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Recommended good quality water cooling kits or individual cooling components for a Corsair 900D super tower case

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June 11, 2013 3:58:05 PM

I currently have a Corsair 900D super tower computer case, i am looking to water cool my build but i am a new to water cooling so i don't necessarily know what i need to water cool my CPU because i will be overclocking it. So i come here to ask what are some good recommended quality water cooling kits or individual cooling components for a Corsair 900D that you experts or other individuals may know of that you have been using for a while or are currently using that you recommend for me. Right now i am only going to water cool my CPU, but with time i will continue to water cool different components such as a graphics card. Any tips on how to setup the water cooling loop to be most efficient or other things to consider or think about will be greatly appreciated .
a c 176 K Overclocking
June 12, 2013 6:50:06 AM

First place to start for an intrepid water-cooler is the sticky. That will explain all you need to know to get a general idea of what your doing in regards to theory at least.
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/277130-29-read-first-...

From there, a more practical demonstration of water-cooling is good.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=krgK2dcxJ5g

In terms of parts to get, you'l find that the water-coolers here (including I) wont just give out a parts list like we would a system build. Water-cooling is a complex thing, you should know what your doing, what your getting into and why you have the components you do. So I suggest you pull together a loop you think will work, then post it here for feedback. We'l point out any issues, flaws or other nuances of the loop and help you hash out a potential loop.

For an easily upgradable CPU loop, expect to be spending ~$300. If you need a template to start off of, the XSPC Raystorm D5 kits are pretty good.
June 12, 2013 8:01:17 AM

Hi,

While water cooling used to be a real hassle, things have started improving a few years ago. I suggest that you look into the Thermaltake Water 2.0 Extreme (P/N: CLW0217). While it is not the cheapest water cooler, it's not the most expensive either (around $150 on Amazon) and it has some nice advantages over many other products:


  • Great performance (e.g., this is pretty accurate)
  • Easy to install
  • Very low risk of leaks
  • No refills required
  • Configurable


  • I hope this helps.

    Cheers,
    Bogdan

    PS: While most coolers are more or less universal, it's still a good idea to mention your socket type.
    Related resources
    June 12, 2013 12:24:45 PM

    manofchalk said:
    First place to start for an intrepid water-cooler is the sticky. That will explain all you need to know to get a general idea of what your doing in regards to theory at least.
    http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/277130-29-read-first-...

    From there, a more practical demonstration of water-cooling is good.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=krgK2dcxJ5g

    In terms of parts to get, you'l find that the water-coolers here (including I) wont just give out a parts list like we would a system build. Water-cooling is a complex thing, you should know what your doing, what your getting into and why you have the components you do. So I suggest you pull together a loop you think will work, then post it here for feedback. We'l point out any issues, flaws or other nuances of the loop and help you hash out a potential loop.

    For an easily upgradable CPU loop, expect to be spending ~$300. If you need a template to start off of, the XSPC Raystorm D5 kits are pretty good.

    Would this loop work? Pump-->Rad-->CPU Block-->Res.-->Pump

    a c 176 K Overclocking
    June 12, 2013 10:10:03 PM

    Yea
    June 13, 2013 10:57:42 AM

    manofchalk said:
    Yea


    Ok so i have gone ahead and looked at the XSPC Raystorm D5 Kits and have selected the XSPC Raystorm Extreme Universal CPU Watercooling Kit w/ RX360 Rev 2 Radiator/D5 Pump/Res, i have made sure that i have space in my case to place everything somewhere and made sure that the CPU block is compatible with my LGA 1155 socket. Is there any flaws with this kit?(e.g. the LED i can choose to put in the CPU block).
    Questions:The case came with 4 included fans(3 in front, 1 in the back) and the kit comes with 3 more for a total of 7 fans should i keep all the fans in the case or remove some of the fans?
    If i keep all 7 fans in the case i only have enough connectors for 3 fans, is there something else i can buy to connect the rest of the fans?
    Should i put LED's on the CPU block?
    Where can i read about the maintenance for water cooling?
    a c 176 K Overclocking
    June 13, 2013 9:33:04 PM

    The Raystorm D5 kits are fairly good start, only issue is that the tubing it comes with is very stiff IMO. Might be worth buying your own (and coloured if you want) aftermarket.

    1. Whatever works for you, though make sure you have airflow through the case as there are still components being aircooled.

    2. A good fan controller is a must for water-cooling. I use an NZXT Sentry Mix (1, not 2), Lamptron, Bitfenix and Sunbeam also make good controllers. Make sure it has at least 30W per channel, then you can run multiple fans from the one dial.

    3. LED's are purely aesthetic, if you want them, use them. The Raystorm block uses 3mm LED's I think (its been a while), you can always sub in your own if you don't want blue (I changed mine to red).

    4. Water-cooling sticky, linked it in my first post.
    a c 150 K Overclocking
    June 14, 2013 1:03:09 AM

    Bogdan Barbu said:
    Hi,

    While water cooling used to be a real hassle, things have started improving a few years ago. I suggest that you look into the Thermaltake Water 2.0 Extreme (P/N: CLW0217). While it is not the cheapest water cooler, it's not the most expensive either (around $150 on Amazon) and it has some nice advantages over many other products:


    • Great performance (e.g., this is pretty accurate)
    • Easy to install
    • Very low risk of leaks
    • No refills required
    • Configurable


  • I hope this helps.

    Cheers,
    Bogdan

    PS: While most coolers are more or less universal, it's still a good idea to mention your socket type.

  • I cry, I cry every time.

    Please.


    a c 150 K Overclocking
    June 14, 2013 1:04:35 AM

    manofchalk said:
    The Raystorm D5 kits are fairly good start, only issue is that the tubing it comes with is very stiff IMO. Might be worth buying your own (and coloured if you want) aftermarket.

    1. Whatever works for you, though make sure you have airflow through the case as there are still components being aircooled.

    2. A good fan controller is a must for water-cooling. I use an NZXT Sentry Mix (1, not 2), Lamptron, Bitfenix and Sunbeam also make good controllers. Make sure it has at least 30W per channel, then you can run multiple fans from the one dial.

    3. LED's are purely aesthetic, if you want them, use them. The Raystorm block uses 3mm LED's I think (its been a while), you can always sub in your own if you don't want blue (I changed mine to red).

    4. Water-cooling sticky, linked it in my first post.

    ALL OF THIS.

    Distilled water, colored tubing, and silver kill coil!
    June 14, 2013 2:40:04 AM

    manofchalk said:
    The Raystorm D5 kits are fairly good start, only issue is that the tubing it comes with is very stiff IMO. Might be worth buying your own (and coloured if you want) aftermarket.

    1. Whatever works for you, though make sure you have airflow through the case as there are still components being aircooled.

    2. A good fan controller is a must for water-cooling. I use an NZXT Sentry Mix (1, not 2), Lamptron, Bitfenix and Sunbeam also make good controllers. Make sure it has at least 30W per channel, then you can run multiple fans from the one dial.

    3. LED's are purely aesthetic, if you want them, use them. The Raystorm block uses 3mm LED's I think (its been a while), you can always sub in your own if you don't want blue (I changed mine to red).

    4. Water-cooling sticky, linked it in my first post.


    Ok thank you for the answers. I went on newegg and looked for fan controllers and the best one i found is the NZXT Sentry Mesh Fan Controller w/ Five 30 watts Channels http://
    June 17, 2013 5:44:47 PM

    amuffin said:
    I cry, I cry every time.

    Please.


    The OP said he's had no prior experience with water cooling so I recommended it as an entry level product, in case he was interested. I believe it fills that particular niche market quite well. What say you?
    !