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Ask Me Anything - Official Qualcomm Representatives

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July 15, 2013 9:51:36 AM

Tom's Hardware Ask Me Anything - Qualcomm
Ever wanted to ask one of the big hardware or software giants something directly? Why’d they do that? Where’d the idea come from for that last product? What’s in store next? Well, now you have the chance!

Tom’s Hardware is proud to announce the third of our brand new community features – ASK ME ANYTHING.

On Wednesday, July 17th, we’ll be hosting the third of a series of Tom’s Hardware Ask Me Anythings, and our guests will be official representatives from Qualcomm!

This thread will be unlocked, open and live for 24 hours starting at 12:00 noon eastern on July 17th, and questions will be moderated and supervised by Tom’s Community Manager, Joe Pishgar, and a full team of Senior Moderators.

Ask Me Anything Rules
• No tech support questions, as these require in-depth personal follow-up and diagnostics.
• All Rules of Conduct apply.
• Keep questions direct and to the point.
• Avoid opinion bias - ie: "Why are all your products awesome/bad/smelly?"
• Be respectful of our guests, no insults, no leading questions.
• Do not post duplicate questions, or repost your question multiple times.
• Not all questions may be answered. Questions may not be answered in the order in which they are received or posted.

Only registered users will be able to ask questions, so if you haven’t yet, be sure to register now for your chance to participate!

The official representatives will reply periodically over the time the AMA is active using a recognized and verified account.

Please join us on this date to throw your questions into the mix and ask Qualcomm what you've always wanted to ask.

What: Ask Me Anything – Qualcomm
When: Wednesday, July 17th, 12:00 p.m. Noon EDT
Where: This thread itself!
Who: Dan Novak, Vice President of Global Marketing, PR & Communications, Michelle Leyden Li, Senior Director of Marketing, Peter Carson, Senior Director of Marketing.

Our Guests from Qualcomm are-

Name: Peter Carson
Username:
Title: Senior Director of Marketing
Bio: Peter Carson is senior director of marketing and leads the modem marketing efforts for Qualcomm Incorporated. Earlier, Peter led the cellular technology product management team, with line management responsibility for the 3G/LTE modem roadmap, infrastructure chips and network vendor relationships, including interoperability testing programs.

Name: Michelle Leyden Li
Username:
Title: Senior Director of Marketing
Bio: Michelle Leyden Li is senior director of marketing for Qualcomm Incorporated. She oversees integrated marketing for Qualcomm’s Snapdragon Processors which are powering a new generation of advanced smartphones, tablets and other smart devices, so users can do more and recharge less.

Name: Dan Novak
Username:
Title: Vice President of Global Marketing, PR & Communications
Bio: Dan Novak is vice president of global marketing, PR and communications for Qualcomm Incorporated. Dan is responsible for developing Qualcomm’s overarching brand strategy and leading worldwide public relations.

This thread is now open and the AMA has begun!

More about : official qualcomm representatives

a b à CPUs
July 17, 2013 9:02:06 AM

Why do you advertise Snapdragon to consumers? It's not like we can replace our phone's current SoC :-) You believe people will base a purchase decision on the brand of SoC it uses?

Also, you should tell your web devs to not use low-quality .jpegs in their Flash body background advertising (e.g. Tom's homepage). They look really fluffy - you need lossless compression (looks pretty unprofessional as it is currently). The low-quality .jpegs aren't helping load speed anyway - I'd suggest not using Flash.
July 17, 2013 9:11:17 AM

I'll be relaying some of the questions coming through on Facebook and Twitter. Here's a good one:

Intel put out a press release last month about an Atom Z2580 outperforming several ARM-based competitors while using less power. As an incumbent in this space, what was Qualcomm’s reaction based on the metrics and methodology used?
Related resources
July 17, 2013 9:12:46 AM

How long will it take for mobile GPUs to reach the performance of the current ending generation of consoles (~200 GFlops) ?
July 17, 2013 9:17:27 AM

Are you planning or working on 64bit processors in your Snapdragon lineup? What's your multicore policy - are more cores better than less and how does that affects battery life? Are more cores viable in mobile devices or are you focusing on single threaded performance increase?
a b à CPUs
July 17, 2013 9:17:39 AM

Do you have any plans to expand to desktop CPUs?
a b à CPUs
July 17, 2013 9:19:29 AM

Also, if the S4 Pro supports it, why doesn't the Nexus 4 work with LTE anymore?
July 17, 2013 9:21:58 AM

sam_p_lay said:
Why do you advertise Snapdragon to consumers? It's not like we can replace our phone's current SoC :-) You believe people will base a purchase decision on the brand of SoC it uses?

Also, you should tell your web devs to not use low-quality .jpegs in their Flash body background advertising (e.g. Tom's homepage). They look really fluffy - you need lossless compression (looks pretty unprofessional as it is currently). The low-quality .jpegs aren't helping load speed anyway - I'd suggest not using Flash.


People are getting smarter about their technologies and we want to help them when they're making a decision about what to buy. Consumers can have an enhanced user experience by paying attention to the processor in their mobile device – this controls the performance and quality of the content users enjoy. Choosing a smartphone or tablet powered by a Qualcomm Snapdragon processor when they're ready to get a new phone ensures the device will deliver the best mobile computing experience without comprising battery life.
a b à CPUs
July 17, 2013 9:28:38 AM

Do you guys plan on using other architectures besides ARM? Such as MIPS perhaps?
July 17, 2013 9:38:12 AM

A few more incoming from Facebook and Twitter:

When will we see the first Snapdragon 800-based devices?

There’s so much focus right now on the processor performance of mobile SoCs. What other components does Qualcomm believe deserve more attention?
a c 210 à CPUs
July 17, 2013 9:49:31 AM

First off, I would like to say you guys make some incredible products for mobile devices. (As Alumni from USC, I am a big fan of Qualcomm)

Second, I am curious, how far do you envision tablets and other portable devices going in terms of gaming performance and comparable productivity features to notebook PCs? Do you envision features such as an office client port from Linux, or other productivity software? Obviously, some things would simply lack the resources to do effectively (i.e. encoding video and heavy rendering), however, some things would be great features to have that would allow cross compatability with a PC platform of one type or another.

Last, are you guys anticipating the Ubuntu phone OS launch coming soon? If so, what differences do you foresee in having a tablet/phone OS that corresponds directly with PC?
July 17, 2013 9:57:00 AM

Intel uses some form of ARM-to-x86 binary translation (forgot the specifics) to support most Android apps out-of the box, does Qualcomm have similar plans to support Windows x86 applications on its hardware?
July 17, 2013 10:06:48 AM

I'm curious about this rise of ARM processors in non-traditional laptops such as Google's Chromebooks. Do you believe this push to a laptop form factor is being lead by the various ARM chip manufacturers, or instead Google has simply found a low-cost power efficient chip that suites the needs of their platform. That being said, when is Qualcomm planning to bring an x86 chip to market?

My next question pertains to the pressure that I'm sure the whole mobile market must be feeling from Intel. Especially as they begin to increase their presence in mobile devices. Do you believe that Qualcomm will simply be able to increase performance and power efficiency to the level necessary to keep Intel sidelined in the mobile market? Will Qualcomm and other ARM companies expand to new segments, or are you intently focused on mobile? If not will the mobile market simply have another large share holder, or will Intel come and clean house much like in the desktop/laptop computing segments where it enjoys anywhere between 80-85% of market share.

Thank you for the AMA,
Daniel
July 17, 2013 10:14:45 AM

jpishgar said:
I'll be relaying some of the questions coming through on Facebook and Twitter. Here's a good one:

Intel put out a press release last month about an Atom Z2580 outperforming several ARM-based competitors while using less power. As an incumbent in this space, what was Qualcomm’s reaction based on the metrics and methodology used?

Huh? Those were dual-core Silvermont benchmarks...
July 17, 2013 10:18:48 AM

jpishgar said:
A few more incoming from Facebook and Twitter:

When will we see the first Snapdragon 800-based devices?

There’s so much focus right now on the processor performance of mobile SoCs. What other components does Qualcomm believe deserve more attention?


The first Qualcomm Snapdragon 800 device has already launched in korea with Samsung. You will start to see more Qualcomm Snapdragon 800 devices this summer. LG and Sony have recently announced devices based on the Qualcomm Snapdragon 800 processors, so keep an eye out for those.


Of the mobile SOCs, the CPU accounts for about 15%. Unlike some of our competitors who focus on a single technology component, Qualcomm leads across all key technology components: CPU, GPU, DSP, Modem, Audio, Video, etc. This complete approach is required to deliver the performance consumers expect within the tight design challenges of a mobile device.

All these components of the processor are also driving user experiences such as 4k UHD, 7.1 surround sound, dual image signal processors. A key component is the integrated modem - the world's first that supports LTE Advanced Carrier Aggregation, which improves LTE user experience with up to a doubling of data speeds.
July 17, 2013 10:30:02 AM

mastrom101 said:
Also, if the S4 Pro supports it, why doesn't the Nexus 4 work with LTE anymore?


That's a question for the OEM.
July 17, 2013 10:30:28 AM

In regards to 3D hardware acceleration, where do you see Qualcomm concentrating their efforts? Will the push continue to concentrate mostly on efficiency/performance-per-watt, or do you foresee resources being dedicated at least in part to a more game-centric SoC that puts raw performance over efficiency/battery life?
July 17, 2013 10:35:40 AM

mastrom101 said:
Do you have any plans to expand to desktop CPUs?


While we've not announced any specific plans for desktop CPUs, we've launched a Windows RT tablet based on our Qualcomm Snapdragon processor and have announced support for Windows RT in our latest Qualcomm Snapdragon 800 processors.
July 17, 2013 10:42:26 AM

mastrom101 said:
Also, if the S4 Pro supports it, why doesn't the Nexus 4 work with LTE anymore?


I've heard that was a licensing issue with google.
July 17, 2013 10:49:00 AM

A couple more coming down the pike from FB/Twitter:

The issue with AnTuTu seemed to be a lack of attention to the x86 ISA. At the same time, Qualcomm has its Vellamo benchmark suite. What work went into that test to ensure Intel’s architecture is evaluated fairly, and that Qualcomm isn’t favored automatically?

How interconnected are Qualcomm SoC design teams and your OEM partners? For example, Qualcomm Snapdragon S4 processors are standard for Windows Phone 8. How much involvement did Microsoft have in the development of the S4?
a b à CPUs
July 17, 2013 10:50:33 AM

When can we expect 16-core processors for tablets and smartphones?
July 17, 2013 10:55:40 AM

What does your new Krait 400 architecture bring to the table over designs like ARM's Cortex-A15 and Apple's Swift?
July 17, 2013 11:18:13 AM

My understanding is that Qualcomm quad-core processors can operate on any number of cores. If that's correct and they can operate on a single core to save power when that core is sufficient for the current does that mean your quad-core processors actually require less power, at minimum than your dual core processors? Asked another way, does your dual-core S4 Plus in the GS3 for Razr HD actually have a higher minimum power usage than your S4 Pro, Snapdragon 600, or Snapdragon 800? I'm wondering because that means a newer phone with your quad-core processor has the potential to get better battery life with the same size battery. Of course that doesn't take into consideration other factors but we'll assume the same screen and other things which I realize is unlikely.
July 17, 2013 11:36:03 AM

The S4 Pro Quad SoC was very exciting when it was announced. It then took forever to actually get into the market in devices and only made it into a small handful of devices before being obsoleted by the new Snapdragon 600 parts. Are we going to see better OEM adoption of your parts this round - or was this an issue of Qualcomm getting parts out the door for OEMs to use in their designs? The 8960 pretty much dominated the US market for 2012 while the APQ8064 was only in a few US handsets (3 really - Nexus 4, Droid DNA, Optimus G). Should we expect to see 8960 levels of adoption for Snapdragon 600 while Snapdragon 800 is quickly replaced by the time it is shipping in any meaningful volume in devices?
July 17, 2013 11:38:26 AM

Christopher Chambers said:
In regards to 3D hardware acceleration, where do you see Qualcomm concentrating their efforts? Will the push continue to concentrate mostly on efficiency/performance-per-watt, or do you foresee resources being dedicated at least in part to a more game-centric SoC that puts raw performance over efficiency/battery life?


We differ from other competitor chips in that we offer a comprehensive solution (AP, modem, connectivity, RF, PMIC, etc), our own GPU design with modern API support, our own CPU designs based on a balance of high performance and ultra low power, modem maturity (performance, multimode integration (7 modes), RF and connectivity integration), and significant performance per mW advantage. We always look at both vectors (performance and power) with regards to any of our IP blocks.
a c 210 à CPUs
July 17, 2013 11:54:07 AM

Evidently my first question didn't get much love, though I have another one:

As the ever increasing demand for mobile broadband bandwidth increases for consumers on portable devices, what innovations is Qualcomm looking toward in order to continue to increase mobile device bandwidth on it's current astronomical trajectory toward massive amounts of data transfer?

Additionally, in regards to the venture into windows phone compatible hardware, was that hardware actually x86 CISC hardware, or was the software adapted to run on ARM architecture? Do you see yourselves entering into competitive x86-64 space in the future?
a b à CPUs
July 17, 2013 12:06:32 PM

Hi,

I understand that your Snapdragon 800 works at 5Watt TDP ? I read some where (correct me if I am wrong , and please put the TDP specs in your site:) 

the point here is , this Chip is 2.3 GHz Quad-core Krait 400 , and my Question is , why dont you release which each Generation a minimum clock of the cpu possible ? with the lowest TDP possible ?

if this thing runs at 5Watts , then a 800mhz quad core should work well below 2 watts?

I guess android does not need more than 800mhz in quad cores if the programmers optimize it for 4 cores. and more over this woud give us double the battery life and less heat ?

pleae make such a thing happen , I hate the warm phone , and I want a small 4 ich phone with 24 hours usage !

you should allways make a low voltage lower frequency model of your CPU ... If I want 2.2ghz Quad I would buy a tablet to take advantage of the 4 cores. and for gaming and etc.

but for a phone ? give me COLD phone with 24 hours usage.

and a second thing ...

2- is it possible by today standard to make a chip that can be powered by solar cells only ? and at what frequencey and how many cores?

third ,

3- Can you please invade the Desktop market :)  we have windows 8 RT now , and I want to see ARM replace X86 .. and for missing power , make multi CPU Sockets motherboards ... like 4/2 ARM chips per motherboard ... 16 cores at 2.3 ghz :) 

July 17, 2013 12:14:43 PM

One advantage of many newer phones with Qualcomm chipsets is the integration of the radios, keeping all the essential electronics small (28nm) and close to each other. Are all current (S4 Pro, 600, 800) Snapdragons like this or do some have separate, non-integrated radio's. From some of the information I've seen it looks like some of the phones do not have the radio's integrated. If the radio's are not integrated, do they at least use a seperate Qualcomm 28nm radio so it's still low power?
July 17, 2013 1:10:33 PM

Some more from the hive-mind that is our social media channels:

Would you be able to share with us the process on how the Snapdragon SoCs are selected by OEMs for their smartphones and tablets? Is it a competitive process where the best chip wins?

I caught the DTS theatre demo at CES this year. It was certainly impressive, but I don't see myself using my tablet as the centre of my entertainment system. What else has to change about the industry before a high-end SoC is viewed as a viable replacement for a home theatre setup?
July 17, 2013 1:19:45 PM

jpishgar said:
Some more from the hive-mind that is our social media channels:
I caught the DTS theatre demo at CES this year. It was certainly impressive, but I don't see myself using my tablet as the centre of my entertainment system. What else has to change about the industry before a high-end SoC is viewed as a viable replacement for a home theatre setup?

I think this makes a lot of sense. I hook up my Maxx HD to the TV using MicroHDMI (which I think all Android devices should have). This would allow high-def video and multi-channel audio. Also, I have a cordless USB mouse I use via a MicroUSB adapter to control it when connected. While this may not be as practical with a phone I can see someone doing this with an Android tablet to watch video and other content on a regular basis. Especially if they have a tablet with an HDMI dock that provides power too. I'm really not sure anything would have to change my dual core 1.5GHz S4 Plus handles media very well and the Snapdragon 800 does 4k. I don't think my Maxx HD supports more than two channels but I wouldn't be surprised if the chipset itself is capable of that.

July 17, 2013 1:36:34 PM

aicom said:
What does your new Krait 400 architecture bring to the table over designs like ARM's Cortex-A15 and Apple's Swift?


Our Krait 400 is our latest custom-built CPU architecture that can be clocked up to 2.3GHz and fabricated on a 28nm Hpm process node. Our strategy encompasses the CPU but we also innovate on the other 80-85% of technology content that is critical to delivering great mobile experiences. Only Qualcomm technologies, Inc. purpose builds our own GPUs, DSPs, multimode modems, connectivity and CPUs and integrates them into balanced, high-performance, low-power systems.
July 17, 2013 1:55:26 PM

jpishgar said:
A couple more coming down the pike from FB/Twitter:

The issue with AnTuTu seemed to be a lack of attention to the x86 ISA. At the same time, Qualcomm has its Vellamo benchmark suite. What work went into that test to ensure Intel’s architecture is evaluated fairly, and that Qualcomm isn’t favored automatically?

How interconnected are Qualcomm SoC design teams and your OEM partners? For example, Qualcomm Snapdragon S4 processors are standard for Windows Phone 8. How much involvement did Microsoft have in the development of the S4?


Vellamo includes industry and reviewer (Tom's hardware included)-recognized benchmarks in it's results. Tests are device and processor neutral. Please check out the full list here.

We work closely with all our partners on both hardware and software design and testing. OEMs can take advantage of the featured available on Qualcomm Snapdragon processors to optimize and customize their products.

July 17, 2013 1:59:37 PM

8350rocks said:
Evidently my first question didn't get much love, though I have another one:

As the ever increasing demand for mobile broadband bandwidth increases for consumers on portable devices, what innovations is Qualcomm looking toward in order to continue to increase mobile device bandwidth on it's current astronomical trajectory toward massive amounts of data transfer?

Additionally, in regards to the venture into windows phone compatible hardware, was that hardware actually x86 CISC hardware, or was the software adapted to run on ARM architecture? Do you see yourselves entering into competitive x86-64 space in the future?


Here's some background from the source directly for your second question around Windows Phone compatible hardware. We'll hold comment on your last question.
July 17, 2013 2:17:02 PM

8350rocks said:
Evidently my first question didn't get much love, though I have another one:

As the ever increasing demand for mobile broadband bandwidth increases for consumers on portable devices, what innovations is Qualcomm looking toward in order to continue to increase mobile device bandwidth on it's current astronomical trajectory toward massive amounts of data transfer?

Additionally, in regards to the venture into windows phone compatible hardware, was that hardware actually x86 CISC hardware, or was the software adapted to run on ARM architecture? Do you see yourselves entering into competitive x86-64 space in the future?


Qualcomm modems support the latest communication technologies, including the latest advancements in LTE. With the introduction of Qualcomm Snapdragon 800, Qualcomm is shipping its 3rd generation LTE modem and was first to launch LTE Advanced with Carrier Aggregation (CA), a key feature that effectively doubles data rates for typical LTE users up to a peak data rate of 150 Mbps. Technologies like CA and other LTE-A features such at heterogeneous networks will help bring the LTE experience to the next level.
a c 210 à CPUs
July 17, 2013 2:18:33 PM

Michelle Leyden Li said:
8350rocks said:
Evidently my first question didn't get much love, though I have another one:

As the ever increasing demand for mobile broadband bandwidth increases for consumers on portable devices, what innovations is Qualcomm looking toward in order to continue to increase mobile device bandwidth on it's current astronomical trajectory toward massive amounts of data transfer?

Additionally, in regards to the venture into windows phone compatible hardware, was that hardware actually x86 CISC hardware, or was the software adapted to run on ARM architecture? Do you see yourselves entering into competitive x86-64 space in the future?


Here's some background from the source directly for your second question around Windows Phone compatible hardware. We'll hold comment on your last question.


Thanks for the response, what about my bandwidth question? I am sure you guys are cooking up some crazy data transfer technology...is there anything forthcoming?

EDIT: Scooped!! Thanks Peter for the answer!!
July 17, 2013 2:26:51 PM

hotice said:
One advantage of many newer phones with Qualcomm chipsets is the integration of the radios, keeping all the essential electronics small (28nm) and close to each other. Are all current (S4 Pro, 600, 800) Snapdragons like this or do some have separate, non-integrated radio's. From some of the information I've seen it looks like some of the phones do not have the radio's integrated. If the radio's are not integrated, do they at least use a seperate Qualcomm 28nm radio so it's still low power?


Our second and third generation LTE modems (radios) that are part of our integrated Qualcomm Snapdragon processors, such as the Qualcomm Snapdragon S4 Plus, Qualcomm Snapdragon 400 and 800, or used in connection with discrete Qualcomm Snapdragon processors like the Qualcomm Snapdragon S4 Pro or the Qualcomm Snapdragon 600, are all 28nm modems and have all the latest power optimizations available.

July 17, 2013 2:58:29 PM

scook9 said:
The S4 Pro Quad SoC was very exciting when it was announced. It then took forever to actually get into the market in devices and only made it into a small handful of devices before being obsoleted by the new Snapdragon 600 parts. Are we going to see better OEM adoption of your parts this round - or was this an issue of Qualcomm getting parts out the door for OEMs to use in their designs? The 8960 pretty much dominated the US market for 2012 while the APQ8064 was only in a few US handsets (3 really - Nexus 4, Droid DNA, Optimus G). Should we expect to see 8960 levels of adoption for Snapdragon 600 while Snapdragon 800 is quickly replaced by the time it is shipping in any meaningful volume in devices?


Today, there are more than 850 Snapdragon devices announced/commercially available and more than 475 Snapdragon designs in development. Of the more than 475 Snapdragon-based designs in development, 200+ designs in development are using Snapdragon 600/800 processors. There also are a number of leading Snapdragon 600 based devices, such as the HTC One and LG Optimus G Pro, available today. As mentioned earlier, the first Qualcomm Snapdragon 800 device has already launched in Korea with Samsung. You will start to see more Qualcomm Snapdragon 800 devices this summer. LG and Sony have recently announced devices based on the Qualcomm Snapdragon 800 processors, so keep an eye out for those.

Keep in mind, that we have a wide range of processors for different price points and experiences that are meant to address different market segments, including low, mid and high-tier devices. For example, we are continuing to see new devices based on the Qualcomm Snapdragon S4 processors, such at the Nokia Lumia 1020.
July 17, 2013 3:12:07 PM

jpishgar said:
Some more from the hive-mind that is our social media channels:

Would you be able to share with us the process on how the Snapdragon SoCs are selected by OEMs for their smartphones and tablets? Is it a competitive process where the best chip wins?

I caught the DTS theatre demo at CES this year. It was certainly impressive, but I don't see myself using my tablet as the centre of my entertainment system. What else has to change about the industry before a high-end SoC is viewed as a viable replacement for a home theatre setup?


We won't comment on the OEM selection process, as that is determined by each OEM.

The theater demo shows not only the capabilities of the theater use-case but also the experience you can get from your mobile device and taking that theater-quality audio with you wherever you go on your device.
July 17, 2013 3:17:50 PM

hotice said:
My understanding is that Qualcomm quad-core processors can operate on any number of cores. If that's correct and they can operate on a single core to save power when that core is sufficient for the current does that mean your quad-core processors actually require less power, at minimum than your dual core processors? Asked another way, does your dual-core S4 Plus in the GS3 for Razr HD actually have a higher minimum power usage than your S4 Pro, Snapdragon 600, or Snapdragon 800? I'm wondering because that means a newer phone with your quad-core processor has the potential to get better battery life with the same size battery. Of course that doesn't take into consideration other factors but we'll assume the same screen and other things which I realize is unlikely.


Qualcomm Snapdragon processors leverage our Asynchronous Multi-Processing (aSMP) design. Select a task and one the four cores will snap into action. Each core can throttle up and down depending on the task. The result is increased battery efficiency and a whole lot of performance. Check out this video explaining how aSMP works.
July 17, 2013 3:36:04 PM

SNA3 said:
Hi,

I understand that your Snapdragon 800 works at 5Watt TDP ? I read some where (correct me if I am wrong , and please put the TDP specs in your site:) 

the point here is , this Chip is 2.3 GHz Quad-core Krait 400 , and my Question is , why dont you release which each Generation a minimum clock of the cpu possible ? with the lowest TDP possible ?

if this thing runs at 5Watts , then a 800mhz quad core should work well below 2 watts?

I guess android does not need more than 800mhz in quad cores if the programmers optimize it for 4 cores. and more over this woud give us double the battery life and less heat ?

pleae make such a thing happen , I hate the warm phone , and I want a small 4 ich phone with 24 hours usage !

you should allways make a low voltage lower frequency model of your CPU ... If I want 2.2ghz Quad I would buy a tablet to take advantage of the 4 cores. and for gaming and etc.

but for a phone ? give me COLD phone with 24 hours usage.

and a second thing ...

2- is it possible by today standard to make a chip that can be powered by solar cells only ? and at what frequencey and how many cores?

third ,

3- Can you please invade the Desktop market :)  we have windows 8 RT now , and I want to see ARM replace X86 .. and for missing power , make multi CPU Sockets motherboards ... like 4/2 ARM chips per motherboard ... 16 cores at 2.3 ghz :) 


The Krait 400 is clocked “up to 2.3GHz.” That does not mean it is fixed at the max frequency. Qualcomm Snapdragon processors leverage our Asynchronous Multi-Processing (aSMP) design. Select a task and one the four cores will snap into action. Each core can throttle up and down depending on the task. The result is increased battery efficiency and a whole lot of performance. Check out this video explaining how aSMP works. This is one of the ways Snapdragon phones are designed to remain cool, check out.

I cannot comment about solar cells, but we can power phones with bugs. :) 
July 17, 2013 5:02:39 PM

Michelle Leyden Li said:
SNA3 said:
Hi,

I understand that your Snapdragon 800 works at 5Watt TDP ? I read some where (correct me if I am wrong , and please put the TDP specs in your site:) 

the point here is , this Chip is 2.3 GHz Quad-core Krait 400 , and my Question is , why dont you release which each Generation a minimum clock of the cpu possible ? with the lowest TDP possible ?

if this thing runs at 5Watts , then a 800mhz quad core should work well below 2 watts?

I guess android does not need more than 800mhz in quad cores if the programmers optimize it for 4 cores. and more over this woud give us double the battery life and less heat ?

pleae make such a thing happen , I hate the warm phone , and I want a small 4 ich phone with 24 hours usage !

you should allways make a low voltage lower frequency model of your CPU ... If I want 2.2ghz Quad I would buy a tablet to take advantage of the 4 cores. and for gaming and etc.

but for a phone ? give me COLD phone with 24 hours usage.

and a second thing ...

2- is it possible by today standard to make a chip that can be powered by solar cells only ? and at what frequencey and how many cores?

third ,

3- Can you please invade the Desktop market :)  we have windows 8 RT now , and I want to see ARM replace X86 .. and for missing power , make multi CPU Sockets motherboards ... like 4/2 ARM chips per motherboard ... 16 cores at 2.3 ghz :) 


The Krait 400 is clocked “up to 2.3GHz.” That does not mean it is fixed at the max frequency. Qualcomm Snapdragon processors leverage our Asynchronous Multi-Processing (aSMP) design. Select a task and one the four cores will snap into action. Each core can throttle up and down depending on the task. The result is increased battery efficiency and a whole lot of performance. Check out this video explaining how aSMP works. This is one of the ways Snapdragon phones are designed to remain cool, check out.

I cannot comment about solar cells, but we can power phones with bugs. :) 


ok another Question , if you can charge by bugs , can you charge by human movement ? it is more than bugs power :)  .oh and chargning is another thing , you chargre the battery , not run ahe device .. I asked about powering the device using solar cells.


a c 211 à CPUs
July 17, 2013 9:19:03 PM

sna said:
Michelle Leyden Li said:
SNA3 said:
Hi,

I understand that your Snapdragon 800 works at 5Watt TDP ? I read some where (correct me if I am wrong , and please put the TDP specs in your site:) 

the point here is , this Chip is 2.3 GHz Quad-core Krait 400 , and my Question is , why dont you release which each Generation a minimum clock of the cpu possible ? with the lowest TDP possible ?

if this thing runs at 5Watts , then a 800mhz quad core should work well below 2 watts?

I guess android does not need more than 800mhz in quad cores if the programmers optimize it for 4 cores. and more over this woud give us double the battery life and less heat ?

pleae make such a thing happen , I hate the warm phone , and I want a small 4 ich phone with 24 hours usage !

you should allways make a low voltage lower frequency model of your CPU ... If I want 2.2ghz Quad I would buy a tablet to take advantage of the 4 cores. and for gaming and etc.

but for a phone ? give me COLD phone with 24 hours usage.

and a second thing ...

2- is it possible by today standard to make a chip that can be powered by solar cells only ? and at what frequencey and how many cores?

third ,

3- Can you please invade the Desktop market :)  we have windows 8 RT now , and I want to see ARM replace X86 .. and for missing power , make multi CPU Sockets motherboards ... like 4/2 ARM chips per motherboard ... 16 cores at 2.3 ghz :) 


The Krait 400 is clocked “up to 2.3GHz.” That does not mean it is fixed at the max frequency. Qualcomm Snapdragon processors leverage our Asynchronous Multi-Processing (aSMP) design. Select a task and one the four cores will snap into action. Each core can throttle up and down depending on the task. The result is increased battery efficiency and a whole lot of performance. Check out this video explaining how aSMP works. This is one of the ways Snapdragon phones are designed to remain cool, check out.

I cannot comment about solar cells, but we can power phones with bugs. :) 


ok another Question , if you can charge by bugs , can you charge by human movement ? it is more than bugs power :)  .oh and chargning is another thing , you chargre the battery , not run ahe device .. I asked about powering the device using solar cells.



Charging the battery is powering the device - if you're charging the battery faster than the device is discharging it, battery level is constant/increasing.

Or does your wall charger not power your phone?
July 18, 2013 3:21:47 AM

Will we see Qualcomm to support the worlds most used operating system or will it just be that you support microsoft?
a c 211 à CPUs
July 18, 2013 4:05:33 AM

_TuxUser_ said:
Will we see Qualcomm to support the worlds most used operating system or will it just be that you support microsoft?


Huh? If you mean Android, that's where they likely get most of their revenue.

The version of the S4 sold in the US has a Qualcomm chip, as does the HTC One.
July 18, 2013 9:05:10 AM

Hey there all!

As it is now been 24 hours, the "official" AMA is concluded!

Epic thanks to the Qualcomm representatives who took the time out of their schedules to come and answer all the great questions our community had for them. We know this was a lot of work on their end, and we're greatly appreciative of the time taken to engage with the community here at Tom's Hardware. :) 

For answering so many questions, an epic thanks goes out to Peter Carson, Dan Novak and Michelle Leyden Li for the quick responses. Also, last but not least, a mega-thanks to Yelena Durmashkin at Qualcomm for helping to put this together on their end and securing the time and info required to make this happen.

As a heads-up, stay tuned to news and articles for the announcement of our next AMA which will be coming next week on Wednesday! We're on a roll with these!

Thanks again to all for making this a great success!

-JP
!