer to do funny things in my experience. For instance, where I work we have about 100 Dell computers. 2/3 times when I have one that won't boot, or acts up on me I'll pull both memory sticks out and put one in making sure it's firmly in the slot. Plug the PC back in and it will boot right up. Then shut it down and put the second one in and see what happens. Generally nothing, the computer for whatever reason starts up normally and I have no problems just because I removed both memory sticks and put them back in.

I don't know what your knowledge of them is, but there is nothing wrong with just trying the PSU first. If it still acts up, read up on memory. Most likely your computer has 2 banks with four slots in them. You have to put the one stick in the correct slot for the PC to boot up, then the second stick has to go into the second bank if you just have two. I believe you have four sticks though so the only point is if you try to boot it up with one stick in it, make sure it's in the right slot.


I ran memtest86 a few times and got a pass on every stick but I'll try this if my PSU doesn't fix the issue. Thanks for all your help!
May 11, 2013 11:20:39 AM

A few things have happened since the last time I posted. I got a new powerstrip, a new psu in, and ran memtest86 extensively. It is still powering off randomly after doing all those things. Any more ideas? I'm currently typing this with my graphics card out and using the on-board graphics.
May 11, 2013 10:41:02 PM

Neclord said:
A few things have happened since the last time I posted. I got a new powerstrip, a new psu in, and ran memtest86 extensively. It is still powering off randomly after doing all those things. Any more ideas? I'm currently typing this with my graphics card out and using the on-board graphics.


Your doing it really. If it runs fine without the graphics card in it then test it with a cheap card. Make sure that its the card and not the motherboard, which to be honest is what I'm suspecting may be the problem.
May 12, 2013 3:44:57 AM

macten said:
Your doing it really. If it runs fine without the graphics card in it then test it with a cheap card. Make sure that its the card and not the motherboard, which to be honest is what I'm suspecting may be the problem.


It's not the graphics card. It still powered off. There isn't much left other than the motherboard. Any more ideas or is it to the point that I just need to send it in and get the motherboard replaced?

May 12, 2013 8:26:38 AM

Neclord said:
macten said:
Your doing it really. If it runs fine without the graphics card in it then test it with a cheap card. Make sure that its the card and not the motherboard, which to be honest is what I'm suspecting may be the problem.


It's not the graphics card. It still powered off. There isn't much left other than the motherboard. Any more ideas or is it to the point that I just need to send it in and get the motherboard replaced?



You tried it with one stick of RAM? I don't think the HD would cause this but you never know, one thing about computers is the symptom hardly ever points to a cause. You don't get any beeps while booting up do you? If it's still under warranty it may be best just to pack it up and send it back.
May 12, 2013 2:07:15 PM

macten said:
You tried it with one stick of RAM? I don't think the HD would cause this but you never know, one thing about computers is the symptom hardly ever points to a cause. You don't get any beeps while booting up do you? If it's still under warranty it may be best just to pack it up and send it back.


I'm trying the one stick now. If it happens with one stick in, is it safe to say that the RAM isn't the problem?

Also, I don't hear anything out of the ordinary when it is booting up. Thanks for all your help so far!!!!!

May 12, 2013 2:14:08 PM

Without going into the specs, auto updates does do that, restart several times, sometimes you get a messaging stating not to turn off the PC.
The updates need to be downloaded, then installed, and only a few at a time between each restart. You should consider just letting it run. Sometimes it takes a few minutes and other times as much as half an hour, depending on the amount of free space and the speed of your system.

If you haven't done any updates for a few months that also adds to the update list. One time I had 2133 updates in the waiting list and it took almost an hour of repeated self restarts and installs.

Actually, you should choose which updates to install like if you never use Outlook then why do you need to update it?

Edit -
Just a thought, did you upgrade fyour Os from a previouse version or a new clean install? If an upgrade, you may have references to the previous OS causing the system to be confuesed about the updates, maybe...
May 13, 2013 10:23:03 AM

TenPc said:
Without going into the specs, auto updates does do that, restart several times, sometimes you get a messaging stating not to turn off the PC.
The updates need to be downloaded, then installed, and only a few at a time between each restart. You should consider just letting it run. Sometimes it takes a few minutes and other times as much as half an hour, depending on the amount of free space and the speed of your system.

If you haven't done any updates for a few months that also adds to the update list. One time I had 2133 updates in the waiting list and it took almost an hour of repeated self restarts and installs.

Actually, you should choose which updates to install like if you never use Outlook then why do you need to update it?

Edit -
Just a thought, did you upgrade fyour Os from a previouse version or a new clean install? If an upgrade, you may have references to the previous OS causing the system to be confuesed about the updates, maybe...


It's not the updates that are affecting my PC. The restarts weren't the normal kind. It was like the power was going out in the unit.

Also, this is a brand new PC so it has never had a previous OS on it.
May 13, 2013 1:36:49 PM

Whe the updates occur, after being auto downloaded, the PC installs some then restarts, and a restart means that the screen goes black and the POST shows as if the PC is booting up. That's how some of the updates work.

The only other thing that might be occurring is that if you had just finished playing a PC game for more than 3 hours, had done other stuff prior to auto updates and the the procedure began, the pc would have been a bit exhaustyed of your previous dealings with it and felt a bit wearisome in doing the updates, and on topof that, the 600 watt PSU might not be as adequate as it should ber, your free space is somewhat lackiing and the OS has the download files scattered all over the place making it difficult to find them again...blah blah blah..

So, how much free space is on the OS drive?

"got a new powerstrip, a new psu in" New PSU, what watt?

Basically to do the updates you need to start the PC from a cold boot meaning that it should be left off for more than 10 minutes.
Don't do any other tasks before the update check, and do as instructed on the screen, don't turn off the PC yourself, allow the updates to continue. Try to take note of how many there are to update.

!