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Asus Z87 Motherboard Lineups Here!

Last response: in Motherboards
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Which motherboard will you buy?

Total: 15 votes

  • Asus Maximus VI GeneZ
  • 0 %
  • Asus Maximus VI Extreme
  • 20 %
  • Asus Maximus VI Hero
  • 7 %
  • Asus Sabertooth Z87
  • 14 %
  • Asus Gryphon Z87
  • 0 %
  • Asus Z87 Deluxe Pro
  • 7 %
  • Asus Z87 Deluxe
  • 27 %
  • Asus Z87 Pro
  • 20 %
  • Asus Z87 Plus
  • 7 %
  • Asus Z87-i Deluxe
  • 0 %
May 12, 2013 3:30:16 AM

For those who are buying Asus Z87 motherboards.
Here is a Link to the motherboards and pictures showcasing 10 of Asus's new Z87 lineups.
These motherboard use the new Intel Haswell Central Processing Units.
They will be rolled out on June 3rd
Link: http://wccftech.com/asus-z87-motherboards-unveiled-maxi...

Prices are now avalible at NCIX.com or Newegg and Amazon.
There are also new motherboards rolling out still, this includes the old ROG Maximus Formula coming back with a ROG armour similar to the Sabertooth and a Brand new ROG mitx form factor for mini mobile ocing lan rigs called the Maximus VI Impact.
Link:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ACT294y53lI
a c 150 Ĉ ASUS
a c 559 V Motherboard
May 12, 2013 5:46:25 AM

Nice. Prices?
May 12, 2013 10:28:34 AM

Yeah we would like to know the prices too, i am going to build something but at the moment the only thing that twists and questions is the prices on the upcoming M/B's
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May 14, 2013 10:18:39 AM

I need to know the price. I understand that the processor will be around $300-$400. So I am going to hope for the best and say the price for the Asus Z87 will be around $200-$300
May 25, 2013 12:48:09 PM

What's the difference between the hero, pro and sabertooth models besides the thermal armor? From what I can tell those are the mid range choices and I was planning to get one, but not sure which yet.
a c 150 Ĉ ASUS
a c 559 V Motherboard
May 25, 2013 1:29:06 PM

No specs yet on the ASUS site.
May 30, 2013 4:11:14 PM

lazykoala said:
What's the difference between the hero, pro and sabertooth models besides the thermal armor? From what I can tell those are the mid range choices and I was planning to get one, but not sure which yet.


They are all in different categories, Hero is a ROG and geared towards overclocking but it differs from the other ROG motherboards because it is cheaper and has less features but none the less still expensive at around 230 USD and better than the mainstreak line of Asus motherboards.

The Sabertooth is part of the TUF series motherboards which is geared towards durability, longevity, reliablity and cooling. In terms of overclocking, it is a step down from the ROG series but it is still above the average mainstream motherboards. The most standout features of this lineup of motherboards are the five year warrenty, the military spec components and the thermal armour.

The normal Pro version is a very solid choice. It can do a lot and overclocks very well and is a perfect board for a budget gaming build but it lacks special features that other series have like the ROG or the TUF. However, interms of mainstream Asus motherboard line up (excluding the ROG and TUF). it is the second highest end motherboard right before the Deluxe.

ROG= Republic of Gamers
TUF= The Ultimate Force

P.S: i personally own a Sabertooth Z77 and the thermal armour selling point is just a gimmick even with the fans on. The armour is nothing more than a dust and moist protection cover (Maybe Asthetics). So if your buying it for the Armour, just don't and get a Z87 Pro or Deluxe to save money for a better Discrete Graphics Card.

May 30, 2013 4:18:53 PM

alexoiu said:
No specs yet on the ASUS site.


There are no specific specs but i am planning to buy the mitx motherboard from Asus if the CPU has a 10 phase power delivery ( Compared to 8 in the P8Z77-I deluxe) since i counted the number of phases on the board(12). However if it is a 8+4 design where four goes to the iGPU. Then there will be not much improvement except for improved Wifi and more slots.

For the price range, many China websites have already started selling the boards and a Z87 deluxe goes for 300 USD.
Link: http://product.it168.com/detail/doc/598077_1_1/comment....
May 30, 2013 6:10:43 PM

System Analysis Program said:
lazykoala said:
What's the difference between the hero, pro and sabertooth models besides the thermal armor? From what I can tell those are the mid range choices and I was planning to get one, but not sure which yet.


They are all in different categories, Hero is a ROG and geared towards overclocking but it differs from the other ROG motherboards because it is cheaper and has less features but none the less still expensive at around 230 USD and better than the mainstreak line of Asus motherboards.

The Sabertooth is part of the TUF series motherboards which is geared towards durability, longevity, reliablity and cooling. In terms of overclocking, it is a step down from the ROG series but it is still above the average mainstream motherboards. The most standout features of this lineup of motherboards are the five year warrenty, the military spec components and the thermal armour.

The normal Pro version is a very solid choice. It can do a lot and overclocks very well and is a perfect board for a budget gaming build but it lacks special features that other series have like the ROG or the TUF. However, interms of mainstream Asus motherboard line up (excluding the ROG and TUF). it is the second highest end motherboard right before the Deluxe.

ROG= Republic of Gamers
TUF= The Ultimate Force

P.S: i personally own a Sabertooth Z77 and the thermal armour selling point is just a gimmick even with the fans on. The armour is nothing more than a dust and moist protection cover (Maybe Asthetics). So if your buying it for the Armour, just don't and get a Z87 Pro or Deluxe to save money for a better Discrete Graphics Card.



That helps but aren't these all in the same range? I mean don't they overlap features-wise and is it really just cosmetic/small differences like thermal armor, durability, color design that differentiate these? I realize they are different series (ROG/TUF/ASUS) but does that mean they are ranked high end/mid/budget respectively? For example if we ignore the thermal armor how does the sabertooth compare to the hero, what specific features differentiate them? Same goes for sabertooth vs. pro (or deluxe if that's the top budget mobo?).
May 31, 2013 7:08:12 AM

[/quotemsg]

That helps but aren't these all in the same range? I mean don't they overlap features-wise and is it really just cosmetic/small differences like thermal armor, durability, color design that differentiate these? I realize they are different series (ROG/TUF/ASUS) but does that mean they are ranked high end/mid/budget respectively? For example if we ignore the thermal armor how does the sabertooth compare to the hero, what specific features differentiate them? Same goes for sabertooth vs. pro (or deluxe if that's the top budget mobo?).[/quotemsg]


The features of the different series don't overlap. they all have basic features but with each series, there are several improvements done to them starting from the mainstream series as the baseline.

What ROG has and TUF and Mainstream boards don't:
Overclocking Panel for quick and easy overclocks outside bios
onboard oc switches for onboard overclocking outside bios
ROG bios
Supreme FX3 audio
Better VRMs for higher overclocks
Mpcie Combo2 (not avalible for Hero)
Liquid Nitrogen 2 mode
ROG software

What TUF has and ROG and mainstream don't:
Thermal Radar2
Thermal Armour
TUF components military grade
5 year warrenty
TUF fortifier
Dust Covers
Better VRMs for overclocking (This only applies to mainstream boards)

What mainstream boards have and ROG and TUF doesn't:
On board wifi (Avalible for ROG boards that have mpcie combo2)

With all the comparison of features listed. You can see that the mainstream series of motherboards is the baseline of asus motherboards. TUF and ROG series boards have everything that mainstream series have except for on board wifi for the TUF series and the ROG hero. it is not just cosmetics. There are software and hardware differences.

Mainstream series are the budget version of Asus motherboards and are the most affordable ones out of the three and are great for daily work use as well as gaming but does have any unique features otherboards have. It is targeted at softcore computer users that don't required alot of power and features.
TUF series is the mid range motherboards that are for reliability and also gaming but not as much as the ROG series. it is targeted at Lazy gamers that don't want to do alot of maintenance on their computer. But also want some power in their motherboards for gaming.
ROG series is the ultimate high end range motherboards solely created for gaming and overclocking purposes. it is targeted at hardcore gamers that utilize every single overclocking feature to achieve best performance.
Hope this answers your questions



May 31, 2013 1:29:45 PM

System Analysis Program said:
lazykoala said:

That helps but aren't these all in the same range? I mean don't they overlap features-wise and is it really just cosmetic/small differences like thermal armor, durability, color design that differentiate these? I realize they are different series (ROG/TUF/ASUS) but does that mean they are ranked high end/mid/budget respectively? For example if we ignore the thermal armor how does the sabertooth compare to the hero, what specific features differentiate them? Same goes for sabertooth vs. pro (or deluxe if that's the top budget mobo?).



The features of the different series don't overlap. they all have basic features but with each series, there are several improvements done to them starting from the mainstream series as the baseline.

What ROG has and TUF and Mainstream boards don't:
Overclocking Panel for quick and easy overclocks outside bios
onboard oc switches for onboard overclocking outside bios
ROG bios
Supreme FX3 audio
Better VRMs for higher overclocks
Mpcie Combo2 (not avalible for Hero)
Liquid Nitrogen 2 mode
ROG software

What TUF has and ROG and mainstream don't:
Thermal Radar2
Thermal Armour
TUF components military grade
5 year warrenty
TUF fortifier
Dust Covers
Better VRMs for overclocking (This only applies to mainstream boards)

What mainstream boards have and ROG and TUF doesn't:
On board wifi (Avalible for ROG boards that have mpcie combo2)

With all the comparison of features listed. You can see that the mainstream series of motherboards is the baseline of asus motherboards. TUF and ROG series boards have everything that mainstream series have except for on board wifi for the TUF series and the ROG hero. it is not just cosmetics. There are software and hardware differences.

Mainstream series are the budget version of Asus motherboards and are the most affordable ones out of the three and are great for daily work use as well as gaming but does have any unique features otherboards have. It is targeted at softcore computer users that don't required alot of power and features.
TUF series is the mid range motherboards that are for reliability and also gaming but not as much as the ROG series. it is targeted at Lazy gamers that don't want to do alot of maintenance on their computer. But also want some power in their motherboards for gaming.
ROG series is the ultimate high end range motherboards solely created for gaming and overclocking purposes. it is targeted at hardcore gamers that utilize every single overclocking feature to achieve best performance.
Hope this answers your questions





Great explanation! If it's true that only the mainstream boards have built in wifi that seems odd. The only reason I can think of for that is because people buying the high end mobos would want to install their own third party "better" wireless cards.
June 2, 2013 2:48:39 PM

So does anyone know what the release date will be on the Maximus VI Extreme? I was just on Newegg and they have the Sabertooth in stock, but none of the ROG boards.
June 2, 2013 9:06:32 PM

The Plus looks good enough for the price. If you need wifi/bluetooth built-in, better integrated sound chip (1150) and 12-Phase power then stick to the Pro. Here is a detail comparison of other models
June 2, 2013 10:45:56 PM

Paul Luong said:
The Plus looks good enough for the price. If you need wifi/bluetooth built-in, better integrated sound chip (1150) and 12-Phase power then stick to the Pro. Here is a detail comparison of other models


Nice comparison, but it's missing the ROG models and the links to amazon are showing socket 1156 which I think is just a typo? They are all 1150 aren't they? Also, it shows that the deluxe mobo is the only one that supports wireless ac is that true? If that's the case then that is the only one that is future proof.
June 3, 2013 10:32:35 AM

lazykoala said:
Paul Luong said:
The Plus looks good enough for the price. If you need wifi/bluetooth built-in, better integrated sound chip (1150) and 12-Phase power then stick to the Pro. Here is a detail comparison of other models


Nice comparison, but it's missing the ROG models and the links to amazon are showing socket 1156 which I think is just a typo? They are all 1150 aren't they? Also, it shows that the deluxe mobo is the only one that supports wireless ac is that true? If that's the case then that is the only one that is future proof.


There is no such thing as future proof, it all rounds down to personal preferance. If your sort of high end computer is it can run 1080p, max graphics on all the latest game titles, then there is no future proof computer for you as you will have to keep changing GPUs or new types of CPUs.
And no, the Z87 Pro edition, the Z87 expert edition and the Z87I-deluxe also supports wireless.
However, the low end boards such as the Z87A and the Z87C, the Z87 Plus, the Z87M Plus doesn't.
Remember, How good power delivery is always about quality of the power phases not the quantity. However, since the Haswell CPU chips now have built in VRMs, the vcore won't vary alot across all the boards if your going for lower clock speeds. However, VRMs on mobos aren't much of a factor now on the Haswell CPUs on achieving higher clockrates. There is a much bigger problem which causes the CPU to reach extreme temperatures on very little voltage. E.g 1.26V with temps up to 100C which causes CPU throttling. However i learnt this from a review and each silicon chip does vary so that piticular chip used in the review might be defective.
If you want to buy ROG Z87 boards, NCIX website has them. Link: http://www.ncix.com/products/?sku=84529&vpn=MAXIMUS%20V...
However if the stats and benchmarks on the review are true, then there is no point buying a ROG board as you can't use the full overclocking potential that comes with the boards unless you have a decent source of cooling. Keep in mind, in the review, an Corsair H100i was used in a push config on a test bench with dual static pressure fans in performance mode.
June 3, 2013 1:27:08 PM

System Analysis Program said:
lazykoala said:
Paul Luong said:
The Plus looks good enough for the price. If you need wifi/bluetooth built-in, better integrated sound chip (1150) and 12-Phase power then stick to the Pro. Here is a detail comparison of other models


Nice comparison, but it's missing the ROG models and the links to amazon are showing socket 1156 which I think is just a typo? They are all 1150 aren't they? Also, it shows that the deluxe mobo is the only one that supports wireless ac is that true? If that's the case then that is the only one that is future proof.


There is no such thing as future proof, it all rounds down to personal preferance. If your sort of high end computer is it can run 1080p, max graphics on all the latest game titles, then there is no future proof computer for you as you will have to keep changing GPUs or new types of CPUs.
And no, the Z87 Pro edition, the Z87 expert edition and the Z87I-deluxe also supports wireless.
However, the low end boards such as the Z87A and the Z87C, the Z87 Plus, the Z87M Plus doesn't.
Remember, How good power delivery is always about quality of the power phases not the quantity. However, since the Haswell CPU chips now have built in VRMs, the vcore won't vary alot across all the boards if your going for lower clock speeds. However, VRMs on mobos aren't much of a factor now on the Haswell CPUs on achieving higher clockrates. There is a much bigger problem which causes the CPU to reach extreme temperatures on very little voltage. E.g 1.26V with temps up to 100C which causes CPU throttling. However i learnt this from a review and each silicon chip does vary so that piticular chip used in the review might be defective.
If you want to buy ROG Z87 boards, NCIX website has them. Link: http://www.ncix.com/products/?sku=84529&vpn=MAXIMUS%20V...
However if the stats and benchmarks on the review are true, then there is no point buying a ROG board as you can't use the full overclocking potential that comes with the boards unless you have a decent source of cooling. Keep in mind, in the review, an Corsair H100i was used in a push config on a test bench with dual static pressure fans in performance mode.


I was just referring to the 802.11ac wireless standard which is apparently the future. Many mobos have a/b/g/n, but it seems only certain ones will have the newer "ac" standard.
June 3, 2013 1:44:31 PM

lazykoala said:
System Analysis Program said:
lazykoala said:
Paul Luong said:
The Plus looks good enough for the price. If you need wifi/bluetooth built-in, better integrated sound chip (1150) and 12-Phase power then stick to the Pro. Here is a detail comparison of other models








Nice comparison, but it's missing the ROG models and the links to amazon are showing socket 1156 which I think is just a typo? They are all 1150 aren't they? Also, it shows that the deluxe mobo is the only one that supports wireless ac is that true? If that's the case then that is the only one that is future proof.


There is no such thing as future proof, it all rounds down to personal preferance. If your sort of high end computer is it can run 1080p, max graphics on all the latest game titles, then there is no future proof computer for you as you will have to keep changing GPUs or new types of CPUs.
And no, the Z87 Pro edition, the Z87 expert edition and the Z87I-deluxe also supports wireless.
However, the low end boards such as the Z87A and the Z87C, the Z87 Plus, the Z87M Plus doesn't.
Remember, How good power delivery is always about quality of the power phases not the quantity. However, since the Haswell CPU chips now have built in VRMs, the vcore won't vary alot across all the boards if your going for lower clock speeds. However, VRMs on mobos aren't much of a factor now on the Haswell CPUs on achieving higher clockrates. There is a much bigger problem which causes the CPU to reach extreme temperatures on very little voltage. E.g 1.26V with temps up to 100C which causes CPU throttling. However i learnt this from a review and each silicon chip does vary so that piticular chip used in the review might be defective.
If you want to buy ROG Z87 boards, NCIX website has them. Link: http://www.ncix.com/products/?sku=84529&vpn=MAXIMUS%20V...
However if the stats and benchmarks on the review are true, then there is no point buying a ROG board as you can't use the full overclocking potential that comes with the boards unless you have a decent source of cooling. Keep in mind, in the review, an Corsair H100i was used in a push config on a test bench with dual static pressure fans in performance mode.


I was just referring to the 802.11ac wireless standard which is apparently the future. Many mobos have a/b/g/n, but it seems only certain ones will have the newer "ac" standard.


If you aren't using ethernet or some other hard line on a PC, you are doing it wrong.

Forget about the speed benefit of CAT-5, wireless is just more dangerous. You can insulate yourself a lot better over LAN.

For fun, put a Backtrack linux distro on one of your laptops and try cracking your own wireless network. You will be amazed at how easy it is and you will learn a lot.

http://www.backtrack-linux.org/

I see 802.11ac on a desktop motherboard being useful for things like ad hoc connections to a smart phone.
June 3, 2013 2:37:10 PM

Grandmastersexsay said:
lazykoala said:
System Analysis Program said:
lazykoala said:
Paul Luong said:
The Plus looks good enough for the price. If you need wifi/bluetooth built-in, better integrated sound chip (1150) and 12-Phase power then stick to the Pro. Here is a detail comparison of other models


Nice comparison, but it's missing the ROG models and the links to amazon are showing socket 1156 which I think is just a typo? They are all 1150 aren't they? Also, it shows that the deluxe mobo is the only one that supports wireless ac is that true? If that's the case then that is the only one that is future proof.


There is no such thing as future proof, it all rounds down to personal preferance. If your sort of high end computer is it can run 1080p, max graphics on all the latest game titles, then there is no future proof computer for you as you will have to keep changing GPUs or new types of CPUs.
And no, the Z87 Pro edition, the Z87 expert edition and the Z87I-deluxe also supports wireless.
However, the low end boards such as the Z87A and the Z87C, the Z87 Plus, the Z87M Plus doesn't.
Remember, How good power delivery is always about quality of the power phases not the quantity. However, since the Haswell CPU chips now have built in VRMs, the vcore won't vary alot across all the boards if your going for lower clock speeds. However, VRMs on mobos aren't much of a factor now on the Haswell CPUs on achieving higher clockrates. There is a much bigger problem which causes the CPU to reach extreme temperatures on very little voltage. E.g 1.26V with temps up to 100C which causes CPU throttling. However i learnt this from a review and each silicon chip does vary so that piticular chip used in the review might be defective.
If you want to buy ROG Z87 boards, NCIX website has them. Link: http://www.ncix.com/products/?sku=84529&vpn=MAXIMUS%20V...
However if the stats and benchmarks on the review are true, then there is no point buying a ROG board as you can't use the full overclocking potential that comes with the boards unless you have a decent source of cooling. Keep in mind, in the review, an Corsair H100i was used in a push config on a test bench with dual static pressure fans in performance mode.


I was just referring to the 802.11ac wireless standard which is apparently the future. Many mobos have a/b/g/n, but it seems only certain ones will have the newer "ac" standard.


If you aren't using ethernet or some other hard line on a PC, you are doing it wrong.

Forget about the speed benefit of CAT-5, wireless is just more dangerous. You can insulate yourself a lot better over LAN.

For fun, put a Backtrack linux distro on one of your laptops and try cracking your own wireless network. You will be amazed at how easy it is and you will learn a lot.

http://www.backtrack-linux.org/

I see 802.11ac on a desktop motherboard being useful for things like ad hoc connections to a smart phone.


That is missing the point. Not everyone has an Ethernet outlet to connect to and wireless is often the next best solution. Now, back to the point of which mobos will be most future proof by having wireless 802.11ac availability.
June 5, 2013 12:24:31 PM



That is missing the point. Not everyone has an Ethernet outlet to connect to and wireless is often the next best solution. Now, back to the point of which mobos will be most future proof by having wireless 802.11ac availability.[/quotemsg]

You normally can't go wrong with an ROG but it's features are a bit overkill for someone not going hardcore ocing or gaming. So i personally would recommend a Z87 Pro or Expert for you. Deluxe is a bit too much since it is the channel board that is geared towards massive overclocks with 16+2 phases (even dough i did say its about quality not quantity)
They will serve you well in the upcoming years and have the ability to do almost anything. (Jack of all Trades).
I personally really like having wifi and it is true going lan is more stable but not everyone has that and i used to be one of those people until i routed a lan wire all the way from the living room to my room. Also if your building a mobile lan rig like me, having wifi really helps. i swear CAT-6 is the fastest nowadays. CAT-5 is ages ago.
June 5, 2013 2:05:17 PM

System Analysis Program said:


That is missing the point. Not everyone has an Ethernet outlet to connect to and wireless is often the next best solution. Now, back to the point of which mobos will be most future proof by having wireless 802.11ac availability.

You normally can't go wrong with an ROG but it's features are a bit overkill for someone not going hardcore ocing or gaming. So i personally would recommend a Z87 Pro or Expert for you. Deluxe is a bit too much since it is the channel board that is geared towards massive overclocks with 16+2 phases (even dough i did say its about quality not quantity)
They will serve you well in the upcoming years and have the ability to do almost anything. (Jack of all Trades).
I personally really like having wifi and it is true going lan is more stable but not everyone has that and i used to be one of those people until i routed a lan wire all the way from the living room to my room. Also if your building a mobile lan rig like me, having wifi really helps. i swear CAT-6 is the fastest nowadays. CAT-5 is ages ago.


I agree a mid ranged board is probably what I will end up getting, but I'm one of those people who likes to plan for the future. I just don't want to buy a $200 mid range board and find out later that I could have had a board for $230-250 that includes built in wifi w/ 802.11ac (which is very handy as I haven't always had an Ethernet port in the past) and intel thunderbolt (which may or may not replace USB 3.0). I'm willing to spend that little extra to have some conveniences, but I don't want to have to pay for the top of the line $400 boards which have tons of extra stuff I wouldn't use and the high end boards are the only ones I've seen with both of those features. Maybe I'm just too picky and want the best of both worlds a $200-250 board with average features that still has the 802.11ac and thunderbolt.
June 6, 2013 7:41:32 AM

lazykoala said:
System Analysis Program said:


That is missing the point. Not everyone has an Ethernet outlet to connect to and wireless is often the next best solution. Now, back to the point of which mobos will be most future proof by having wireless 802.11ac availability.

You normally can't go wrong with an ROG but it's features are a bit overkill for someone not going hardcore ocing or gaming. So i personally would recommend a Z87 Pro or Expert for you. Deluxe is a bit too much since it is the channel board that is geared towards massive overclocks with 16+2 phases (even dough i did say its about quality not quantity)
They will serve you well in the upcoming years and have the ability to do almost anything. (Jack of all Trades).
I personally really like having wifi and it is true going lan is more stable but not everyone has that and i used to be one of those people until i routed a lan wire all the way from the living room to my room. Also if your building a mobile lan rig like me, having wifi really helps. i swear CAT-6 is the fastest nowadays. CAT-5 is ages ago.


I agree a mid ranged board is probably what I will end up getting, but I'm one of those people who likes to plan for the future. I just don't want to buy a $200 mid range board and find out later that I could have had a board for $230-250 that includes built in wifi w/ 802.11ac (which is very handy as I haven't always had an Ethernet port in the past) and intel thunderbolt (which may or may not replace USB 3.0). I'm willing to spend that little extra to have some conveniences, but I don't want to have to pay for the top of the line $400 boards which have tons of extra stuff I wouldn't use and the high end boards are the only ones I've seen with both of those features. Maybe I'm just too picky and want the best of both worlds a $200-250 board with average features that still has the 802.11ac and thunderbolt.


If your looking for a asus board on a price range of 200-250 dollars and has both the thunderbolt and the wifi. Only the expert and the deluxe/dual can statisfy you. The pro doesn't have thunderbolt. I would recommend the expert if your not ocing. Deluxe is more expensive dough
June 7, 2013 10:42:00 AM

IS the mini-itx out yet????????????????? can't wait any longerrrrrrrrrrrrr........
June 7, 2013 12:18:27 PM

Greg55 said:
IS the mini-itx out yet????????????????? can't wait any longerrrrrrrrrrrrr........


Which one? the maximus VI impact or the Z87I deluxe
The maximus will come out in six weeks from the starting of computex and the Z87I deluxe would probally be earlier. A week or two i am guessing, not sure.
I changed my mind on which one to get. Going for Maximus VI impact now since it has Digi+ III from ROG for better ocing
!