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ASRock's Debuts World's First Thunderbolt-Certified Mobo

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May 16, 2013 12:49:08 AM

So what's the difference between a motherboard with Thunderbolt certification and the Ivy Bridge Mobos that had Thunderbolt on them?
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May 16, 2013 1:12:09 AM

This is supposed to be the first Z87 Thunderbolt-Certified motherboard (emphasis on Z87), since we already have Z77 certified MBs.
Another case of journalists not knowing what they hell they copy+paste...
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May 16, 2013 2:35:22 AM

what a misleading title
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May 16, 2013 2:41:20 AM

Waterproof coating and Gigabit wireless...
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May 16, 2013 4:46:29 AM

JOSHSKORN said:
So what's the difference between a motherboard with Thunderbolt certification and the Ivy Bridge Mobos that had Thunderbolt on them?


An extra sticker on the box, pretty much.
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May 16, 2013 7:05:56 AM

Bad journalism? Well what did you expect with that sort of grammar in the title anyway? It should either be:
'Asrock debuts world first...' or 'Asrock's world first...'.
Anyway, not only is this in error because of the Z77 boards but Apple is also part of the world the last I heard and they had it on their Mobo's first.
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May 16, 2013 9:06:10 AM

All this certified this and certified that is nothing but nonsense. It's like that ROHS thing, before that all cables don't have it. After that, all packages say ROHS, is the same package with a ROHS sticker on it. So what is the difference when them when both cables are exactly the same. :pt1cable: 
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May 16, 2013 10:37:59 AM

lp231 said:
All this certified this and certified that is nothing but nonsense. It's like that ROHS thing, before that all cables don't have it. After that, all packages say ROHS, is the same package with a ROHS sticker on it. So what is the difference when them when both cables are exactly the same. :pt1cable: 

As I see it, ROHS does actually have meaning to it. While it is possible for the manufacturer to leave ROHS off the box and have the same product, ROHS does certify that the use of hazardous substances meets the ROHS specification. Products without that certification may have significant levels of the six hazardous substances that ROHS restricts.

Personally, I think something like THX is a better example. There are many products on the market that would meet THX certification, however, they do not bother to get THX certified because of the cost involved.

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