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Building Future Sensitive Gaming Rig (Advice and suggestions please)

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June 26, 2013 9:08:16 AM

Hey folks, first of all thank you for reading this post. This will be the first time I've built a computer, so I would greatly appreciate input and comments. The build is here: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/1ap8f

Approximate Purchase Date: Either this week or near Black Friday

Budget Range: Around $1500
System Usage from Most to Least Important: Gaming, Internet, Movies, Media, Etc.

Are you buying a monitor: No
Do you need to buy OS: No

Location: Huntington Beach, CA

Overclocking: Maybe
SLI or Crossfire: Most likely (to accommodate future tech)

Your Monitor Resolution: 1920x1080
Why Are You Upgrading: Build a strong gaming rig that can run things well without having to upgrade too much later on

That's the gist of it. There's more lengthy details below, if you'd like to know. Thank you! :) 

==============Extra Detail=======================
The idea is a gaming rig that stays close to $1500 budget, that is also able to handle current and next gen games at optimal settings (doesn't need to be best quality) and is capable of swapping parts out to accommodate future tech. I already have a keyboard, 1920 x 1080 monitor, optical drive and Windows 7 Ultimate OS.

The CPU and Motherboard is 4th Gen, chosen to be as future proof as possible For memory, we chose 2x8GB for 16GB (seeing as most say 8GB is enough for most games), leaving two slots open just in case future games demand more RAM.
SSD and HDD initially had more room but I tend to keep most of my drives under 200GB at all times and I've an external HDD with 2TB (with only 20GB) used up. I'm not one to save lots of games, music, or folders. When I'm done with something, it gets deleted off my storage. The video card was going to be a GTX 770, but we found out that the Sapphire surprisingly outperforms it (and it's cheaper.) Correct us if we're wrong.

The Antec case is actually not what's on the list. Ours is a super mid tower to fit the big fat gfx cards nowadays. We've got plenty of fans to keep the system cool and create good airflow. Air will be flowing through the front, sides, back, and top of the case. Lastly, we chose the 750W Power Supply. Now most say this is overkill, but we want it this strong for SLI/Crossfire. The GFX card will inevitably start falling behind as time goes on, and that's when we'll slap on another GFX card. The extra power will supplement this demand on voltage.
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So with all that in mind, what do you think guys? Anything we can improve on? Anything we're missing?
And once again, thank you for your time and thoughts! :D  I'm open to all thoughts and criticisms.
a b 4 Gaming
June 26, 2013 9:57:23 AM

Drop the CPU to an i5-4770K.
June 26, 2013 10:07:24 AM

Drop the processor to an i5-4670k. The i7 does nothing for gaming but costs significantly more. Also, you might as well either drop the wattage on the PSU or get the second card for SLI/Crossfire now. But by the time performance on a single card would start slipping to the point that adding a second card would make a difference, you would get more performance by spending the same amount of money on a new single card of whatever the newest generation of GPUs is.
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June 26, 2013 10:19:47 AM

Hey folks, thanks for your response!
That was one thing I discussed quite often with my friend, whether to go i5 or i7. We were thinking that there could be a chance future games may take advantage of the core i7's features. I'll do some more research on my own, but what makes you think the i5 will be better for gaming than the i7 in the next few years?

And could you offer some support for dropping wattage/getting crossfire now? I'm still unfamiliar with the crossfire aspect (my friend's more savvy on that), so excuse my lack of knowledge. Couldn't I just use a next gen GPU together with my current one when it's starting to slow down? Or is Crossfire like RAID-0 where it needs to be an identical card?
a b 4 Gaming
June 26, 2013 10:26:21 AM

This future you speak of...

2 cores is the bare minimum for gaming. But 4 will be needed.

So what do you think about 8? Because that's how many the i7 has.

It presents huge cost at very little return. Your comment was a bit confusing, but

you need an identical card for CF/SLI. The GPU and the amount of RAM has to be

identical. That's it. Whether it's from ASUS, MSI or whoever and has these or that

I/O doesn't matter.
June 26, 2013 10:37:13 AM

OK I changed your build a bit. Check it out

If your priority is gaming you really don't need the i7 chip. The i5 performs on par with the i7 in gaming.
Also if you want to get the most out of your chip I would definitely suggest upgrading your Cooler to either a Kraken X60($107) or the more expensive Swiftech H220($150).
The motherboard is excellent.
In all honesty you don't need 16gb of RAM especially for gaming. Stick with 8gb and if you need more in the future through another 8gb in there.
The HDD and SSD are both fast and are great quality. I would definitely upgrade the 840 pro to 256g though. I find 128gb just isn't enough for the OS and several games.
Don't get me wrong, the 7970 is a fantastic card but now with the GTX 770 out for only a little more I see no reason to go with a 7970.
Also you don't need that massive case and all those fans unless you like sitting beside a giant vacuum. I switched I to the silent, sleek, cool and smaller Fractal Define R4.
Corsair PSUs are not the best and I don't think it is haswell certified. I switched it to a haswell certified Seasonic 750w. Its a great PSU.
Last is the mouse. It all comes down to personal preference. I personally find wireless mice gimmicky. I added my favorite mouse the deathadder 2013. Its very comfortable, wired and very customizable. As I said thouh if you prefer a Logitech mouse than by all means get that.

Hoe this helped. Feel free to ask any questions
Cheers!
!